hilld's slow roll build

johnplyler

Active member
Nice weld job. It was such a nice job, I don't even see any grinding to clean it up!

I plan to have almost the same layout with almost the same components, so it is nice to see it all fits at the back on the driver's side.

The only difference I plan to do it attach all my components directly to the van's frame. I may have to install a couple strips of flat stock to accomplish this. This should have everything grounded better as well. For my enclosure, I plan to use 1/2" expanded aluminum to box it all in. The reason being for ventilation. I may install a small 4" fan to blow through keeping everything in the van (including the garage) more even temperature and humidity wise.
 

hilld

Well-known member
Yes, I am thinking about thermal management, I have a couple of these installed in my Home Theatre cabinet, thinking of incorporating something like this in the electrical enclosure. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00QFWWZQO/ -- perhaps the fans on one end of the cabinet and some punched metal lower trim on the other end. For the next few weeks it is going to be open as I work on getting other things done. Don't want to make my job harder by having to install and remove paneling while doing wiring, plumbing, cursing and praying.
 
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johnplyler

Active member
Cut the rear panel, access hole for the battery disconnect as well as the clear plexi glass with access holes for the switch and your finger to toggle the switch on the Victron Mulit Plus 3000 inverter

View attachment 181863

Battery switch installed

View attachment 181864

I chose to go a slightly different route that what I have seen here, I didn't want an accidental battery disconnect to cause a failure of the alternator, I wanted positive control to kill the field to the alternator in case the disconnect was operated while the engine is running or the vehicle is started with the batteries disconnected. Blue Sea make a disconnect switch in their larger series (9004 E in my case), that has AFD (Alternator Field Disconnect) wiring, that disconnects the field before disconnecting the batteries and vice versa engages the field slightly after the batteries are reconnected.

View attachment 181865

I don't have a pic of the wiring on this right now, but basically, you wire the AFD terminals in series of the field wire coming from the regulator going to the alternator. In my case, the field wire is blue from the WakeSpeed regulator and green at the Nations alternator, so along the way I have a color change in the wiring.

Time to make battery cables

View attachment 181866
View attachment 181867
Cut the rear panel, access hole for the battery disconnect as well as the clear plexi glass with access holes for the switch and your finger to toggle the switch on the Victron Mulit Plus 3000 inverter

View attachment 181863

Battery switch installed

View attachment 181864

I chose to go a slightly different route that what I have seen here, I didn't want an accidental battery disconnect to cause a failure of the alternator, I wanted positive control to kill the field to the alternator in case the disconnect was operated while the engine is running or the vehicle is started with the batteries disconnected. Blue Sea make a disconnect switch in their larger series (9004 E in my case), that has AFD (Alternator Field Disconnect) wiring, that disconnects the field before disconnecting the batteries and vice versa engages the field slightly after the batteries are reconnected.

View attachment 181865

I don't have a pic of the wiring on this right now, but basically, you wire the AFD terminals in series of the field wire coming from the regulator going to the alternator. In my case, the field wire is blue from the WakeSpeed regulator and green at the Nations alternator, so along the way I have a color change in the wiring.

Time to make battery cables

View attachment 181866
View attachment 181867
 

johnplyler

Active member
Cut the rear panel, access hole for the battery disconnect as well as the clear plexi glass with access holes for the switch and your finger to toggle the switch on the Victron Mulit Plus 3000 inverter

View attachment 181863

Battery switch installed

View attachment 181864

I chose to go a slightly different route that what I have seen here, I didn't want an accidental battery disconnect to cause a failure of the alternator, I wanted positive control to kill the field to the alternator in case the disconnect was operated while the engine is running or the vehicle is started with the batteries disconnected. Blue Sea make a disconnect switch in their larger series (9004 E in my case), that has AFD (Alternator Field Disconnect) wiring, that disconnects the field before disconnecting the batteries and vice versa engages the field slightly after the batteries are reconnected.

View attachment 181865

I don't have a pic of the wiring on this right now, but basically, you wire the AFD terminals in series of the field wire coming from the regulator going to the alternator. In my case, the field wire is blue from the WakeSpeed regulator and green at the Nations alternator, so along the way I have a color change in the wiring.

Time to make battery cables

View attachment 181866
View attachment 181867
I like this idea of having a positive control to kill the field to the alternator on your main ON/OFF switch. It took me a couple time reading this to pick up on it. Thanks!!!

I was trying to figure out your AC/DC distribution panel. I think I see it over the wheel well? I was looking for something not costing $500+. They look the same. Is one AC and one DC?
 

hilld

Well-known member
I know the bus bars are overkill and if I had paid full price way too expensive. (one is for positive and one for negative DC). DelCIty was clearing them out late last year for less than $60/each so I picked them up back then. The AC distribution will be handled by a pair of Blue Sea 1210 panels - https://www.boemarine.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=blue+sea+1210 -, 1 for "regular" inverter power and 1 for "shore power". The panels will be installed in the just fabricated cabinet (that is why they are not yet installed).

My plan was initially to have the fridge and water heater be connected to the shorepower panel, but I am rethinking that idea.

The fridge will be running DC, but perhaps when connected to shore power run on AC.

The water heater (Isotemp 4.2gal) will get its primary heat from a coolant loop, but I will hook up the 750W heating element as well. Initially, that was going to be via the shorepower panel but perhaps I will do this via the "regular" panel instead. This way I have the option to turn it on when boondocking.

Edit: Looks like they (bus bars) are back on sale again at DelCity, a few bucks more than I paid, but still a lot better than full price. https://www.delcity.net/store/1000A-PowerBar-Common/p_807984.h_931164
 
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hilld

Well-known member
The Victron MultiPlus 3000 has 2 AC outputs, 1 for regular inverting and 1 that is only active when on shore power. For example with the dometic fridge, I want to run on 12V DC unless I am on shore power. No need to invert to 120V and then loose efficiency. Hope that makes sense. But since this is my first build, I will probably end up redoing things again. It is all part of the learning experience here.

The thought was also to do the same thing for the electric heating element on the IsoTemp, but I have since rethought that. In the end, I might not do anything about the second AC Shorepower only panel. I will pull the wires and perhaps not connect them and not use the second AC panel. Sigh.
 

johnplyler

Active member
I would go look at
. This is Explorist Life. He does a build just like your and he is the one I am following.

I am no expert, but what I have gathered, the Victron Inverter/Charger figures all the power problem out for you as to what comes from where and goes to what. Your shore power cable can be used for shore power or generator. If you are running an air-conditioner or something with a high load the Victron Inverter/Charger will use power from both your battery, solar and shore power figuring it all out for you.

Victron Energy Q&A Webinar XVIII North America I just got this invitation this morning. I am thinking it is a question and answer program from Victron.

Keep in touch. We will figure this out. I am ordering my parts and getting my layout together also.
John Plyler
 

hilld

Well-known member
I have dismissed that one, I am ok with the Blue Sea 1210 AC panel as well as the Blue Sea 12 circuit DC distribution panel. I am not a fan of the combination AC/DC panels. But the nice thing about builds is that you can adjust to your hearts content. :dance:
 

johnplyler

Active member
Mounting my "wiring box" in the van, using the L-tracks as fastening locations

View attachment 181869

Leaving some historical evidence of my footprint. :rolleyes:

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Most of the cables made and installed, battery straps installed and in the van.


View attachment 181868

Getting things hooked up

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A quick side trip to the nursery to pickup a dogwood tree that I wanted to surprise the wife with.

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I see you have all your fuses in the Lynx distributor. I read the entire book on the MPPT, 13 pages, and missed the fuse size for the charge controller. Would it be the Max. PV short circuit current, 60 A? I have the 100/50 MPPT.

I was wanting to read about connecting the Blue Sea battery disconnect switch- 9004e. Do you remember where you got that information about using it with the alternator field disconnect?
 

VanGoSki

Well-known member
I have dismissed that one, I am ok with the Blue Sea 1210 AC panel
Are you actually considering 4 AC circuits? I think of my kitchen having all of its counter outlets on a single breaker and it seems like even two circuits in a van would be plenty.

Why not just mount a couple of these to one of the surfaces on your electrical cabinet? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000K2IKMI

That also allows you to keep the un-fused path between the breakers and inverter as short as possible, saves valuable wall real estate, not to mention money. Maybe the mini breakers will be less convenient to access, but how often are you blowing them? They're pretty much emergency only.
 

johnplyler

Active member
Are you actually considering 4 AC circuits? I think of my kitchen having all of its counter outlets on a single breaker and it seems like even two circuits in a van would be plenty.

Why not just mount a couple of these to one of the surfaces on your electrical cabinet? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000K2IKMI

That also allows you to keep the un-fused path between the breakers and inverter as short as possible, saves valuable wall real estate, not to mention money. Maybe the mini breakers will be less convenient to access, but how often are you blowing them? They're pretty much emergency only.
It's a good thing we are convoying together because you're going to need some help when you burn your place down! HaHa
 

hilld

Well-known member
Are you actually considering 4 AC circuits? I think of my kitchen having all of its counter outlets on a single breaker and it seems like even two circuits in a van would be plenty.

Why not just mount a couple of these to one of the surfaces on your electrical cabinet? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000K2IKMI

That also allows you to keep the un-fused path between the breakers and inverter as short as possible, saves valuable wall real estate, not to mention money. Maybe the mini breakers will be less convenient to access, but how often are you blowing them? They're pretty much emergency only.
Yes, considering multiple circuits. 1 for the outside outlet (off unless actually using it), 1 for the Isotemp, 1 for the microwave (in case I end up with a clock and 1 for the remaining outlets. I already have the Blue Sea panel, so that is sunk cost.

I think it if was just me, I would probably do with something less obvious, however, my brother and his family will also use the van, so a more conventional approach is appropriate. I don't want to be tech support at 11pm when something doesn't work and they can't find the breaker. :thumbup:
 

hilld

Well-known member
I see you have all your fuses in the Lynx distributor. I read the entire book on the MPPT, 13 pages, and missed the fuse size for the charge controller. Would it be the Max. PV short circuit current, 60 A? I have the 100/50 MPPT.

I was wanting to read about connecting the Blue Sea battery disconnect switch- 9004e. Do you remember where you got that information about using it with the alternator field disconnect?
For the lines from the PV panels to the MPPT, I will be using a double pole disconnect rated at 16A, the fuse on the Lynx is a 100A fuse (smallest mega fuse I could find). That fuse is really there to protect the wiring, in case the wire falls out and shorts something.

The 9004e uses 2 additional terminals, hopefully this installation doc is helpful. https://d2pyqm2yd3fw2i.cloudfront.net/files/resources/instructions/6994.pdf

also this

Small excerpt from the above link:

The AFD is constructed in such a way that the AFD switch does not close until slightly after the main switch contacts have closed and it opens slightly before the main switch contacts open. This insures that there will always be a path for the alternator's output current when the alternator is producing power. The field disconnect will only work on alternators with an external regulator.
 

johnplyler

Active member
The 16A double pole breaker you say you have between the solar panels and the MPPT doesn't sound right??? I am thinking it should be more like 40 amp. Don't you have a 60 amp. MPPT? Nate in that video used a 40 amp. breaker I believe.

I got the Victron Inverter/Charger for the sole reason that you could hook up shore power, battery power, and solar power all at once. The inverter/charger would figure out what power goes where and I didn't have to worry about it! If I needed more than the 30 amp. shore power, it would take it from the battery or solar to make it up.

I went with this small combo AC/DC panel because is going to be the smallest foot print you can have.
 

hilld

Well-known member
My panel puts out 400W at 50V, so that means the current is 8A on the PV input side of the MPPT. The 16A breaker is more than adequate. Hope that makes sense. Now the fuse going from the MPPT to the Lynx distributor is at 12-13V, so the amperage for the same 400W is now around 35A. Hope that makes sense.
 

johnplyler

Active member
I think I finally got my Solar Disconnect figured out. Your MC4 connectors are only rated to 30 amps. so you need to design your array to be less than that............. But your disconnect breaker needs to be larger than the short circuit current, in my case with a MPPT 100/50 is 60 amps. Nate states this in his Youtube (time stamp 7 minutes)
They make a 63 amp breaker so I got that.
 

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