Sterling b2b connections

autostaretx

Erratic Member
I believe the VS30 has a current-detecting shunt attached to the negative post in the starter battery box.
The red light could be the Sprinter trying to tell you that the alternator is not producing power when asked to
(perhaps known by the shunt not registering adequate current)
Perhaps your additions are "stealing" current and the Sprinter is noticing?

If you look in the lower left corner of that last photo i posted, you can see two small wires connected to the (not quite) red and shiny copper thing that is attached to the negative post. That's the shunt.
Try disconnecting *only* the BtoB's negative connection to the Sprinter side of the game. See if the light goes off.
If it does not, disconnect the BtoB's positive connection too.
If the light still stays on, something may have happened to your charging circuit (alternator or control).

Before disconnecting things, test the Sprinter's "12v" supply when the engine is running ... it should climb to over 13.5 volts (at least soon after the engine starts ... it may drop to 13.2 after a while).
If it never exceeds 12.7 volts, the alternator is not producing current.

--dick
 
So here are a couple of pictures of what I ended up doing. I tied into position #6 of the distribution block under the driver's seat. I had to fabricate a copper bar to extend to where I could fit the Littlefuse in-line MIDI fuse holder. One picture with fuse holder cover off and one with it on.
 

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kper

Member
So here are a couple of pictures of what I ended up doing. I tied into position #6 of the distribution block under the driver's seat. I had to fabricate a copper bar to extend to where I could fit the Littlefuse in-line MIDI fuse holder. One picture with fuse holder cover off and one with it on.
That is very similar to what I did. Hammered some copper pipe flat to make a bridge and ran off of post #6 (I had both 6 and 7 empty). I ran direct to a 100A circuit breaker housed inside the seat pedestal, which I can reach with the seat on.

I don't have enough consumers to discharge the house batteries, so on my one and only test run, the b2b sat on float the entire time. Hopefully this is just because my batteries are full and everything is working properly. Time will tell...
 

whyNOwagons?

New member
Makes sense, thank you. My thought from looking at it was the #4 was bringing power in from the battery and the other slots are for whatever they are powering. Along those lines, the idea was to add a jumper to one of the empty slots and use it to power the BB1260. But wasn't sure if someone knew why this might be a poor or suboptimal choice relative to just tapping into the power distribution block that is generally recommended.

The reason I like this location if it works, is that you can run a cable to a fuse and then easily exit the driver's seat to run back to the rear of the van where my house battery setup will be.
Any success with this? Feels far cleaner and easier than fabricating bars inside of the F150 as so many do and recommend. Adding an inline fuse and an available post is easy peasy.

I plan to tap #6 and route through the chase to build out B2B setup under the passenger seat. Of course inline fuses throughout.

Thanks y'all!
 

kper

Member
I tapped #6 and it is working well. I had to flatten a little piece of copper pipe to bridge across the posts since I didn't have (or want) a fuse there. Ran from there to a 100a circuit breaker and then to my electrical cabinet. Haven't logged a ton of test hours, but seeing +/-45amps in bulk charging which sounds like it is what I should expect based on a conversation with the folks at sterling.
 

whyNOwagons?

New member
I tapped #6 and it is working well. I had to flatten a little piece of copper pipe to bridge across the posts since I didn't have (or want) a fuse there. Ran from there to a 100a circuit breaker and then to my electrical cabinet. Haven't logged a ton of test hours, but seeing +/-45amps in bulk charging which sounds like it is what I should expect based on a conversation with the folks at sterling.
Sorry but don't understand why you needed a bridge. It's a bus right? So the posts are fed by bus from the high amp inputs? My #6 is constant 12v and unoccupied.
 

kper

Member
Sorry but don't understand why you needed a bridge. It's a bus right? So the posts are fed by bus from the high amp inputs? My #6 is constant 12v and unoccupied.
They are meant to use an in-line fuse. I either had no fuse or didn't want to use the fuse (can't remember which) - so I used the copper pipe to make a direct connection.
 

whyNOwagons?

New member
They are meant to use an in-line fuse. I either had no fuse or didn't want to use the fuse (can't remember which) - so I used the copper pipe to make a direct connection.
Which posts did you bridge w/ the copper? If you're pulling from #6 was it not already hot? If I understand your setup, a terminal ring on post #6 to your breaker wouldn't require a bridge, unless yours is cold and I got lucky.
 

forlexinotme

New member
On my van terminal #6 (visible in the pictures above) came from the factory with an 80 amp MIDI fuse. This fuse is hidden beneath the plastic cover. If you took the cover off you would see the fuse. I would assume this is what is allowing power to flow to the copper bar and the secondary fuse holder that was installed.
 

kper

Member
On my van terminal #6 (visible in the pictures above) came from the factory with an 80 amp MIDI fuse. This fuse is hidden beneath the plastic cover. If you took the cover off you would see the fuse. I would assume this is what is allowing power to flow to the copper bar and the secondary fuse holder that was installed.
Same. I ditched the fuse and went with the copper bridge. 80a fuse probably would have worked fine, but I didn't want it to blow and have to dig through everything to get to it. Swapped it out for a 100a breaker in-line.
 

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