Esp and asr lights on

Bobnoxious

Made in the USA Qualité Supérieure
ESP (sub systems) ABS, ARS, etc won't function potentially creating an unsafe event.

I don't believe it'll cause any further electronica/mechanical problems.
 

Aaron T

New member
ESP (sub systems) ABS, ARS, etc won't function potentially creating an unsafe event.

I don't believe it'll cause any further electronica/mechanical problems.
Thanks Bob, that's what I thought ,I'll get it fixed eventually but needed confirmation that I can hold of and not cause more serious damage in the meantime, cheers and thanks for the input.
 

Aaron T

New member
You will probably be in limp mode with reduced power if that matters.
Hi, it got delivered to me via a 9hr drive from Sydney to Melbourne where its being stored while I covert it into a camper ,I haven't had it on the open road myself yet so don't know if its in limp mode and the guy who delivers it didn't say anything ,what can I expect with limp mode and how do I rectify if that's the case?, cheers
 

Aussie 2002 4x4

Active member
When I had a bad wheel sensor the warning lights were on but no limp mode or anything noticeable for normal driving. An (mb appropriate) scanner let me know which one was faulty). After clearing the codes the lights would come back on and stay on as soon as I got to about 35km/h. Spliced in a new sensor and all good.
 

owner

Well-known member
Sometimes its hard to know you are in limp mode. Especially if you aren't used to driving big vans you may just think its normal.

The van will have low boost and may or may not short-shift the trans if its an auto. But you would need to have a lot of experience of the normal mode of operation to be able to tell.

The main trigger point for me is pulling away from standstill on an incline. If the van seems to struggle to gain speed and seema to fall behind the rest of the traffic, and short-shifts (if auto) right when you think you are starting to reach normal levels of accel, thats a silent limp mode and you will have codes.

Note that you can basically drive the car as if its perfectly normal in all other circumstances. It just the pulling away on an uphill that it really shows up.
 

Aaron T

New member
When I had a bad wheel sensor the warning lights were on but no limp mode or anything noticeable for normal driving. An (mb appropriate) scanner let me know which one was faulty). After clearing the codes the lights would come back on and stay on as soon as I got to about 35km/h. Spliced in a new sensor and all good.
Thanks for the info , I've been looking at scanners and think it would be a good investment to have ,any suggestions and reasonably priced of course, cheers .
 

Aaron T

New member
Sometimes its hard to know you are in limp mode. Especially if you aren't used to driving big vans you may just think its normal.

The van will have low boost and may or may not short-shift the trans if its an auto. But you would need to have a lot of experience of the normal mode of operation to be able to tell.

The main trigger point for me is pulling away from standstill on an incline. If the van seems to struggle to gain speed and seema to fall behind the rest of the traffic, and short-shifts (if auto) right when you think you are starting to reach normal levels of accel, thats a silent limp mode and you will have codes.

Note that you can basically drive the car as if its perfectly normal in all other circumstances. It just the pulling away on an uphill that it really shows up.
Thanks for the info this helps to give me a better picture of what might be going on and lessens my worry , this site is awesome! and will always be my first point of call ,cheers for all the help and suggestions guys!!!.
 

Karl Benz

Member
Icar Soft MB V 2.0. All of the above is correct. Possibly a wheel speed sensor or a brake light switch but my $$ wd be on the #5 fuse. Make sure it has not been completely removed from its holder. The van would be in trans limp mode....you would certainly know if it was. Stuck in 2nd gear and very slow reverse. Buy yourself an OBD....money well spent.
 

jaahn

Member
Hi :)
This is a generic answer not MB specific. LIMP mode (as it is called) is not just a standard mode the ECU goes into if it sees any problem. It is more complex than that. If the ECU detects a problem it looks at the parameters related to that problem, in its memory bank ,and decides what is the response. Usually the first is put on a warning light. Then it decides if damage will be caused by the problem or not. Depending on the information found it will decide on any more actions. This may involve reduced power or reduced engine revs or even shutting down the engine or indeed it may just put the warning lights on the dash. For instance one faulty sensor reading may be replaced by an 'average' substitution reading to give reasonable performance to keep driving safely and a 'check engine light'. :sneaky:
It is a graded response depending on the pre-programed answers in memory. So the classic limp home mode is usually the second last response. The last response is stopped. All the measurements of sensors and problems found are stored in memory for future scanning. But sometimes a genuine factory scanner is required to look at them. The factory guards their information !! A cheap scanner may not reveal much and better ones may not reveal all that is stored in memory. :smirk:
Jaahn
 
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