Outdoor hot/cold shower faucet wanted with combined valve/switch

Bernd Pfrommer

New member
Our kitchen and bathroom sinks in the Westy have these nifty faucets that combine valve and electrical switch, such that the water pump switches on at the same time the valve opens. I'm looking for a similar faucet, but maybe smaller so I can squeeze it between back wall and door for an outdoor hot/cold shower.

Does anybody know how to find them? I didn't have much luck with the search engines. Why do I get such few hits on a search? One would think other class B's work similarly. Or do they use an expansion tank (like a well water system) so there is no need for an electrical switch on every faucet?

Any pointers are appreciated!
 

Kiltym

'05 Westy
The electrical connection for faucets is a bit odd. Seems more of a European thing. Most water systems on rv's/boats use a pressure switched pump that runs automatically when the pressure drops (faucet opened) and no electrical connections are then needed. To me, it is a better way to go, but Westfalia uses the switches. I would search on Europe websites to get the largest selection of compatible faucets.

You can easily get hot water at the existing outdoor outlet using a combiner as the hot water line is right there and easy to T into. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FAGWKTC/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_3?smid=A3MIOYS8UTTO6U&psc=1 There is a thread on here somewhere of people adding hot water to the outdoor shower, but it will use the manual switch in back and the existing outlet.
 
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Bernd Pfrommer

New member
Thanks for the great suggestion @Kiltym.
Running a google search in German ("wasserhahn mit schalter wohnwagen") turned up much better hits. This one for instance should work

I saw the mixing valve design for hot water in the rear shower on the sprinter forum:
https://sprinter-source.com/forums/index.php?threads/41531/
But if possible I also want to eliminate the manual switch.
 

Riptide

Member
I've pondered this off and on over the years. Given the very limited amount of space there is to work with back there, my plan was to keep the manual switch, and just add a mixing valve setup. Putting a faucet back there now requires me to either add isolation valves so that if the faucet handle lifts while I'm traveling, the water pump doesn't start, or put a switch in to "shut off" the faucet.

Besides, for the few times I would actually use it, I want to keep things simple. Some time ago, I bought a small brass mixing setup that I planned to use, but just haven't gotten around to executing. As kilty said, tapping into the hot water supply should be easy.
 

OffroadHamster

Active member
Is your concern that you dont want the system pressurized all the time? Most RV pumps have a pressure switch that shuts the pump off automatically when the system is pressurized, and then turns it back on when it drops below a certain threshold. IE it automatically kicks on when you open a faucet or line somewhere.

+1 on the thermostatic mixing valve. I use one to mix 140 deg water with my cold tank down to 100 deg for outdoor shower. Works great.
 

Bernd Pfrommer

New member
Here's my setup, posted on a different thread:
Pressure testing will have to wait for warmer temperatures.
 

Bernd Pfrommer

New member
Is your concern that you dont want the system pressurized all the time? Most RV pumps have a pressure switch that shuts the pump off automatically when the system is pressurized, and then turns it back on when it drops below a certain threshold. IE it automatically kicks on when you open a faucet or line somewhere.

+1 on the thermostatic mixing valve. I use one to mix 140 deg water with my cold tank down to 100 deg for outdoor shower. Works great.
Our Westies work differently: they have a micro switch at each faucet (and the toilet) which switches on the pump when there is demand. I don't really know what the advantage is (not needing an expansion tank, no risk of water leakage?). But it means that you have to get a special faucet with an embedded electrical switch.
 

OffroadHamster

Active member
Interesting. I can see the advantage for sure. No risk of water leakage is big. I usually leave my pump off. The single time I didnt (a couple months ago), there was a small drip at one of the fittings. By the time I realized it two cabinet doors were ruined and mold had set in :(

Maybe a NC momentary switch behind the shower head? Pull head forward to release the switch and close the circuit?

The disadvantage of a primed system...
 

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