Insulation - side panels and ceiling

Plantsoma

New member
I'm looking at insulation options. The butyl rubber adhesive marketed for car sound insulation is expensive. A friend is using expandable foam for inside the side walls. Is there any reason why this wouldn't be a good idea? It's much more cost effective and easy to get into gaps. I was then planning on lining the roof ceiling and plywood panels with polycell, over the expandable foam.
Does this seem reasonable, or is there a reason this shouldn't be done. (links to products I'm considering below)
Thanks. šŸ˜Š

https://www.bunnings.com.au/bostik-expanda-foam-500ml-expanding-foam-filler_p0015379

 
The first problem with expandable foam I can think of, is it could make repairs in the future an added nightmare in removing the foam to make a repair.
 
Hi Plantsoma...There's heaps of threads about expanding foam ... one that springs to mind was about the panels expanding and contracting at a different rate to the foam and oil canning. Patrick
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
 

Midwestdrifter

Engineer In Residence
A sheet of cardboard between the van skin and the foam is the best way to prevent any possible warping of the panels. Personally I'm a fan of using rigid foam panels adhered to the body skin and then filling any gaps with your preferred insulation.
 

timcass

New member
We just applied Lizard Skin ceramic insulation 'paint' to the ceiling, cargo area sides, side door, and back doors. Now will add 1/2 inch poly near our sleeping area and then add Thinsulate throughout the sides and ceiling as well as the rear and side doors.
At first we discussed spray in insulation but could not find an applicator in our area. Surprising enough that the Lizard Skin truly does lower the interior temps significantly. https://lizardskin.com/
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
We just applied Lizard Skin ceramic insulation 'paint' to the ceiling, cargo area sides, side door, and back doors. Now will add 1/2 inch poly near our sleeping area and then add Thinsulate throughout the sides and ceiling as well as the rear and side doors.
At first we discussed spray in insulation but could not find an applicator in our area. Surprising enough that the Lizard Skin truly does lower the interior temps significantly. https://lizardskin.com/
Lizard skin looks like an excellent product. My only concern is proper surface preparation to insure optimal product adhesion to host material.

Many interior areas are with cavity wax, I am confident would act as a release agent.

My experience, the easiest method to thoroughly remove cavity wax is a hot water pressure washer with degreaser.
 

daws314

New member
I'm looking at insulation options. The butyl rubber adhesive marketed for car sound insulation is expensive. A friend is using expandable foam for inside the side walls. Is there any reason why this wouldn't be a good idea? It's much more cost effective and easy to get into gaps. I was then planning on lining the roof ceiling and plywood panels with polycell, over the expandable foam.
Does this seem reasonable, or is there a reason this shouldn't be done. (links to products I'm considering below)
Thanks. šŸ˜Š

https://www.bunnings.com.au/bostik-expanda-foam-500ml-expanding-foam-filler_p0015379

Butyl rubber is not cheap but it works with the absolute minimum of fuss. Remember that you don't need to cover all of the panel for the dampening to be effective.
 

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