Truma flashes twice quickly

Peter Tourin

2012 LTV Unity MB
We just picked up a 2020 RL at Van City in Las Vegas and weʻre driving home. Since there are a lot of new features, Iʻm sure Iʻm going to have a bunch of newbie questions - and hereʻs the first...
Weʻve had hot water, but this evening we donʻt. I left the knob control on Comfort when we left the campsite this morning, with the water pump on. This evening weʻre still on pump water. When I opened the utility panel door I found that the round knob was flashing quickly twice: flash-flash-pause, flash-flash-pause, etc. Iʻve turned the Truma off and on several times, going to either Comfort or Eco, and every time I get the same flashing pattern.

Weʻre on shore power, and itʻs good. Our LP is around 65% and pressure appears to be OK - at least, the stove lights easily with a good flame and after driving all day the fridge is still cool.

I donʻt see any mention of a pattern in the manual thatʻs like what weʻre seeing - can anyone tell me what it means?
 

HoloHolo

'19/18 LTV Unity(MB)
Try this: 1) Turn switch in control panel to OFF. 2) Open the Truma cover on the outside of your rig and flip the switch on the unit to OFF. Wait a minute. 3) Flip switch on Truma back ON (either up or down, doesn't matter). 4) Turn Truma on from control panel. This has worked for many with that problem and I've needed to do it once, then no further problems.
 

Peter Tourin

2012 LTV Unity MB
Well thanks - that worked! - now I can go holoholo with a clean face <g>...
Mike, thanks for the link - Iʻll go do some reading - since my MB was a 2012, the Truma is one of the new things for me, along with the IoT system.
 

Klipstr

2018 Wonder FTB
And if the problem persists I have an excellent contact at Truma if LTV can't get 'er done. Don't want to use her too much at this point but the damn Truma has been the only thing in our coach that doesn't work correctly all the time (except for me of course).
 

Unity Traveler

2013 LTV Unity Twin Bed
Well thanks - that worked! - now I can go holoholo with a clean face <g>...
Mike, thanks for the link - Iʻll go do some reading - since my MB was a 2012, the Truma is one of the new things for me, along with the IoT system.
You just picked up Unity RL at Van City - Curious how you like the Rear Lounge on your trip home? We ordered a 2021 Wonder Rear Lounge (Gasser) after seeing Dean's video on the new Wonder RL Gasser & sold us.
We ordered ours from Van City, St. Louis in April & they were able to switch a TB to a RL that has a production date of August 12th. Hoping that date holds & no delays. We will be putting our 2013 Unity TB for sale in a month or so. But yes, would love to hear how you like the RL & your new Unity.


Well thanks - that worked! - now I can go holoholo with a clean face <g>...
Mike, thanks for the link - Iʻll go do some reading - since my MB was a 2012, the Truma is one of the new things for me, along with the IoT system.
 

Peter Tourin

2012 LTV Unity MB
Truma report: weʻve been good once we found out about the reset sequence. Weʻve had to do it twice more. I wonder if the Truma has problems if itʻs left on while you drive - we always have had to reset it after a drive during which we left it on.

The RL: So far weʻve enjoyed it a lot. Weʻre camping right now, and Jean is sleeping in the back while I sit up front and type. Having the separate areas will be very nice for longer trips. Of course, there are several prices to pay for that. One is the small bathroom space, which is an especially big change from our MB. The shower is nicely set up and very usable, though very small - if youʻre a wide sort of person, youʻll definitely want to step into one before making the plunge. The bathroom is small - the sink bowl is very small and the faucet is relatively large, but most of us have been in RVs with tight facilities, and I think this will work well enough for us - a fair trade.

In general, the 2019 chassis has a lot of improvements and not too many drawbacks. Handles well off the shelf, many of the assists work very well, the touch screen is very useful - much more information available at your fingertips. Iʻm still trying to figure out how to make best use of it!

The front seats work well. The passenger seat is very flexible when rotated. The driver seat is a bit less so - it hits the left front galley seat or the seat armrest hits the drivers door armrest if you try to rotate it most of the way around. But itʻs enough so you can sit 4 people in a group.

Exterior storage is better than I expected - 2 big compartments, 2 smaller ones. Thereʻs no really big compartment, and weʻll be needing to thin out some items that we used to carry in the MB, but not too many.

There are lots of other things I could mention, some very cool, others that Iʻll be trying to figure out how to change. Iʻd say the main area to think over is interior storage. The MB had a lot of shelf/drawer space for clothing and possessions - this has less, so weʻll have to figure out how to bring less. But I think weʻll figure that out. The bathroom has little storage and there arenʻt many places to hang towels. Iʻm sure weʻll also find solutions for these problems. There are a few open tall shelves in the bathroom - Iʻd rather have more open shelves - we donʻt need the height as much as we need extra shelves for small items. Weʻll figure this out once Iʻm at home with my shop available. The biggest lack is in kitchen storage space. There is just not much of it! The drop-down counter is a great addition, as it gives much needed extra prep space. But with a half height pantry, storage is very limited. Iʻm already thinking that rather than 1 shallow drawer and 2 tall ones, I may want to change the middle tall drawer into 2 short ones like the top drawer. I also want to find out from LTV why the space under the sink is marked "not for storage". There are things in there - Truma heater and water pump - but it looks like a removable raised shelf in there would gain some extra storage.

Please remember - these are very much first impressions, as weʻve only been on one trip, from Las Vegas to St. Louis so far. Iʻm sure our thinking will evolve and our ideas for how to best use the spaces will change. But these are our first impressions. Wonderful new chassis, nice not to have a slide, rear sleeping/lounging area is great, especially for extended camping. But in order to do extended camping comfortably, weʻll have to figure out how to maximize existing storage and make some improvements, especially in the galley.
 

Unity Traveler

2013 LTV Unity Twin Bed
Truma report: weʻve been good once we found out about the reset sequence. Weʻve had to do it twice more. I wonder if the Truma has problems if itʻs left on while you drive - we always have had to reset it after a drive during which we left it on.

The RL: So far weʻve enjoyed it a lot. Weʻre camping right now, and Jean is sleeping in the back while I sit up front and type. Having the separate areas will be very nice for longer trips. Of course, there are several prices to pay for that. One is the small bathroom space, which is an especially big change from our MB. The shower is nicely set up and very usable, though very small - if youʻre a wide sort of person, youʻll definitely want to step into one before making the plunge. The bathroom is small - the sink bowl is very small and the faucet is relatively large, but most of us have been in RVs with tight facilities, and I think this will work well enough for us - a fair trade.

In general, the 2019 chassis has a lot of improvements and not too many drawbacks. Handles well off the shelf, many of the assists work very well, the touch screen is very useful - much more information available at your fingertips. Iʻm still trying to figure out how to make best use of it!

The front seats work well. The passenger seat is very flexible when rotated. The driver seat is a bit less so - it hits the left front galley seat or the seat armrest hits the drivers door armrest if you try to rotate it most of the way around. But itʻs enough so you can sit 4 people in a group.

Exterior storage is better than I expected - 2 big compartments, 2 smaller ones. Thereʻs no really big compartment, and weʻll be needing to thin out some items that we used to carry in the MB, but not too many.

There are lots of other things I could mention, some very cool, others that Iʻll be trying to figure out how to change. Iʻd say the main area to think over is interior storage. The MB had a lot of shelf/drawer space for clothing and possessions - this has less, so weʻll have to figure out how to bring less. But I think weʻll figure that out. The bathroom has little storage and there arenʻt many places to hang towels. Iʻm sure weʻll also find solutions for these problems. There are a few open tall shelves in the bathroom - Iʻd rather have more open shelves - we donʻt need the height as much as we need extra shelves for small items. Weʻll figure this out once Iʻm at home with my shop available. The biggest lack is in kitchen storage space. There is just not much of it! The drop-down counter is a great addition, as it gives much needed extra prep space. But with a half height pantry, storage is very limited. Iʻm already thinking that rather than 1 shallow drawer and 2 tall ones, I may want to change the middle tall drawer into 2 short ones like the top drawer. I also want to find out from LTV why the space under the sink is marked "not for storage". There are things in there - Truma heater and water pump - but it looks like a removable raised shelf in there would gain some extra storage.

Please remember - these are very much first impressions, as weʻve only been on one trip, from Las Vegas to St. Louis so far. Iʻm sure our thinking will evolve and our ideas for how to best use the spaces will change. But these are our first impressions. Wonderful new chassis, nice not to have a slide, rear sleeping/lounging area is great, especially for extended camping. But in order to do extended camping comfortably, weʻll have to figure out how to maximize existing storage and make some improvements, especially in the galley.
Thanks Peter for the information provided on the RL - A couple of other questions, is the bed comfortable & plenty of room for two people? Also, I'm sure you have the Lithium Batteries, being new to Lithium, I understand LTV has a heated box for the batteries. Is this box heated only when the temperature drops to a certain level & what about when in storage in Winter? My wife & I both use C-Pap machines, so will the 2000 Amp Converter/Lithium be plenty during the night to run the C-Paps thru the night? What about location of Inverted outlets in the bedroom? Are all the outlets Inverted? We have inside storage, but no outlets to connect. The temperature I don't think drops below freezing much inside, but what are the parameters we need to know on temperature/batteries?
 

Peter Tourin

2012 LTV Unity MB
The bed is still open to debate. The mattress is nearly queen size - Iʻd have to measure to be positive, but our queen sheets fit it well enough. Jean says that actual measurements are on the website. The mattress is firm - I find it comfortable, Jeanʻs not so sure. There wouldnʻt be room for a topper - the bed wouldnʻt latch when raised with a topper on it, so youʻd have to store the topper somewhere during the day.

My last RV was a ʻ12 MB and I retrofitted to lithium. They were wonderful - lots of capacity! I couldnʻt order this RL with lithium - LTV is just now starting to build with lithiums and this rig was on order for the better part of a year even though we just picked it up last week. The dealer would have installed lithiums for me as a retrofit but they wouldnʻt keep the AGMs, so I would have to have driven from Las Vegas to Vermont with the old batteries in a storage compartment and then sell them. So I decided to wait and do it myself later. Iʻll probably use the OEM batteries hard and replace them with lithiums when they start to get weary. You can certainly draw regular batteries down way below the 50% that people often quote - it reduces their life somewhat, but thatʻs OK with me - shorter life in trade for more capacity.

Do you know how much power your CPAPs need? Look on their rating plate - if you can tell me what theyʻre rated, I can tell you more about what youʻll need, and there are other members who use CPAPs and can talk from experience if you post asking specifically about CPAP use. The inverter is certainly big enough - the real question is about battery capacity. Not all outlets are inverted, but most are - the 2 outlets at the back by the bed are both inverted.

I donʻt know yet what LTVʻs lithium installation will be, but I can talk about lithiums in general. Big advantages: they charge fast and well, they maintain their health without having to be fully recharged - charging is generally simpler than with flooded cells. They maintain their voltage better as they discharge - the voltage stays high (like over 13.0 volts) until they are almost fully discharged, then the voltage plummets suddenly. So 12v appliances run well on lithiums. You can run them down very low without damaging the chemistry - no problem running them down to 20% SOC.

The temperature issue relates to charging, and it concerns the battery chemistry, not the ambient temperature. You can discharge the batteries when the chemistry is below freezing, but charging them when the chemistry is below freezing can damage them. So I assume that LTV senses the temp at the battery terminals and turns on heating pads if the temp there gets too low - you only need the heating pads when the battery temp is likely to be below freezing. Also, note that when you use the batteries, the temp of the chemistry rises. So unless youʻre going to do a lot of very cold weather camping, youʻre not likely to run into cold problems with the lithiums.

Lithium batteries store well. They can be stored in cold weather. They have a very low rate of self-discharge - I used to store my MB in Vermont for 4 months in an unheated warehouse - I simply unhooked the negative cable from the lithium batteries for the winter and hooked it up again in the spring. Same thing for the chassis battery, by the way - I made sure it was fully charged, then unhooked it with the Mercedes disconnect by the accelerator pedal - in the spring I hooked it up again and the RV started right up.
 

mikeme

2015 LTV IB: 2015 3500 V6
...My wife & I both use C-Pap machines, so will the 2000 Amp Converter/Lithium be plenty during the night to run the C-Paps thru the night? ....

When planning power use, it is a good idea to measure actual power use, rather than go by ratings. There are many different models, and different power consumption depending on what settings and how long you use it.

http://www.p3international.com/products/p4400.html Is a great tool to have.

You would plug the power monitor into a wall outlet, plug your CPAP into the monitor,
and then use as usual.

After your period of use (the next morning), you can read the KWH (1,000 watt-hours) used, which then can be translated to an expected AMP-Hour drain of the RV power system in use. (Estimation of Battery Amp-Hours used from the KWH reading will need to include the inefficiencies of the inverter, so you cannot just divide WattHours (WH) by 12 Volts to get AmpHours) Multiplying the KWH reading by 100 should get you close on an AMP Hour use estimate from the 12 Volt House battery.
 
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Peter Tourin

2012 LTV Unity MB
What Mike said, in spades! Those Kill-a-Watts are cheap and very handy. You can test the CPAPs in the house and see what power they draw in real life. Iʻve done checked the actual draw of all my electrical items in the RV. Usually the real-life power draw will be less than the rated draw on the appliance label - often a lot less. So the Kill-a-Watt pretty much always brings you good news. For example, my LP furnace is rated at 7 amps but draws around 3.6.
 

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