2005 p0087

HazyOutdoor

New member
Hello All,

I have a 2005 Sprinter with 315k. Bought recently and drive/runs well. Previous owner replaced HP pump and all injectors. Started having a p0087 (low fuel rail pressure) code, using a iCarsoft reader. Replaced fuel filter with no improvement of code. Heard a loud noise from under the floor and suspected the in tank pump. Checked fuel pressure after the fuel filter and was getting ~50psi reading. Replaced the in-tank pump and now getting 70psi. Cleared the code and drove some more. The code returned with heavy acceleration, p0087. Did a leak off test and all seem pretty even. No one injector higher than the others. Check the MAF with guidance from Florida Van Man YouTube video and all good there. Drove the van again after clearing the code and continue to get p0087 under hard acceleration. Freeze frame from iCarsoft shows the code happens at 99.2% load, 19,844psi, and 2881 rpm. Last idea is it the fuel rail/sensor. Wanting to hear some opinions before making the purchase of a new fuel rail. They are pricey.
 

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sailquik

Well-known member
HazyOutdoor,
OK, 99.25% engine Load; 19,844 PSI rail pressure; 2881 RPM, in which gear and
at how many MPH?
You realize that (given a little tolerance) you are pulling every bit of power that your
OM-647 had the ability to make (when it was brand new) out of your engine, right?
How many miles on your Sprinter?
Are you just trying to make sure you don't get any codes/faults/LHM episodes when
you run your engine at it's absolute max. everything?
Maximum boost pressure, maximum fuel flow and fuel pressure, temperatures (coolant
and trans fluid temps here) are beginning to rise quickly.
Or, do you just want to drive your 2005 Sprinter more normally?
Have you considered manually downshifting to reduce the % engine Load?
Have you checked your GPH (fuel flow) to see that it has doubled or possibly tripled
over what it would take to get up that same grade in a lower gear and a sightly slower
speed.
Assuming you are in top gear (5th gear...OVERDRIVE.... 0.83 :1 ratio) would put you
@ ~> 70+ mph in top gear (guessing here as I no longer have a T1N to check this) why
not slow down to ~ 65 MPH and manually downshift into 4th gear (1 : 1 Ratio) at
~500 RPM > than 5th gear OVERDRIVE.
Might actually be nothing really wrong, you are just trying to wring more power out of
your older engine than it currently has the ability to make.
New HP Pump/new fuel rail/new fuel rail pressure regulator/new (or Bosch tested)
fuel injectors could restore your engine to give it back it's ability to run at > 100%
for short periods of time, but why waste all the fuel it takes just to prove that your
engine can indeed run at 100% for longer periods of time.
Only you can make those choices.
Roger
 

HazyOutdoor

New member
Thanks for the reply Sailquik,

The first time the code occured I was pulling out onto a busy street and giving it (in my opinion) 50% throttle. After all the repairs (LP pump, HP pump, fuel filter, injectors) I've made so far I've been testing it by pulling out on to streets and giving it heavier throttle to test if the code occurs again So, yes I am pushing it harder than I would normally drive. There are 315k miles on the vehicle/engine. The code that occured in the pictures above was on flat road going from a rolling start and giving ~75% throttle to test if the code happens. I was doing 28mph in 2nd or 3rd gear. I'll clear the code and drive it around town under normal driving conditions. I don't find that to be a fix to the issue. Weather the engine is old or not the flow of fuel should still be available for the engine to use? Why would a older engine cause a low fuel rail pressure code? What will happen when I'm driving on inclines and I have a load in the van? I would not want to go into limp mode while driving on an incline.
 

sailquik

Well-known member
Probably time to visit an authorized MB Sprinter dealer or a Sprinter specialty shop with
the full diagnostic capability and have them run the diagnostics to check ALL the fuel system parameters.
As you suspect, it could be the pressure regulator on the fuel rail, or perhaps something
with the fuel rail itself.
Thanks for clearing up the exact situations under which this fault occurs!
I had something similar when I was driving my 2006 T1N with the OM-647 5 cylinder and 5G-Tronic/NAG-1 transmission, only worse.
At times, under various throttle positions, it would simply quit.
Changed out the ECM (under warranty) but never really completely solved the problem.
My biggest fear was that I would go over one of the several high bridges I travel all the time and have it quit completely (needed to come to a complete stop, turn off the key, then restart to clear the fault) and have a big truck or some other vehicle come over the top of the bridge @ 50 mph and me sitting there at zero MPH getting the engine cranked up again.
Scary!
Roger
 

jrod5150

Active member
The fuel quantity valve is typically the culprit with low pressure codes. But I believe it comes with the hpfp when bought new, and you said you replaced it. If you have replaced the quantity valve, hpfp, lp, and all injectors, than the only thing left is the fuel rail which has both sensors, or you have a damaged harness/bad ground.
 
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HazyOutdoor

New member
Thanks for the replies.

I did a Fuel Solenoid test today by clamping the fuel return lines from the injectors, placing the clear tubes on fuel returns from the injectors, disconnecting the cam position sensor, and placing a clear line on the fuel return from the fuel solenoid. Fuel returned from the solenoid when turning the engine over indicating the solenoid is not closed during cranking and not functioning properly? Thoughts?
 

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DRTDEVL

Active member
I had the same problem a couple years ago. IIRC, after new injectors and a quantity control valve, most of my problems went away... but there was a nagging P0087 under certain conditions, and almost always when towing. I put in the HPFP from my parts van, and it behaved the same.

Replacing the fuel rail fixed it.
 

HazyOutdoor

New member
Thanks for the feed back. Just ordered the rail...... 💸💸💸. Anyone know of detailed instructions on replacing the rail? Or a video?

I will update once replaced and let you all know if it has fixed my issue.
 

DRTDEVL

Active member
The rail is simple.

Remove injector cover.
Unplug the rail pressure sensor and pressure regulator.
Loosen all the fuel lines at the injector end.
Remove fuel line fittings on rail end.
Loosen fuel line at HPFP.
Remove fuel line fitting on rail.
Remove fuel return line.
Remove three bolts holding rail in place.

Installation is the reverse.

Turn the ignition on for about 15 seconds without trying to start and then turn it back off. Repeat three times to prime the rail, then start the engine.

This is off the top of my head, though... I'd need to look at one of my spare rails out in the shop to jog my memory.
 

jrod5150

Active member
The explanation of the R&R above is good. its a pretty easy swap out. I cant comment regarding the rail test. I have probably four rails on the shelf for testing purposes...
 

autostaretx

Erratic Member

HazyOutdoor

New member
Hi All,

Replaced the rail yesterday. Removal of the rail was pretty straight forward. Blew out the fuel lines as i removed them. Placed the new rail in. Took some turning over to clear the air out of the lines but eventually turned over and running. Checked on the lines and connections before driving and everything looked good. Cleared the previous p0087 code. Drove the van ~ 8 miles and had the psi up to ~22000 at one point. Never had the code trip. Van is running very well. Noticed that the average PSI while driving is higher than with the old rail. Going to drive it more this week and get it on the highway to be sure all is good. Thanks for all the advice and information provided.IMG_7345.jpg
 
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