Corrosion Front Wheel Well - How to Fix and Dealer Advice

Outlookela

Member
Note: re-posted from accidentally in T1. I can't find other threads dealing with this specific corrosion issue.

Had my NVC 144 2016 from new 3.5 years and just discovered this issue of the dirt accumulation behind wheel wells (behind mud flaps to 2.5 inch depth - see photos). Known problem I see from a T1N post. I have a little bit of time/kilometres on my corrosion warrantee and emailed photos to my dealers attention, and they said they would open a file. I then followed up to ask what the next steps were, and a second time after that, receiving no responses. (this is covid times). I cleaned out the mud and sprayed the interior area that accumulates with "rust check" as temporary mitigation. See photos.

If 1/2 inch drainage holes and bees wax is the solution I feel they should rightly do that (even though I might prefer to do it myself. But that still leaves the corrosion and paint repair that I don't have the skills for.

My questions:

1. Given that my 4 year corrosion warrantee is current and this is a known condition, does anyone have suggestions on getting action from dealer, or am I possibly out of line here? Has anyone had a dealer fix this and what did they do?
2. Has anyone DIY fixed this problem and what did you do?

Thanks!
 

Attachments

Bobnoxious

GONE FISHING
Tough call.
I am inclined to avoid dealerships and still haven't done airbag recall because I don't want dipsticks working...fuggin-up on my vehicle. Dealer service departments are notoriously known as lemon factories.

Anyway, on other vehicle's, I have used Rustoleum.

Unfortunately, The foot well cavity under the plastic trim is another area of potential corrosion.

Good luck.
 

Kajtek1

2015 long/tall limo RV 2.1l
I would clean it better and investigate farther.
On 2nd picture looks like rust is coming from the weld under the paint.
Might be the rust washed out from the cavity above, but if you have rust coming from the welds, you better get paper trail on it.
 

Bobnoxious

GONE FISHING

Bobnoxious

GONE FISHING

erik.wahlstrom

Active member
Preventive maintenance.

I’ve considered filling this area with epoxy.
 

maz

UK Nottm 2008 315cdi4x4 van
To me it seems as if these things that are a problem with the sprinter [has been done specially to let the van corrode] they do not seem logically thought out.
It is like the germans said fuck it we don't give a shit anymore.
 

elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
To me it seems as if these things that are a problem with the sprinter [has been done specially to let the van corrode] they do not seem logically thought out.
It is like the germans said fuck it we don't give a shit anymore.
The German engineering mindset (as I perceive it) considers regular maintenance and periodic inspection to be fundamental elements of vehicle ownership. American consumers like the buy it/useit-abuseit/toss it approach. A friend of mine lusted after a new high end BMW "driving machine" but quickly grew tired of the regular/frequent shop visits with big maintenance bills; another loved his Porsche and thought nothing of $3,000 tune-ups once a year or so. I recently lost an engine in a BMW MINI after total loss of coolant due to a missing hose clamp following a repair; the German car specialist workshop owner was vexed at me because at the first (very poorly signaled) sign of trouble I didn't immediately pull off the road and have the vehicle flatbedded to a workshop for a complete inspection. (Poorly signaled = no temperature gauge, just a "continue your journey with caution" warning icon.)

My systems engineering background suggests that like quality, longevity should be designed into the system (vehicle) and not necessarily depend upon regular inspection and maintenance. You know, like space probes (hey Voyager! hey Spirit/Opportunity/Curiousity!). I think the Germans think inspection and maintenance are recreational activities, to be enjoyed the way Americans enjoy drinking beer and watching sports.
 

Top Bottom