ASR BAS and ESP warning lights . . .

G00R00

New member
So i've got two warning lights on . . . I look them up and they are the ASR/BAS and ESP systems. 2014 4cyl 7speed long and tall . . .

I'm 97% sure the reason for the warning lights is because i relocated everything under the driver's seat to under the dash on the passenger side! In doing so, I suspect that one or more of the fancy mystery computer boxes is sensitive to its mounting orientation (right now they are just dangling).

My question is this . . . does anyone know what box is what? Of course I failed to pay attention to the orientation when I removed them. Maybe help me idetify the one or ones responsible for this light and give me a refresher for how it is *normally* installed under the driver's seat?!

PS. I'm happy I moved everything . . . there is literally nothing left under my driver's seat and it makes me feel happy inside. I would however love to correct the orientation of the control box and reset the ASR/BAS and ESP systems . . .

Thanks!!
 

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Cheyenne

UK 2004 T1N 313CDi
OK Seen as nobody else has replied I'll throw in my opinion.

The ASR module will likely incorporate a 'YAW' sensor to detect any unwanted lateral movement or 'fishtailing' of the van. this would have been calibrated for the installed position of the module. You now have the module hanging by its wires so it is seeing a reading outside its calibrated range.

The only way I can see to remedy this is to return the module to its original position under the drivers seat. Even moving it forwards or rearwards in the van can cause unwanted behaviour.

And I've got to ask, why did you want to 'empty' the space under the drivers seat?

Keith.
 

elemental

Dis member
The ASR module will likely incorporate a 'YAW' sensor to detect any unwanted lateral movement or 'fishtailing' of the van. this would have been calibrated for the installed position of the module. You now have the module hanging by its wires so it is seeing a reading outside its calibrated range.
I've worked with 3-axis accelerometers in robotics, and can confirm that the orientation of the sensor is critical, and the position is probably important but not necessarily critical.

Orientation is critical because the sensor will have a built-in concept of the x, y, and z axes. The x and y axes are typically in the horizontal plane, with the z axis being vertical. An easy "at rest" sensor orientation to program from is with x and y perfectly level with respect to gravity, which puts all of the constant acceleration due to gravity into the z axis (i.e., z axis will read 1 gravity while x and y read 0 gravity each while the sensor is at rest). If, for example, such a sensor is first rotated 90 degrees about the y axis, then sampled while being held at rest, the x axis will read 1 gravity while z and y read 0. A 1 gravity force sideways (which is what the accelerometers measurement of 1 gravity along the x axis would indicate) with a corresponding 0 gravity force vertically (z axis) would be a faulty reading for a van as it isn't a flying saucer.

The position comes into play as the expected accelerations along the axes depend upon the position of the sensor with respect to the van's axis of rotation during normal turning motions of the van. I suspect the differences from position would be more subtle than with the orientation. It is possible that the module would pass its self-test, but might either perform sub-optimally in use or even experience behavior outside of its expected limits that causes it to register a fault (but only after driving).

The original poster already suspects that the orientation is a problem:
My question is this . . . does anyone know what box is what? Of course I failed to pay attention to the orientation when I removed them. Maybe help me idetify the one or ones responsible for this light and give me a refresher for how it is *normally* installed under the driver's seat?!
I assume the original poster wants to restore the orientation and try to make it work despite the difference in position, which isn't crazy but isn't guaranteed to be successful either.
 

G00R00

New member
I've worked with 3-axis accelerometers in robotics, and can confirm that the orientation of the sensor is critical, and the position is probably important but not necessarily critical.

Orientation is critical because the sensor will have a built-in concept of the x, y, and z axes. The x and y axes are typically in the horizontal plane, with the z axis being vertical. An easy "at rest" sensor orientation to program from is with x and y perfectly level with respect to gravity, which puts all of the constant acceleration due to gravity into the z axis (i.e., z axis will read 1 gravity while x and y read 0 gravity each while the sensor is at rest). If, for example, such a sensor is first rotated 90 degrees about the y axis, then sampled while being held at rest, the x axis will read 1 gravity while z and y read 0. A 1 gravity force sideways (which is what the accelerometers measurement of 1 gravity along the x axis would indicate) with a corresponding 0 gravity force vertically (z axis) would be a faulty reading for a van as it isn't a flying saucer.

The position comes into play as the expected accelerations along the axes depend upon the position of the sensor with respect to the van's axis of rotation during normal turning motions of the van. I suspect the differences from position would be more subtle than with the orientation. It is possible that the module would pass its self-test, but might either perform sub-optimally in use or even experience behavior outside of its expected limits that causes it to register a fault (but only after driving).

The original poster already suspects that the orientation is a problem:


I assume the original poster wants to restore the orientation and try to make it work despite the difference in position, which isn't crazy but isn't guaranteed to be successful either.
Yes! Anybody snap a photo under the driver's seat on a 2014?
 

G00R00

New member
Here are the part numbers in case anyone cares to share the installation schematics . . .

A 000 900 63 04
A 906 900 55 01
A 000 900 31 01
 

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