Need to install a serious recliner chair (zero gravity-type) in my 2005

denisec

New member
Greetings - I am just starting to assemble the interior of a 2005 Sprinter I am converting. I have a significant back issues and I need to install a recliner in the cargo area of the rig. I can't replace the passenger seat in the cab because that is where the cargo heater lives.

I left behind my favorite chair when I moved away from Pittsburgh. It was a good one, from Relax the Back, and I bought it for $250 on Craigslist. They usually retail for about $2000. If I could get out here (I'm in Portland OR now), how would I install it securely? The motor that drives it is really heavy.

If you think this is a bad idea or unrealistic, can you tell me why? And if so, where would you suggest I look for a used, quality recliner chair that would work for an RV installation? Thanks. I really don't want this to be a dealbreaker for living in the rig.
 

sprintah

VS 30 - 2020 Unity TB
If all else fails, try a La Fuma recliner. They have zero G positioning available. I also have back issues and find my La Fuma to be very comfortable and relaxing. It would not be a problem to get into your unit. And it folds up which may be an advantage also.
 

OldWest

T1N Westfalia
Poster Davydd designed some zero gravity twin beds in this thread. So you could do something similar. Dental chairs?

 

autostaretx

Erratic Member
Is your 2005 Sprinter a cargo van, or passenger?
The passenger van will have 3 or 6 floor anchor assemblies to attach the clip-in Mercedes bench seats.
The cargo van will have the under-floor structures to accept the anchors ...
BUT:
(a) the nuts to accept the anchor screws have a drop of "weldment" in them .... you can usually knock those out and clean up the nuts' threads with a metric tap.
(b) the fiberboard (and/or plywood) floor will have tiny drill holes marking out where you'd cut-to-remove the wood to provide access to the anchor positions.

Once you can reach the anchoring nuts (which are welded into the frame rails), it's simple to run high-stress bolts into them to secure your seating. They're designed to handle 150 pound seats carrying three 170 pound adults throughout the course of an accident. MB's seatbelts attach to the seat, and the seat (and floor anchor) structure handles all of the loads.

There are lots of old threads on adding seats to T1N (2005) cargo vans.

--dick
 

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