What size 80/20 for platform bed frame

asimba2

2016 4cyl High Roof 144
There's more to consider than just the deflection of the material. I stopped using 10-series because I wasn't happy with the strength of the small 1/4-20 fasteners. The 15 series accepts 5/16" bolts, which are 66% stronger. I love working with the 15-series.

-Ken
 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
There's more to consider than just the deflection of the material. I stopped using 10-series because I wasn't happy with the strength of the small 1/4-20 fasteners. The 15 series accepts 5/16" bolts, which are 66% stronger. I love working with the 15-series.

-Ken
3/16" angle and flat connectors work well with 15 series. I use 5/16" carriage bolts. No need for machined connectors. For angles at least one of the holes needs to be 1" from the angle apex so nuts do not hit.

 

Marksch

New member
So I built the bedframe with 10 series. 3 panels, 2 crosspieces for each, and 1/2 inch ply on top of that. Flexes and creaks a bit, but certainly strong enough. I needed to do a little work on 1/4 inch carriage bolts for them to work well, and even so, the square portion seems to extend just a shade beyond the 80/20. In retrospect, I think using 15 series would have been better...less flex, plug and play with 5/16 carriage bolts.

Next time.

and the two of us together weigh about 300lbs.
 
There's more to consider than just the deflection of the material. I stopped using 10-series because I wasn't happy with the strength of the small 1/4-20 fasteners. The 15 series accepts 5/16" bolts, which are 66% stronger. I love working with the 15-series.

-Ken
[/QUOTE

If using the carriage bolt connection method then I totally agree with Ken on this. However using the official 80/20 or T-slot connectors and bolts is a different story. Single connections with 10 series extrusions floating in the breeze can feel flimsy compared to 15 series, but once structures are all bolted together, the 10 series is very strong and sturdy. 1/4-20 carriage bolts break very easily; 1/4-20 T-Slot bolts on the other hand are all grade 8 and I have yet to break any of them.

I started my build using 15 series on Ken's advice, but I switched to 10 series for the majority of my build to save on weight once I realized the strength of a completed 10 series structure.
 

pbansen

Member
I think 15 series would be the way to go. Graphite Dave's drawings of connectors are indispensable and excellent - his method with 5/16" carriage bolts will save you a TON of money over buying 80/20 connectors. I don't know how many boxes of carriage bolts and nylock nuts I went through doing my build, but it was a lot.
 

pbansen

Member
Price out 1 5/8" Aluminum Strut from McMaster Carr. Stronger and cheaper than 80/20 even with shipping.
Shawn -

Not to be argumentative, but can you explain? I looked at your link for aluminum strut on McMaster-Carr and found the 1 1/2" strut that I think you are referencing for $55-57 for a 10' length (price varies for slotted or solid). It's .10" wall and has an open side, so it's a lot stronger in one direction than in another.

McMaster's price for silver-anodized 80/20 Series 15 is virtually identical: $57.82 for a 10' length: McMaster aluminum t-slot framing

I did my build with 80/20 and found that it offered excellent strength and the slots on four sides provided flexibility for joining pieces, attaching components to the wall/ceiling/floor of the Sprinter and that making my own connectors using Graphite Dave's great designs and 5/16" carriage bolts to be simple, accurate and cheap. I bought the 80/20 in 12' lengths from Grainger and picked it up at their location, so there was no cost for shipping. As much as I like McMaster-Carr, their shipping, while hardly exorbitant, is far from cheap.

Everyone is looking for a better and more cost-effective way to do their build, because we're all doing it on a budget, but I'm trying to understand how the aluminum strut is better or cheaper than 80/20.

Thanks,
Pete
 

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