DPF always goes up to 100 percent before starting regen

My 2019 brought up the message "Perform DPF Regen" as if I could choose this function manually. Checking the dash, it started at about 84% and came on every time I started the van. I drove the van for about an hour and the DFF reading went to about 98%. I suppose this will start at 100%. Does all this sound normal? Did everyone else get the request to perform a DPF regen?
 

Goran

Member
From reading threads in the VS30 area, my understanding is that the 2019+ vans have a DPF percentage and ReGen indicator as available information in the dashboard display (I don't know whether a highline display is required in order to to see this information). In my case I'm using a ScanGauge II on my 2017 model year NCV3; the SG II provides DPF percentage and ReGen On/Off as X-gauges (programmable monitors) using the OBD-II interface to the van.
Not mine. Mine just has the info on how full it is before it starts regen. Then when it hits 100 percent regen starts. And if you stop the car during regen it just continues when you starts going again. I did that one on accident. Didn't knew it s going through regen. Stopped for the night and in the morning when I left I checked and saw that it was at 67 and going down. So they're made now to basically be worry free unless you start having real problems, which if that happens to me I'm just taking out off and risk a ticket. I'm not going to worry about it.
 

Bobnoxious

GONE FISHING
My 2019 brought up the message "Perform DPF Regen" as if I could choose this function manually. Checking the dash, it started at about 84% and came on every time I started the van. I drove the van for about an hour and the DFF reading went to about 98%. I suppose this will start at 100%. Does all this sound normal? Did everyone else get the request to perform a DPF regen?
Manual DPF regenerations are not a "Default" cure all for DPF/sensor issues and therefore not to be performed "Willy-Nilly."

The key is preventive maintenanc/measures, for example, avoiding interrupting automatic DPF regenerations is an essential preventive maintenance measure to hopefully ensure long DPF service life.
 

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elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
[...]And if you stop the car during regen it just continues when you starts going again. I did that one on accident. Didn't knew it s going through regen. Stopped for the night and in the morning when I left I checked and saw that it was at 67 and going down. So they're made now to basically be worry free unless you start having real problems, which if that happens to me I'm just taking out off and risk a ticket. I'm not going to worry about it.
I believe that the pre-2019 models with the DPF handle interrupted regenerations in the same way - the regeneration will automatically restart next time the vehicle is operated. The main difference appears to be the provision of an indicator of DPF status on the MY 2019+ vehicles that isn't there on pre-2019 vehicles (which is where the ScanGauge II comes in). I haven't read about major changes to the regeneration process programming itself.

The recommendations on trying to avoid interrupting regenerations are based on some data showing that frequent regeneration interruptions aren't good. My understanding is that part of the problem is that the regeneration process itself is dumping extra fuel into the system, which can accumulate in the engine oil under ? conditions. Hence the recommendations (as Bobnoxious pointed out) on operating the vehicle at speed on a highway every once in a while if the vehicle is seeing lots of short trips.
 

Bobnoxious

GONE FISHING
I believe that the pre-2019 models with the DPF handle interrupted regenerations in the same way - the regeneration will automatically restart next time the vehicle is operated. The main difference appears to be the provision of an indicator of DPF status on the MY 2019+ vehicles that isn't there on pre-2019 vehicles (which is where the ScanGauge II comes in). I haven't read about major changes to the regeneration process programming itself.

The recommendations on trying to avoid interrupting regenerations are based on some data showing that frequent regeneration interruptions aren't good. My understanding is that part of the problem is that the regeneration process itself is dumping extra fuel into the system, which can accumulate in the engine oil under ? conditions. Hence the recommendations (as Bobnoxious pointed out) on operating the vehicle at speed on a highway every once in a while if the vehicle is seeing lots of short trips.

My experience with 2015, OM 651, continued DPF interruptions illuminated the CEL and flaged code P2459, "DPF interrupted three times." I Checked code on Mecerdes site and said continued DPF interruptions could result in a hard Limp Home Mode, I understand resettable only by dealership or similarly equipped independent and only after DPF regeneration issue resolved which, may be nothing other than simply the driving the vehicle continuously for 2 to 3 hours to extinguish the CEL. Mine did and has not returned in 2-plus years, 5,000 miles.
 

SMARTrides

New member
New and first time owner of a 2019 2500 170 extended roof sprinter. My DPF won't start regen until it gets all the way to 100 percent and then it starts. I don't know how to do a manual one. There reaky aren't any instructions on the 2019 how to do a forced regen. I tried everything. But the dpf goes up to 100 every time, the light doesn't come on, the car runs just fine. And once it hits 100 it starts the regen. From i red that's not good. I called the dealership and he sounded surprised by what I told him. Anyone know anything about this. Should I be worried and go check it out is it OK. I took pictures the last few t times it happened to show the dealership and I posted them here. From what I red on the internet if the dpf gets once like 85 it's done and you have to change it. Mine gets up to 100 almost daily because I do atleast 500 to 600 miles daily.
New and first time owner of a 2019 2500 170 extended roof sprinter. My DPF won't start regen until it gets all the way to 100 percent and then it starts. I don't know how to do a manual one. There reaky aren't any instructions on the 2019 how to do a forced regen. I tried everything. But the dpf goes up to 100 every time, the light doesn't come on, the car runs just fine. And once it hits 100 it starts the regen. From i red that's not good. I called the dealership and he sounded surprised by what I told him. Anyone know anything about this. Should I be worried and go check it out is it OK. I took pictures the last few t times it happened to show the dealership and I posted them here. From what I red on the internet if the dpf gets once like 85 it's done and you have to change it. Mine gets up to 100 almost daily because I do atleast 500 to 600 miles daily.
So that is normal. My 2019 does the exact same thing. Goes to 100% and kicks on with no lights or warning and I drive the vehicle till it goes to 0%
Here is a video I did on YouTube .
 

MTGJR1

Active member
2020 with every piece of electronics available. I'm disappointed that an indicator showing "regen in proces" is not available. Having to watch %load 20 or so miles before end of trip is a pain. Just finished first 1000 miles and have documented various stats to learn what "normal" is. 100% load at about 450 miles; 15 minutes to take % load to 0; regens faster at 45 mph than 60.
 

mikecol

Active member
It could be much worse: my 2019 Cargo it doesn't even have that menu choice.....the list ends with Engine Oil Level. Only "DEF" shows up which is the level of the tank.

Not sure why doesn't show in van...I don't have a PSM is that it?? not sure. Looks like my display same as in video shown....other than no Particle Filter choice.
 

SMARTrides

New member
2020 with every piece of electronics available. I'm disappointed that an indicator showing "regen in proces" is not available. Having to watch %load 20 or so miles before end of trip is a pain. Just finished first 1000 miles and have documented various stats to learn what "normal" is. 100% load at about 450 miles; 15 minutes to take % load to 0; regens faster at 45 mph than 60.
yes I’m also disappointed that it doesn’t have a regen light kick on, or a manual button to turn it on .
 

SMARTrides

New member
It could be much worse: my 2019 Cargo it doesn't even have that menu choice.....the list ends with Engine Oil Level. Only "DEF" shows up which is the level of the tank.

Not sure why doesn't show in van...I don't have a PSM is that it?? not sure. Looks like my display same as in video shown....other than no Particle Filter choice.
Hmm that’s interesting no dpf percentage ? Do you have steering wheel buttons on the left side of the steering wheel (on the steering wheel itself)?
 

mikecol

Active member
Hmm that’s interesting no dpf percentage ? Do you have steering wheel buttons on the left side of the steering wheel (on the steering wheel itself)?
Yes, same scroll setup. No last menu item...wish it had that. In the dark on regen, other than to notice heat and I guess tracking the miles.
 

MTGJR1

Active member
My first regen was brought to my attention because mpg decreased by about 5 for no apparent reason.
 

elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
Yes, same scroll setup. No last menu item...wish it had that. In the dark on regen, other than to notice heat and I guess tracking the miles.
If you get an OBD-II monitor that is customized for Sprinter then you can get the DPF% and Regen status readouts. A ScanGauge II works for my 2017 van even though my van did not come with these readouts as part of the optional high-line pixel display. Other readouts provide engine and exhaust temperatures at various monitoring points, instantaneous fuel consumption, electrical system voltage, etc. Being able to display multiple readouts simultaneously is useful, too; rotating through my Sprinter's single readout at a time is a pain.
 

Dima74

Independent & Self Reliant - From Chattanooga TN
It could be much worse: my 2019 Cargo it doesn't even have that menu choice.....the list ends with Engine Oil Level. Only "DEF" shows up which is the level of the tank.

Not sure why doesn't show in van...I don't have a PSM is that it?? not sure. Looks like my display same as in video shown....other than no Particle Filter choice.
The instrument cluster can be reprogrammed to show the dpf fill level. It is part of the variant coding.
 

SMARTrides

New member
The instrument cluster can be reprogrammed to show the dpf fill level. It is part of the variant coding.
Quick question , on 2019 model v6 diesel does the regen kick on due to the distance of miles or does it actually have a sensor which tells it when it’s full? Mine always kicks on about 500 miles average. Thanks
 

Dima74

Independent & Self Reliant - From Chattanooga TN
Quick question , on 2019 model v6 diesel does the regen kick on due to the distance of miles or does it actually have a sensor which tells it when it’s full? Mine always kicks on about 500 miles average. Thanks
It regenerates both ways, distance traveled and pressure difference, whichever comes first... It does have a sensor that reads the pressure difference between the pressure before the DPF and the pressure after the DPF. That is how the true soot level/value is calculated. The gauge on the instrument cluster might not be quite accurate in all the cases since it calculates the distance traveled also. The gauge might show 100% full due to traveled distance, but the true value calculated by the pressure difference can be at 6-7g/L (6-7 grams per litter) 75-80% full. 100% full based on the pressure difference = 8g/L. It would be good to monitor both, distance traveled and the pressure difference value at each regeneration...

Also, remember to keep your DEF tank full in order to prevent the triggering of the start countdown, as me and you discussed it a while back on your Youtube channel.
 
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elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
The gauge on the instrument cluster might not be quite accurate in all the cases since it calculates the distance traveled also.
As implied by Dima74, I think that the DPF% value displayed is an indication of how far along the ECU thinks the DPF is towards its next regeneration rather than a measurement of how "full" the DPF is of soot. It is possible for the value displayed to go down as well as up, and the rate at which it changes is not always linear with respect to distance traveled, so it is at least partly based on pressure. But since there is a "distance traveled" trigger for regens, the display probably includes distance so that people would not be seeing a regen happening with only 80% on the DPF% display. I would love to see a factory description of the actual measurement and display process.
 

SMARTrides

New member
It regenerates both ways, distance traveled and pressure difference, whichever comes first... It does have a sensor that reads the pressure difference between the pressure before the DPF and the pressure after the DPF. That is how the true soot level/value is calculated. The gauge on the instrument cluster might not be quite accurate in all the cases since it calculates the distance traveled also. The gauge might show 100% full due to traveled distance, but the true value calculated by the pressure difference can be at 6-7g/L (6-7 grams per litter) 75-80% full. 100% full based on the pressure difference = 8g/L. It would be good to monitor both, distance traveled and the pressure difference value at each regeneration...

Also, remember to keep your DEF tank full in order to prevent the triggering of the start countdown, as me and you discussed it a while back on your Youtube channel.
Ha! I was wondering if you were the guy who was the once messaging on the YouTube vid that i posted. Well thanks for all the info !
 

Old Man

2019 144 VS30 419
Manual DPF regenerations are not a "Default" cure all for DPF/sensor issues and therefore not to be performed "Willy-Nilly."

The key is preventive maintenanc/measures, for example, avoiding interrupting automatic DPF regenerations is an essential preventive maintenance measure to hopefully ensure long DPF service life.
Interesting figures quoted in that document. 300 km is a lot shorter distance than 480 miles. Where did that come from?
 

Dima74

Independent & Self Reliant - From Chattanooga TN
Interesting figures quoted in that document. 300 km is a lot shorter distance than 480 miles. Where did that come from?
It is a simple mistake that can be easily understood...

1 mile = 1.6km

300 miles x 1.6 = 480km

So it should have been stated "300 miles" and "480km"
 

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