DPF Filter Brackets - 2014 Sprinter 4-Cylinder / 7G Transmission

TML100

New member
Greetings everyone

This is to recap my learning in changing the DPF Brackets on my 2014 4-Cylinder Sprinter 2500 to the redesigned ones Mercedes has made available.

And to thank Sailquik for his backchannel responses to my E-mails...very helpful.

The original brackets are prone to breaking, and on failure cause the Diesel Particulate Filter flex-pipe connections to crack. Besides requiring replacement of the DPF Filter / Flex Pipe unit there is a potential to break the bell housing on the 7G-Tronic Transmission…which is my primary reason for doing the change. And I think why MBZ did the redesign.

Attached are images for the original and redesign brackets. The new brackets are obviously beefier and one includes a second connection point. Not sure if it's the upper or lower.

I learned during this process that the wiring and sensor damage others have mentioned with cracked flex pipe exhaust melting wiring and sensors is a 6-cylinder engine issue because the 4 cylinder design moves the susceptible equipment out of the way. I think the location of the DPF tank up front rather than in back, as on the 6-cylinder contributes to this. So by changing the brackets now, I avoid having to change the DPF Filter assembly until it breaks because the melting isn’t an issue on the 4-cylinder Sprinter.

I was told that eventually the DPF Flex Pipes would crack on their own due to wear and tear, at which point I would either hear the exhaust or smell diesel fuel, or both. But if the brackets are still good then the transmission bell housing will be unaffected.

Sailquik has had the new bracket break, so the new design doesn’t eliminate future breaks, but at 108,000 miles I went ahead thinking I’d be in a better position to avoid a bell housing break because I’ll hear or smell the cracked flex pipes first.
 

Attachments

JJolls

'14 170 4cyl Crew
Thanks for posting this... the brackets on my '14 4 cyl are still OK, but my thinking is like yours. I would like to replace them as preventative maintenance. Was the replacement a simple "unbolt" procedure, or was it more complicated than that. Also, I assume this was a MB Dealer purchase for you... what was the cost for the brackets?

Thanks for your contribution to the forum!
 

JJolls

'14 170 4cyl Crew
To answer my own question, I ordered a new DPF bracket from Europarts ($46.88 + shipping). It was a simple unbolt & replace procedure, but the area is somewhat tight and I needed a combination of different sized ratchet extensions to reach the bolts (Torx E12, E14). For access here, I needed to achieve a "Cinderella fit" with the extensions... not too long, not too short.

Also, I had to run out and purchase a new metric bolt to fit into a "stud hole" on the lower side of the transmission case, since the new bracket has double bolt holes. The new bracket fit right into place. Fairly easy job - maybe 1 hour messing around with it.

Also, I had recently noticed a high-pitched buzzing sound from that area when under heavy acceleration - that noise is now gone.

Hope this may help someone!
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
To answer my own question, I ordered a new DPF bracket from Europarts ($46.88 + shipping). It was a simple unbolt & replace procedure, but the area is somewhat tight and I needed a combination of different sized ratchet extensions to reach the bolts (Torx E12, E14). For access here, I needed to achieve a "Cinderella fit" with the extensions... not too long, not too short.

Also, I had to run out and purchase a new metric bolt to fit into a "stud hole" on the lower side of the transmission case, since the new bracket has double bolt holes. The new bracket fit right into place. Fairly easy job - maybe 1 hour messing around with it.

Also, I had recently noticed a high-pitched buzzing sound from that area when under heavy acceleration - that noise is now gone.

Hope this may help someone!
To minimize flex pipe stress, there exists a precise sequence of installation and torquing.
 

lrickley

New member
I decided to go ahead and replace the DPF bracket proactively, I was in for my Schedule B anyways so I thought why not. I had my local mechanic shop handle the repair, parts and labor came to $280. I explained to him what I needed done and he seemed intrigued, he called the local MB parts counter and inquired about the parts needed, to his surprise the MB parts guy told him, yes they have them in stock, this is a "common" parts request. I took that to mean that these failures are happening possibly at a higher rate than what we have been thinking and discussing on this thread.

I know its supposed to be an easy job, but given the potential for issues and the hight cost of the DPF assembly, I opted to have them handle it, I know that if they were to have broken something in the process, they would have covered the costs. I figured it was a cheap insurance policy. My van is a 2014 with the 4 cylinder, 115,000 miles in case anyone is curious. The old bracket looked to be in good shape, but with the horror stories shared, I just didn't think it was worth the gamble to let it go.
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
Was the mechanic Mercedes trained or have access to lastest manufacture's tech info such as WIS (work Information Service).

During bracket R&R, to reduce exhaust component preload, there exists a prescribed, specific sequence of installation and fastener torquing. See WIS for details.
 

ENMeyer

Member
How does one access the WIS? Is this the document?

LI49.10-N-060969 V3
 

lrickley

New member
Not sure on that, however, he did have access to some subscription system at the front counter, which when he entered in the MB part number it brought up the exact procedure, a multi page document with the step by step process, pictures, reasons for the repair, etc. I think it was a TSB of sorts, but it showed each step in the removal and installation process. Its been about 3000 miles since I had it done and I haven't noticed anything, no new noises (of course it wasn't making noises previously either). Bottom line, unless you do the work myself, do we ever really know if it was done correctly? I generally keep my expectations low, and in the case with this shop, I have been going there for several years for both my vehicles and have not yet been disappointed. But, your point is well taken, not going to the dealer is always a risk they may not be properly trained.

I did take my van to the dealer when the water pump went out though, it seemed with that repair in particular, there were too many gotcha's, even MB didn't have the procedure down correctly until some time had passed. So unless your local shop is on top of all these things, they would probably miss this as well. Sprinters in particular are not the most common, so many shops may not be familiar with working on them. I used to have a Hyundai Entourage van, they only were made for 2 years and would often get me into jams with getting them worked on as not many shops were familiar with them (even though they were 95% a Kia which were made for many years and were very popular).
 

LincolnLog

New member
I had a pre-buy done on my 2014 4-cylinder 7-speed at a local shop. They noted the broken DPF braket. I asked them if anything they had spotted needed immediate attention as I wanted to take it on a trip right away. No, it looks good they said. If I would have come to this site and searched all of the findings I could have saved myself many many dollars..... Not taking care of it and driving the van for 1000 miles has caused the DPF flex pipe to break and my bank account to cry! Luckily the trans housing was fine, but that damn DPF can is a $3000 part.....
 

lindenengineering

Well-known member
I had a pre-buy done on my 2014 4-cylinder 7-speed at a local shop. They noted the broken DPF braket. I asked them if anything they had spotted needed immediate attention as I wanted to take it on a trip right away. No, it looks good they said. If I would have come to this site and searched all of the findings I could have saved myself many many dollars..... Not taking care of it and driving the van for 1000 miles has caused the DPF flex pipe to break and my bank account to cry! Luckily the trans housing was fine, but that damn DPF can is a $3000 part.....
Yes ignore that bracket at your wallet's peril.
A few months back we had a customer in for A service and a cracked bracket was observed.
Being part of some push bike, dirt bike event he said there was no time to fix it & preferred to go pedaling.
1000 miles later he was back with a broken exhaust manifold and insitu flex joint on that exhaust system.
No alternative but a wallet flush to fix it.
Commiserations
Dennis
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
How does one access the WIS? Is this the document?

LI49.10-N-060969 V3
Man, I just stumbled upon this while researching in preparation for preforming the task.

Yes, the reference number you provided matches Mercedes Benz Commercial Vans Technical Topics Webcast dated March, 2017, page 21.

Have you located the document? I think its been posted?
 

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