TRANSMISSION SLIPPING

Bryanbogater

New member
I was driving home and turned into my neighborhood and the transmission slipped some but acted fine after I made the turn and I got home fine. About half hour later I left my house and I stopped at a stop sign and my van was acting like it was in neutral. I turned off my van and waited 1 minute and it got back into gear and I nursed it back home repeating this process a few times. The trans fluid was low so I added 2 quarts. I think I may have overfilled because I'm have similar issues now.

Would a oil change and filter change help? Any advice appreciated.

I got a p0715 and a p0730 code

Bryan
2006 2500 sprinter
 
Last edited:
Low transmission fluid level can destroy an automatic transmission rather quickly. Adding fluid won't fix that. Changing the oil and filter won't fix that.

I'd recommend taking it to a competent Sprinter technician, and have him diagnose the Cause of your Complaint.
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
Do not operate your vehicle until you check the transmission fluid with the proper dipstick.

And, by no means panic by running to a "mechanic" until you check the fluid. Low fluid doesn't always result in catastrophic transmission damage, and avoid planting that seed in the mind of a mechanic or you are in for a good wallet flushing.

Questions: when's last time you checked the fluid or a serviced the transmission?
 
Last edited:

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
Low transmission fluid level can destroy an automatic transmission rather quickly. Adding fluid won't fix that. Changing the oil and filter won't fix that.

I'd recommend taking it to a competent Sprinter technician, and have him diagnose the Cause of your Complaint.
Assuming the transmission is destroyed.
 

Midwestdrifter

Engineer In Residence
Get the correct dipstick, and check your level. There is a specific process, so take a look on the write ups for details. From there get a sprinter compatible scanner, and see what codes the tcm reports.
 

Bryanbogater

New member
The van has about 180,000 on it and I've had it about for 60,000. I've never did any kind of transmission maintenance on it. I do have the weird dipstick for it. I probably don't check it as often as I should since I've never really had any problems.
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
So it was due for transmission services at 20K, 40K, 60K, 80K, 100K, 120K, 140K, 160K, and 180K, but it may never have been serviced...
If you owned a Sprinter, you'd know that those are not regular duty transmission service intervals. :rolleyes:

:lol:
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
The van has about 180,000 on it and I've had it about for 60,000. I've never did any kind of transmission maintenance on it. I do have the weird dipstick for it. I probably don't check it as often as I should since I've never really had any problems.
I would certainly consider performing a complete transmission service with the correct fluid.
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
I just remembered a forum discussion related to servicing neglected transmissions. The experience being fresh fluid loosens debris accumulation causing further damage, and suggested an incremental or gradual fluid change. Dunno, maybe others will chime in.
 

Bobnoxious

Adeptus Trollarium
If you owned a Sprinter, you'd know that those are not regular duty transmission service intervals. :rolleyes:

:lol:

IMHO, TGT's service intervals more accurately represent real world service needs. 20,0000-mile OCI's, just as believable as a "Sealed for Life" transmission.
 

Bryanbogater

New member
I decided to change the fluid, filter, conductor plate, drained the torque converter and it is operating correctly so far. I just did this today so hopefully I fixed the problem.
 

Nautamaran

2004 140” HRC 2500 (Crewed)
I decided to change the fluid, filter, conductor plate, drained the torque converter and it is operating correctly so far. I just did this today so hopefully I fixed the problem.
My impression is that a 60,000 mile service interval is about right, sooner if driving heavy.

MB originally considered the fluid good for life (which, by definition, it would be! :tongue:) so if the old fluid was exceptionally dirty you may have just performed the first service, and should be prepared for some glitches in the near term. The new fluid may loosen debris, potentially clogging internal oil passages (kinda the ATF equivalent of a blood clot).

I’d take a look at the fluid in 10,000 miles or so and consider performing a fluid-only drain and fill at that time (the filter is sized for life, so there’s no need to drop the pan).

:2cents:

-dave
 

Top Bottom