2019 Sprinter Front Light Headliner Removal

cacaw

Active member
I just got a 2019 Passenger 144 and am wondering how much of the headliners and side panels I should remove to add insulation. I don't mind doing the easy ones but don't want to get involved in any big or complicated jobs.
 

Enginenumber

New member
Hi there guys,
this is my second post on the site, however have been reading posts for about a year or more on and off.
I have just insulated my headliner a few week ago.
I found you I did not have to remove the whole thing. I just let the top 2 or 3 clips go at the back , think I just popped the plastic clips right out was easiest. Then I let the grab handle screws or bolts go and coat hooks on the vertical pillar on the plastic cover. Was almost enough to flex it down enough to get insulation in.

I used 3M thinsulate , you can just poke it in with a stick or something , then I cut full width strips and placed a squirt of 3M spray adhesive hi strength, on the back edge just to stop it falling forward down into the head liner. I then cut a few offcuts for the sides, a dab of spray and poked them in as well.

That was pretty much all I did.

Hope that Helps
 

slamit

www.cacampervan.com
Thank you. Is the headliner removal procedure same as 906?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It is similar, you must remove the visors/tray, the air bag has two hooks on top, you will need to push the bag up a bit to get the two hooks to "unhook" just above the side screw holes; then drop the air bag and the air bag can be separated from the headliner. Then headliner can be removed. Make sure the front wires on the front light are disconnected as well. Its a good idea to disconnect the ground when doing this to eliminate any power to the air bag. To properly do the front you need to drop the headliner, use sound deadening material, then layer your insulation if you want to get maximum benefit. If your going to this much effort might as well do it right. The combination doing sound deadener and proper insulation is a big difference together. Each one adds a bit more. The sound deadening is improved in the Sprinter (if you order the sound package; especially in a crew trim) significantly for every day commercial use, but falls short for a camper or hot/cold camping. Dropping you headliner is also the time many other things should be done in your van; primarly all the electrical work as well as installing roof rack rails.
 

dynaco1

Member
Took Enginenumber's advice and did not drop the entire cab headliner. The new side curtain airbags made me nervous. I did remove the parcel shelves and visors.

Asked my son to pull down on the rear of the headliner, while I inserted 18" x 60" strips of Thinsulate. Removed the overhead convenience lamp module and added an extra layer there and added double-layers of Thinsulate on the sides to fill the larger radius gaps.

Did not reinstall those silly little clips, which prevent the visors from rotating towards the side windows.

Since then, have successfully installed a Vancillary shelf.
 

oldblue

New member
I have a 2019 crew with the headliner extending to the rear of the van. Is it necessary to start at the front, or is it possible to remove the rear sections without removing the section over the cab?
 

slamit

www.cacampervan.com
You can start in rear...if you need to only do those panels, but you are taking them out in reverse...ideally you start with the front. They overlap like the older ones...this is why so its a bit easier doing them in a certain sequence. If you are pulling your headliner out...insulate and sound deaden your front as well. MAKES A HUGE difference. If you are yanking out your headliner because you are not going to use it then not so much...but give me a PM I will buy your factory headliner from you. :) Maybe even help pull it out if you give me a good deal.
 

oldblue

New member
Sorry, for now I'll be keeping the rear headliner. Someday I'd like to put in a wood ceiling, but knowing how quick I am at these kinds of projects, that will happen sometime between a few years and never. Right now I'm just adding thinsulate and a little sound deadening mat. I do expect I'll need to remove the rear part of the head liner multiple times over the course of the build since I'm not able to leave it off for an extended period of time.

One last question - is the van driveable with the overhead console unplugged? Or, does one need the cab headliner in place to give the console someplace to live?
 

slamit

www.cacampervan.com
Sorry, for now I'll be keeping the rear headliner. Someday I'd like to put in a wood ceiling, but knowing how quick I am at these kinds of projects, that will happen sometime between a few years and never. Right now I'm just adding thinsulate and a little sound deadening mat. I do expect I'll need to remove the rear part of the head liner multiple times over the course of the build since I'm not able to leave it off for an extended period of time.

One last question - is the van driveable with the overhead console unplugged? Or, does one need the cab headliner in place to give the console someplace to live?
:laughing: I get it for sure...nothing wrong with the headliner and those wood ceilings are very time consuming and if not done correctly can make a ton of noise with all the flexing.

You will get a light check on your dash saying your lights don't work...however at least when I plugged the lights back in...it was gone after restart. Add more than a little sound deadening...you will be glad you did especially on that HUGE panel in the front and heck you have it down right? You will see on my current build thread how much I use ...my vans are better than most when it comes to how quite they are, type of materials, where those materials are placed, and amount of material I use does make a difference...up to a point of course. I have been in other vans I did not do that where insulated/sound deadend differently, in a few cased a huge difference especially when the wrong materials where used. (denim for example) Typical high roof van I use $1200 in materials and it takes me about 18 hours working very fast. - not including the floor. Figure up to double that time if you have to figure out how to take things apart and back together again.
 

Go4adVanture

New member
It is similar, you must remove the visors/tray, the air bag has two hooks on top, you will need to push the bag up a bit to get the two hooks to "unhook" just above the side screw holes; then drop the air bag and the air bag can be separated from the headliner. Then headliner can be removed. Make sure the front wires on the front light are disconnected as well. Its a good idea to disconnect the ground when doing this to eliminate any power to the air bag. To properly do the front you need to drop the headliner, use sound deadening material, then layer your insulation if you want to get maximum benefit. If your going to this much effort might as well do it right. The combination doing sound deadener and proper insulation is a big difference together. Each one adds a bit more. The sound deadening is improved in the Sprinter (if you order the sound package) significantly for every day commercial use, but falls short for a camper or hot/cold camping. Dropping you headliner is also the time many other things should be done in your van; primarly all the electrical work as well as installing roof rack rails.
I appreciate your help on this but still confused on the side airbags. I have every bolt removed & the top of both A & B Pillar covers pulled back. But the headliner still feels bolted at the sides right where airbags are. I can’t see in there to see what’s holding it but fearful of messing up the airbags.
 

oldblue

New member
To get the moldings above the doors off, push up forcefully and pull towards the inside of the van. Takes 30 seconds if you are confident and know what your are doing. Probably will never work if you aren't. When I took the headliner off, I instead peeled back the molding above the door inch by inch and slowly pulled the headliner out of it until it was all out. I was fearful of damaging the molding but it was fine.

You don't want to do anything stupid, but the airbags aren't exactly fragile. As long as you don't yank on them, I'm not sure how you would damage them. I was nervous, but ultimately had no problem. You will need new clips, most of them break as you pull the headliner out.

 

Top Bottom