How do you start your Sprinter?

how do you start your sprinter?

  • wait for dash lights to turn off before cranking

    Votes: 67 77.9%
  • do not wait for dash lights to turn off before cranking

    Votes: 19 22.1%

  • Total voters
    86

heavy351

New member
It’s foolish to crank the engine while glow plug light is on because the shared load of glow plug and cranking can reduce voltage down to the point that damage to components can occur. However, know that just because the glow plug light is out does not mean that the plugs are cooling off and are not still being actively heated. They are. The light goes out signifying they are hot enough to start. Personally I wait for them to go out and give an extra 5 count then start, unless it’s already warm from driving and then I just wait for light out.
Ive noticed the time the glow plug light stays on is longer when it is very cold out.. and on the same day it will stay lit for half as long restarting a warm engine.

I therefore believe the indicator on the dash is actually showing us when current flows to glowplug. During starting, didn't you ever notice the headlights stay off? All available current goes to the starter. My lights come back a few moments on after the motor is running. Seriously doubt starter is sharing the current of the glow plug..

Been cycling the plugs 3x before starting on frigid days for 150,000 miles now..

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Gabe Athouse

New member
Ive noticed the time the glow plug light stays on is longer when it is very cold out.. and on the same day it will stay lit for half as long restarting a warm engine.

I therefore believe the indicator on the dash is actually showing us when current flows to glowplug. During starting, didn't you ever notice the headlights stay off? All available current goes to the starter. My lights come back a few moments on after the motor is running. Seriously doubt starter is sharing the current of the glow plug..

Been cycling the plugs 3x before starting on frigid days for 150,000 miles now..

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Well, I guess that’s possible and only testing would confirm, but if the engine stops glowing while cranking I’m not sure that would be the smartest way to try and get ignition, I mean common sense tells me that the glow should continue into cranking, but I’ll say that common sense flies out the windows on MANY aspects of this Mercedes van! Someday I’ll meet the person who designed the idiotic door lock system.
I’m half tempted to use my DC clamp meter to see if I can map out how they really work.

For many years glow controllers have generally been so that the glow light turns off when its time to crank, but a PWM type current was still applied to the plugs. This would go on for an undetermined amount of time even after the engine was running on all Cyl. Personally I prefer an air heater type starting aid than glow plugs. They seem to work and last forever. My old cummins has/had one, but that engine doesn’t even need it or glow plugs and I threw it out! It just starts from cranking. But that legendary engine is only the stuff of dreams anymore.
 

Gabe Athouse

New member
"because the shared load of glow plug and cranking can reduce voltage down to the point that damage to components can occur." Citations required....

How do you know, or not, that the MB engineers haven't already accounted for and coded the additional time in the algorithm?


:popcorn:
You realize it’s called a “wait to start light” Don’t you? Or are you just stirring the pot? Hey do whatever you want. You can ignore all your lights! Lots of people do! I’m just glad that so many people can incorrectly start their sprinters without negative results. Two thumbs up.

Also, read post #16.
 
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lindenengineering

Well-known member
I tell you what!
I just turn the bloody key when the glow plug light has gone out! .(Wonders of the modern world ! !
By comparison check out the start pah lava of a Kreigsmarine engine of the 1940's in a U Boat.

I apprenticed for a while with an ex prisoner of war engine mechanic who prey'd on allied shipping in the Atlantic before surrendering to the Royal Navy after a fire fight.

As a 17 year old I loved to take the pi$$ out of him as boys do!
I can still hear him shouting "shut up you stupid boy" in broken English . :laughing:
Gone now but not forgotten, (Maat Eric Kerigsmarine mechanic.)
Dennis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLfa43_1WH8
 

CJPJ

2008 3500 170"ext. 3.0 V6 OM642.993
image.jpg
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
You realize it’s called a “wait to start light” Don’t you? Or are you just stirring the pot? Hey do whatever you want. You can ignore all your lights! Lots of people do! I’m just glad that so many people can incorrectly start their sprinters without negative results. Two thumbs up.
I see the issue....

Despite me presenting a single quote from you verbiage, I was actually asking two and separate questions. Let's ignore the second one for the moment, and I will ask the first one again...

You said "because the shared load of glow plug and cranking can reduce voltage down to the point that damage to components can occur."

I would like you to provide citations to back up claim.... (Hint: I already know that your claim is wrong).
 

Gabe Athouse

New member
I see the issue....

Despite me presenting a single quote from you verbiage, I was actually asking two and separate questions. Let's ignore the second one for the moment, and I will ask the first one again...

You said "because the shared load of glow plug and cranking can reduce voltage down to the point that damage to components can occur."

I would like you to provide citations to back up claim.... (Hint: I already know that your claim is wrong).
How about post 16 of this very thread? Okay how do YOU know I’m wrong? Have you tested the amp load on GP during starting? Or are you claiming dropped voltage isn’t dangerous for an engines electronics?
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
I guess that I don't really understand the debate.

... Or are you claiming dropped voltage isn’t dangerous for an engines electronics?
Steady state low(er) voltage which doesn't somehow result in spikes of high(er) voltages is generally not the concern. Jump starting from one vehicle to another can often result in voltage spikes.

Assuming that the chassis battery meets OEM specifications and is in good operating condition, the system design includes accommodating pre-start glow plug operation.

I start my diesel engine sprinters as Dennis described.

:2cents: vic
 

Gabe Athouse

New member
I guess that I don't really understand the debate.


Steady state low(er) voltage which doesn't somehow result in spikes of high(er) voltages is generally not the concern. Jump starting from one vehicle to another can often result in voltage spikes.

Assuming that the chassis battery meets OEM specifications and is in good operating condition, the system design includes accommodating pre-start glow plug operation.

I start my diesel engine sprinters as Dennis described.

:2cents: vic
I don’t either, Orion just likes to be a useless addition to any given thread.
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
How about post 16 of this very thread? Okay how do YOU know I’m wrong? Have you tested the amp load on GP during starting? Or are you claiming dropped voltage isn’t dangerous for an engines electronics?
You want me to look at someone's post who I've lost any or ll respect for and is on my Ignore user list?

Sigh, ok......

I looked.... epic fail, on your behalf, for quoting someones else's 'opinion' and especially his. :lol:

Tiny fail on mine, expecting you to know that when someone asks for citations it be from a source much higher up in tree of knowledge, experience, etc.... :idunno:

Since the ecu monitors voltages, it will take certain loads 'offline' as needed so that a catastrophe as you described won't occur.... :thumbup:






.
 
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OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
I guess that I don't really understand the debate.


Steady state low(er) voltage which doesn't somehow result in spikes of high(er) voltages is generally not the concern. Jump starting from one vehicle to another can often result in voltage spikes.

Assuming that the chassis battery meets OEM specifications and is in good operating condition, the system design includes accommodating pre-start glow plug operation.

I start my diesel engine sprinters as Dennis described.

:2cents: vic
I agree. The only time I have experience an electrical gremlin was immediately after I jump started someone.

That was the last I jumped someone, and have refused all requests since.
 

4wheeldog

2018 144" Tall Revel
First, I turn the key and wait for the coil light to extinguish, unless the engine is above 150F. Then I just start it like any other vehicle.
I had an odd experience last week while exploring Death Valley. We went up to have a look at the charcoal kilns in the Panamints. 26 miles from sea level to about 7000' elevation. Last 3 miles were nasty ice and snow, 4x4 engaged and entirely necessary. Engine temp got up to about 220 on the last climb.
I let it idle for a minute to make sure the turbo had a chance to cool with lubrication. Spent about 30 minutes exploring.
When it was time to go, I did what I normally do, and was rewarded with a long crank, no start. 3 more 10 second attempts with the same results.
I was actually doing a mental inventory of how much food we had at that point. We had at least 25 gallons of water.
Anyway, after letting it sit for a couple of minutes, I let it crank for another 10 seconds and it lit off at the end of the count. Normal idle immediately. Trip down was uneventful, and it hasn't done it again in the 1000 miles since.
My conjecture is that somehow, some parameter was off because of the 7000' climb between the last start and shutting down. Other theories would be welcome.
 
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Kajtek1

2015 long/tall limo RV 2.1l
.... Engine temp got up to about 220 on the last climb.
I let it idle for a minute to make sure the turbo had a chance to cool with lubrication. .... Other theories would be welcome.
When 1 minute is barely enough for turbo to cool down, engine at 220F had lot of hot spots, who could boil fuel in lines aka vapor lock. Common on older engines, but doesn't mean it can't happen on new one.
Death vales grades are deadly. Last summer I was driving my Ford F350 with 6000 lb camper on it. From 140F at the bottom. But the 440 HP Powerstroke is a beast and was pulling 50-60 mph heating only to 192F.
 
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4wheeldog

2018 144" Tall Revel
When 1 minute is barely enough for turbo to cool down, engine at 220F had lot of hot spots, who could boil fuel in lines aka vapor lock. Common on older engines, but doesn't mean it can't happen on new one.
Death vales grades are deadly. Last summer I was driving my Ford F350 with 6000 lb camper on it. From 140F at the bottom. But the 440 HP Powerstroke is a beast and was pulling 50-60 mph heating only to 192F.
I could believe vapor lock with gasoline, but have a difficult time imagining it with diesel.
But I did think about that.
I also found it interesting that while idling, in 45 degree air, the coolant temp went up, not down. So there was some heat hiding in that motor, somewhere.
 

Kajtek1

2015 long/tall limo RV 2.1l
Typical hot spots are in the heads around exhausts.
Imagine 2000F on 1 side of the port and 200F on coolant side. As long as coolant flows, that evens up to some degree, but once coolant stops, the 2000F energy has to go somewhere.
I know that engines in MB SUV are using electric coolant pumps to even up hot spots for few minutes after engine shut-down, so wonder if Sprinters use the idea as well, or not.
 

pacnwers

New member
Topic touches on related question to clarify as well. The shut down procedure. Again, older turbo diesels we would let idle for a minute or three before turning off. How about these newer MB engines. Is idle important and how long assume engine was fully warmed up and hot.
Thx



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
Topic touches on related question to clarify as well. The shut down procedure. Again, older turbo diesels we would let idle for a minute or three before turning off. How about these newer MB engines. Is idle important and how long assume engine was fully warmed up and hot.
Thx



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
My opinions.

The Sprinter turbo is rather small. The heated parts don't have great mass. I wouldn't pull right off a highway after running at 70 mph and shut down the engine. That said, if I'm coming down from 70 mph and into a rest stop I figure that the turbo has enough time to cool down.

I don't believe in idle to warm a cold engine. I do believe in starting, letting the oil pressure establish, and then driving without hard acceleration until the engine is a bit warm... warm, not hot.

I will submit that most sprinter owners in the world probably don't frequent forums and don't worry about the state/temperature of their turbo or engine at shutdown. The Garrett turbo still seems to have good service life.

:cheers: vic
 

Gabe Athouse

New member
You want me to look at someone's post who I've lost any or ll respect for and is on my Ignore user list?

Sigh, ok......

I looked.... epic fail, on your behalf, for quoting someones else's 'opinion' and especially his. :lol:

Tiny fail on mine, expecting you to know that when someone asks for citations it be from a source much higher up in tree of knowledge, experience, etc.... :idunno:

Since the ecu monitors voltages, it will take certain loads 'offline' as needed so that a catastrophe as you described won't occur.... :thumbup:






.
Well ORION, I just tested my claims about GP operation and gosh, guess what, I was right. I did this for other users and my own curiosity. I like to think that I contribute something now and then rather than just post trolling popcorn emojis and attempts at jokes.
My van at dead cold, clamp on amp meter on the positive feed cable to gp controller, turned van to on position, waited for WAIT TO START light to go out, started and let run. During glow the amps drawn were 125. Light went out amps fell to 30 and then kept falling to around 18-20 which it MAINTAINED FOR SEVERAL MINUTES, WHILE RUNNING, UNTIL FINALLY SHUTTING OFF ALL POWER TO GPCONTROLLER.

Now, if you want to argue that the van is smart enough to “take certain loads offline” well that’s the dumbest thing I’ve heard you say yet (maybe) because the ecu is the module that I contest can be damaged BY LOW VOLTAGE and if you don’t think 125a draw, plus cranking, on a single battery diesel system isn’t going to drag down the voltage, then, you’re an idiot. Which I don’t doubt. So does the ecu take the ecu offline during cranking to protect it? Can YOU prove that it functions this way? *hint, van cannot run without ecu*
By the way I video taped the meter during this test so don’t bother asking for proof
 
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CJPJ

2008 3500 170"ext. 3.0 V6 OM642.993
image.jpg

 

4wheeldog

2018 144" Tall Revel
Well ORION, I just tested my claims about GP operation and gosh, guess what, I was right. I did this for other users and my own curiosity. I like to think that I contribute something now and then rather than just post trolling popcorn emojis and attempts at jokes.
My van at dead cold, clamp on amp meter on the positive feed cable to gp controller, turned van to on position, waited for WAIT TO START light to go out, started and let run. During glow the amps drawn were 125. Light went out amps fell to 30 and then kept falling to around 18-20 which it MAINTAINED FOR SEVERAL MINUTES, WHILE RUNNING, UNTIL FINALLY SHUTTING OFF ALL POWER TO GPCONTROLLER.

Now, if you want to argue that the van is smart enough to “take certain loads offline” well that’s the dumbest thing I’ve heard you say yet (maybe) because the ecu is the module that I contest can be damaged BY LOW VOLTAGE and if you don’t think 125a draw, plus cranking, on a single battery diesel system isn’t going to drag down the voltage, then, you’re an idiot. Which I don’t doubt. So does the ecu take the ecu offline during cranking to protect it? Can YOU prove that it functions this way? *hint, van cannot run without ecu*
By the way I video taped the meter during this test so don’t bother asking for proof
125 AMPS? Really? That sounds like a lot. Watts would sound more likely.
Because 125 amps plus what the starter draws......It is a wonder that these things start at all, after two weeks.
But it does justify my either using a battery charger before starting, or jumping with the house battery, when it has been sitting and it is cold.
 

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