2019 models: 3.5 Ecoboost, 3.2 Powerstroke I5 or Mercedes 3.0 V6

Midwestdrifter

Engineer In Residence
Some people can break anything. Foolproof doesn't exist. The statistics show that cars built after the late 80s are much more reliable, with longer service lives.
 

Ed463

Member
2001 F150, tranny went at 70k. 2004 grand am, lemon law before 80k, 2007 saturn aura, transmission and head gasket before 100k. 2014 Sonata, transmission at 60k. 2002 Chevy express, engine went before 150k, 2018 buick encore, engine bearing? at under 40k.

Lucky most of these have been covered under warranty, but imo vehicles are built like **** nowadays.
Some people are just "unlucky":idunno::lol::lol:
Many years ago I worked with someone, the company accident book was his daily diary. Complete with blood stains:thinking:
 

Trick

New member
I was born and raised in the auto industry, and I have never heard of someone with an automotive history that bad.

The only common denominator I'm seeing in all that failure is you.
Bullsheit. I only drove a couple of those listed.

Let me guess this whole born and raised in the auto industry means the largest amount of your time is pre 2000 cars before they started making junk. I'm surrounded by the auto industry and I haven't heard of a worse history either, it doesn't mean it's not happening.
 
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asimba2

2016 4cyl High Roof 144
Promaster reliability makes any of these vans look good. Here's my colleague's repair list on a Promaster that they bought new and only has 51,000 miles:
Ignition recall
2 radiators
2 new cylinder heads (common Pentastar valvetrain problem)
rear door catch x2 (can't stop them from rattling)
10 (yes, 10) headlight bulbs
rear spring bushings, twice
oil filler neck replaced due to leak
coil pack
oil pressure sending unit
new transmission

That is totally unacceptable for a vehicle with only 51K.
 

4wheeldog

2018 144" Tall Revel
I was born and raised in the auto industry, and I have never heard of someone with an automotive history that bad.

The only common denominator I'm seeing in all that failure is you.
Yup. Some people can bend a crowbar in a sandbox.
Especially teenagers, in my experience.
 

Flagster

Member
Good analysis. You did leave out one other choice which is the new 3.5 liter non turbo gas 2020 Transit engine with the new 10 speed transmission. This engine does have the intake port injection with direct injection. That choice has the benefit of eliminating the diesel emission issues and has more performance than a diesel and lower scheduled maintenance costs. Negative is lower mpg if that is important to the user.
Does anyone know if this new 3.5l direct injection engine is being used in any current ford vehicles? Flex? Edge?
 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
Does anyone know if this new 3.5l direct injection engine is being used in any current ford vehicles? Flex? Edge?
Same engine detuned for van is used in multiple Ford products including the F-150. Same for this years transmission and rear end.

2019 F-150 has an improved Ecoboost that combines direct injection with port injection to help with carbon build up in intake. Unfortunately the 2020 Transit will still have the same direct injection Ecoboost engine as this years Transit. The 3.7 engine has been replaced in 2020 with a new design 3.5 non turbo engine that does have direct port and intake injection. That non turbo engine with the new 10 speed transmission may be a very good choice.
 

asimba2

2016 4cyl High Roof 144
2019 F-150 has an improved Ecoboost that combines direct injection with port injection to help with carbon build up in intake. Unfortunately the 2020 Transit will still have the same direct injection Ecoboost engine as this years Transit. The 3.7 engine has been replaced in 2020 with a new design 3.5 non turbo engine that does have direct port and intake injection. That non turbo engine with the new 10 speed transmission may be a very good choice.
Agreed. Engines with direct injection-only scare me more than the emissions system of a diesel. At the least the latter, while still complex, boils down to parts easily replaced under the van as part of the exhaust system. Valve deposits are nasty to deal with.

I would seriously have to consider a 3.5 dual injection AWD Transit if I were looking for a new van. I love my twin turbo 4 cyl diesel though, and wish Ford would offer their new twin turbo diesel 4 with AWD.
 

dttocs

New member
Promaster reliability makes any of these vans look good. Here's my colleague's repair list on a Promaster that they bought new and only has 51,000 miles:
Ignition recall
2 radiators
2 new cylinder heads (common Pentastar valvetrain problem)
rear door catch x2 (can't stop them from rattling)
10 (yes, 10) headlight bulbs
rear spring bushings, twice
oil filler neck replaced due to leak
coil pack
oil pressure sending unit
new transmission

That is totally unacceptable for a vehicle with only 51K.
How old is your colleague’s promaster? I’ve seen problems like that on 2014/15s but my late 2017 has been problem free other than a very slight coolant leak somewhere. (Topping it up every 6-9 months isn’t a big deal, and both my mechanic and I have looked...)
 

asimba2

2016 4cyl High Roof 144
How old is your colleague’s promaster?
A 2016.

FitRV's Promaster blew a headgasket back in December. They just got it back on the road with a new engine at just under 60K. Here's their blog post.
https://www.thefitrv.com/blog/lance-update-omg-its-happening/

They pointed out that their Promaster is a Winnebago, which extended the powertrain warranty from 3 yr/36k to 5 yrs/100k under a fleet deal. Good to know! If they had just a regular Promaster van and not a Winnebago, they would have had to pay for the new engine out of pocket.
 

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