DD/Digital Lab/Camper

sulkorp

Member
DD/Digital Lab/Camper

I've worked out of my Subaru Legacy Wagon for a bit too many years, and finally got into the vehicle which has the space for my everyday life.

I work within the motion picture industry, and have to carry around a heavy cart to many different locations on a regular basis. I will often have to work out of the van due to weather or location specific details. Living in Canada means that I will have to live with cold winters.

I did not do a custom order, and got one of the pre-built models that were at my local dealer. Luckily they had one with a few extra features which have made the van much nicer to drive.
Especially after working 15+ hours in a day having a nice safe van to come back to has been a huge change in life.

I know a lot of things can be added later, yet I chose to go the Crew route specifically for the windows, seats, and extra trim. I don't always have the time or funds to do alterations, so having a decent base has been very helpful. I did not want an empty cargo van, that I would be slowly building up, and also working&driving on a daily basis.

Specifics:
2019 144" Crew Van
V6 Diesel w/7speed
E1E Navigation
VF6 Black man-made leather
XM4 Acoustic Package
S00Z Comfort Package
F00Z Drivers Convenience Package
CV0Z Crew Van Comfort Package
FR8 Reversin Camera
E3M MBUX 7”

My end goals are:
To have space to load in and out my cart via the back gate.
Couch with pull out storage via rear
Battery Power system with shore charging
Solar
Vent
Wool Insulation
L-Track
Interior Paneling
Raised bed
Kitchen/water
Configuration with/without seats

I do have a generator which I use now for when I am operating out of the van.

Still figuring out a lot, and making baby steps forward.

My first steps are Sound Deadening and Insulation of any area lower area that has trim.
 

sulkorp

Member
It's still around 0c and below, yet we've begun working while we can on the van.

We settled on Noico 80mil for the sound deadening. The wheel arches were the first things tackled.
The double sided tape is a huge pain to take off, yet with time and heat most of it was gone.

Inside passenger rear lower panel is where we have started. The shadow covers a lot, yet most of the areas on the wallhave Noico.

Going to apply more Noico to the wheel well, I was prioritizing the double sided tape over Noico yet realized that is a silly thing to do.
 

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HarryN

Active member
Thanks for the photos.

So that little bit of sound deadener on a wheel well is enough to make a difference?
 

sulkorp

Member
It's enough to make some difference..

I realize I was prioritizing the double-sided tape, rather than the deadening.

I am going to re-do the gaps in that portion, and fill it in more.
 

sulkorp

Member
I have gotten the passenger side of the van insulated, and started deadening the drivers.

It has been pretty cold out, and I don't always have the time to let the interior heat up before working on it. I've also hopped onto a feature film which has most of my time completely taken up.

There is a photo here of the bare panels. I cannot say if they are different than the previous models.

It is clear that they didn't address the exterior trim issue, as the clips are not weather sealed.

I am going to go back into the door, as I worry some of the wool will stay off overtime and get into the door mechanism. I am thinking I'll need some tape to tape back those portions.

While I didn't have access to Havelock wool, working with this local insulation has been really easy and enjoyable.

Living in Ontario I got my wool from https://www.livingrooms.ws/

There was a bit of delay after payment, yet it all arrived in the end.
 

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sulkorp

Member
Back doors are also insulated up top.

Here is a photo of the bare panel with a flash, as I noticed the interior lighting was leaving some big shadows.

I know I am going to go back in once I am ready to wire, and have to move some of the insulation around. Really wanted to get a good base for cold and for times I have to work out of the van.
 

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Sprinty

New member
I like that you are breaking the Thinsulate Mold and going with wool. What were your main motivations? I too live in Ontario and was debating get quotes to ship the Havelock Wool
 

sulkorp

Member
I like that you are breaking the Thinsulate Mold and going with wool. What were your main motivations? I too live in Ontario and was debating get quotes to ship the Havelock Wool
I really would like to do my build supporting local companies whenever possible. I also felt that I could streamline some of the installation, as it seemed that most people did a multi-layer process when they did thinsulate.

In attempting to insulate in an eco-friendly way, there did not seem to be too many other options.

It was really a breeze to insulate, even though it isn't the same as Havelock, we found it really easy to manage and cut. This has a plastic grid going through the wool, which also makes it pretty easy to cut.
 

Sprinty

New member
How did you find fitting it into the closed ribs? Were you able to fish it through or just had to pack it in?

At 3.5 “ thick, do you have to compress it a fair bit? I believe the ribs/ cavities of the van are about 2” deep?
 
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sulkorp

Member
How did you find fitting it into the closed ribs? Were you able to fish it through or just had to pack it in?

At 3.5 “ thick, do you have to compress it a fair bit? I believe the ribs/ cavities of the van are about 2” deep?
No problems getting it into any parts of the van. I didn't have to fish it, it was pretty easy to get it in. It's really easy to cut out pieces and pull it through. The size of the wool will keep it in place. Super 77 for any bits otherwise.

If it was a small cavity it would have gotten squished into there.

I understand that an airgap is part of the insulation process. There is not always an airgap, in the closed portions. Although if wanted you could not use the full thickness of the 3.5. It is pretty simple to separate it, and if you wanted to make a thinner it wouldn't be hard.

3.5 was what I could find in my timeframe, and happy with it so far.
 

Notfamous

Member
Nice work so far!
What ramp are you using to load your cart? I have a filmtools Jr that I'm going to be strapping down in the back.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

sulkorp

Member
Nice work so far!
What ramp are you using to load your cart? I have a filmtools Jr that I'm going to be strapping down in the back.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
You'll have plenty of space for that cart : )

I currently load in-and-out a Deploy v3 cart, and have an INOVATIV Ranger cart inside for storage/workspace.

The INOVATIV was my old cart, yet needed to switch footprints as I couldn't get into a lot of locations by myself. It also took a lot to wire up everyday.

I have a ramp which is temporary, and it is a Prime Tri fold ramp. I didn't want to get a traditoinal ramp installed, as they take up a lot of space and block the rear windows.

This one I use 2/3 sections, and am able to walk up and push in my cart.

I first used it going straight into the floor of the van, yet noticed the ramp was damaging the gasket that goes around the rear doors. Now I place it on the bumper, and have a small hump to get over when in.

Ideally I'm going to get a Roll-A-Ramp, as they don't seem to take up a lot of space.

I store the ramp strapped together and inside for transport at the moment. It slides in along the drivers side.

Here are a couple of photos of the setup currently when I am working in the van.
 

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You mentioned that “I have a ramp which is temporary, and it is a Prime Tri fold ramp. I didn't want to get a traditoinal ramp installed, as they take up a lot of space and block the rear windows.

This one I use 2/3 sections, and am able to walk up and push in my cart.

I first used it going straight into the floor of the van, yet noticed the ramp was damaging the gasket that goes around the rear doors. Now I place it on the bumper, and have a small hump to get over when in.

Ideally I'm going to get a Roll-A-Ramp, as they don't seem to take up a lot of space.

I store the ramp strapped together and inside for transport at the moment.”

Would either of these be suitable for picking up partially disabled relatives who might be able to walk up the ramp but not be able to step up the high steps into a Sprinter? Would either be suitable for use with the sliding door instead of the back door?

Walk in His Peace,
David
 

sulkorp

Member
Would either of these be suitable for picking up partially disabled relatives who might be able to walk up the ramp but not be able to step up the high steps into a Sprinter? Would either be suitable for use with the sliding door instead of the back door?

Walk in His Peace,
David
Yes both would work for that method. I have not put the Prime ramp at the side, so cannot mention its mounting.

I would suggest the Roll A Ramp
https://www.rollaramp.com/

Van page
https://www.rollaramp.com/van-ramps/

It can either roll into itself, or be tightened and fold like a folding ramp.

The prime ramp is very simliar to a ladder, and is not solid all the way up.

Roll A Ramp is more of a solid ramp/step the whole way up. It can also be mounted via quick release pins if it is going in/out.

On their website they show a variety of uses for their ramps (ie houses, accessibility)
 

sulkorp

Member
Would either of these be suitable for picking up partially disabled relatives who might be able to walk up the ramp but not be able to step up the high steps into a Sprinter? Would either be suitable for use with the sliding door instead of the back door?

Walk in His Peace,
David
Here are some photos of the ramp setup I am doing.

I realize the roll a ramp can be quite pricey, so this may actually fit your needs. It is less than $200

I have no problem walking up and down it.

There are folding variations, although you would need 2 of them, and they don't lock together.
 

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sulkorp

Member
Lots of work, little time to do bigger jobs on the van.

Maxxair fan and adapters are in. Going to be putting a 4pin XLR connector on the wiring, and run it off of existing 12v motorcycle batteries that I have in pelican cases.

Wrapping out equipment after long hours and little light at times, has led me to a bunch of little scratches. Spent some time covering them up with paint. I will eventually be putting in paneling/material so not too concerned about the look.

The configuration of the carts/equipment is still changing, which is a learning process for where equipment ends up rubbing up against the body.

Both wheel arches are now fully deadmatted. I did take off the rubber protective coverings, to find out that my main equipment cart has rubbed up against the rubber and paint. sometimes denting the panel. Sanded those down to remove any surface rust, later primed. The current configuration is likely going to be the final one, as there isn't any damage happening on a recurring basis.
 

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