Dealers tells me 4,000 4x4s will be produced...

aksotar

New member
and a 4x conversion would affect the tranny, drivetrain, suspension, brakes and most likley they’d say engine and electrical system too... there already seems to be big differences in how different Dealers handle Sprinters as it is...
Oberainger’s conversions are still covered but I don’t know if they do 2019s yet and they only do the conversion in Germany..
 

grantwilson

FreedomVanGo
and a 4x conversion would affect the tranny, drivetrain, suspension, brakes and most likley they’d say engine and electrical system too... there already seems to be big differences in how different Dealers handle Sprinters as it is...
Oberainger’s conversions are still covered but I don’t know if they do 2019s yet and they only do the conversion in Germany..
Different strokes for sure.
He offers a 3 year warranty on the items as well.
 

Midwestdrifter

Engineer In Residence
All 4x4 systems cannot be all things to all people, so there are significant trade offs. Lots of lift, ride quality, etc. The factory system is built with the ESP/traction control in mind, so it will provide much better control at highway speeds when in AWD mode.

Mercedes has themselves in a bit of a pickle. They have been working with Oberaigner (OB) for decades, and they incorporated their design into the sprinter. The 4WD sprinter has never been crazy popular, so they were happy to let OB make the parts and let MB install them. Flash forward to recent years and the 4x4 is much more popular. OB can't or won't make the investment to increase their parts production. MB has lots of money invested in certifying the OB sourced 4x4 sprinters. I would bet the OB actually partly owns the parts designs, so MB can't just ask another supplier to make them. So now MB can choose to stick with OB at limited quantities, or they can switch suppliers, change designs, and pay the $$$$$$ to certify a new design in half a dozen major markets.

Toss in a recent pending design change (and the cert required) and its easy to see why there is so much delay with MB.
 

zither99

Member
All 4x4 systems cannot be all things to all people...
I would say Bang on. Perhaps Mercedes will develop their own version of the 4x4/AWD system in the near future like the salesman said, but it's so much speculating that it's not worth dreaming about at this point.


Off-topic here, but how does a quigley transit 4x4 sound compared to a sprinter? Is the Drivetrain quieter? I have seen a few around the city here lately.
 

grantwilson

FreedomVanGo
Quigley (last time I checked) was using F150 parts on the transit. If they are anything like the F150s I have driven recently, you can't even tell the 4x4 bits are there.
agreed.

Drove a transit a few weeks ago with a swap and it drives great. No clunks like ours
 

battleborn

Member
I guess the ride / driving experience in the Quigley Transit ford is superior to the sprinter- I had a discussion with a customer of mine who has extensive experience with both - also he did not want diesel.
 

Matt Foley

New member
It appears as if there quite a few just sitting around - Are they just too new or just too strange to the 4x4 market to be accepted yet?

Thanks Mike
Newberg Ford is the national hub for Quigley Transits as they come from Quigley.
 

David Kwong

New member
He's probably correct unless you can find one sitting on a dealer's lot somewhere. I ordered a Sprinter 4x4 in July 2017 and it wasn't delivered until August 2018. If you want one, be prepared for a long wait. The perk to ordering is you can get exactly what you want.
How much of a discount on the Sprinter 4x4 will dealer give you?
 

IdleUp

Member
Hey guys If there's an expert online, if you were to compare the ride suspension wise between a MB 3500 2wd to a 4x4 how would you consider the ride and handling difference. I've driven both from time to time and could not feel a big difference, but I don't have a lot of time in either.

Also since the 4x4 sits higher than a 2wd I was thinking it would feel tip'e on turns but I found the 4x4 solid with regard to turns. Could it be the 4x4 has stuffer suspension and or sway bar?

Thanks Mike
 

IdleUp

Member
The rumor of Winnabago buying most all the 4x4 in short and long WB is absolutely true. MB could care less about customers - they much rather build all these and ship them all to one location and get paid instantly.

I've seen 16 short and long Rebels and Era's on one lot.

Regards Mike
 

battleborn

Member
I think Winnebago got 100 4x4 units of the 2018 model year in one of their orders for the Revel - I’m not sure its fair to say MB doesn’t care about their customer - there is frustration caused by really high demand and no supply of the 4x4 model - i think the dealers are frustrated also as they have nothing to sell- my feeling is once the 4x4 units start coming off the new US production line the problem will eventually solve itself- I would guess it will take a few years - another unknow is what the demand for the diesel versus the gas engines will be- if they eventually offer a gas 4x4 model in the US i think that would be very popular - as a side note there are a LOT of new Revels sitting on lots and they are priced around $107K so I think its fair to say the even if Winnebago doubles their production of Revel when they get their first batch of the brand new 2019 chassis that would be all they could sell which i think is around 200 units - if MB makes around 4000 4x4 units that’s only a small percentage of the 4x4’s MB is estimated to produce for the US in 2019 model year (my figures are all guesses from what I have read here for conversation purposes only feel free to correct me).
 

Davydd

Active member
Wouldn't the biggest market for 4x4's be for RVs and toy hauler adventurists? I wouldn't see much need for fleet and city work vans. What am I not seeing?
 

aksotar

New member
Wouldn't the biggest market for 4x4's be for RVs and toy hauler adventurists? I wouldn't see much need for fleet and city work vans. What am I not seeing?
If you’re talking about van type RVs I can understand, but ones fully built out, esp 170s, slide outs, etc...I don’t see much use for them in 4wd... body flexing and weight would be rough on 4x4 RVs... unless 4WD means getting to a ski resort then I can see it’s purpose...
These are only a 35/65 4WD ratio..

What person in the Mtns or snow country wouldn’t prefer a 4x4 vs a 2WD fleet or work Van ??
 

IdleUp

Member
I have to admit - Winnabago Era 170 full size RV and the Rebel 144 rough and tough are pretty nice vans. One dealer order 32 in toatl and they are down to around 15 units, guys love them they sit up high go almost anywhere and hold top trade in value.

Whats' Not To Like?

REgards
 
And, the Fords are ugly. I'm quite interested in the Uni Van. Thanks for mentioning them. I'm going to email and find out more. I rather dislike the 2019. A 4wd solution on my 4cyl 2016 would be great.
 

PSDCamperVan

New member
I have a 2007 ML CDI 4matic DD that I originally bought to use as a donor for possible sprinter conversion so anxious to see what develops here with uni-van. Their website background looks impressive but hard to see what is going on between tires of that van. I think I see top of a pumpkin which suggests a straight axle in front. Knobby aggressive tread toyo m/t tires & lift look good under 2500 nvc3 hitop chassis!
 
So, this is appealing.

"Yes we are in taking orders. We have two openings for delivery the end of April.
UV 2550
• 5” suspension lift
• Dynatrac IFS front differential ( locker)
• Mercedes front wheel assemblies
• Mercedes front CV axles
• Atlas Two transfer case 3:1 ratio ( twin stick)
• front Coil overs
Other options available.
Price 29k
Kind regards,

Ken Kaye
Uni-van.com"
 

Attachments


Top Bottom