7 Speed Transmission (4 cylinder) Fluid Change

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
A quick search didn't show any Write-up.

Apparently the 2.143 liter OM-651 4 cylinder (inline) 2 stage turbocharged engine with the 7G-Tronic 7 speed transmission fluid change is a bit more complex than the V6 NAG1 5 speed. Typical drain and fill methods may not work DIY. Do your research before the project. Feel free to add tips, pictures, suggestions, or links here.

I'll kick it off with a compilation. Thanks goes to all contributors. :thumbup:

Simple job, right? I've been changing my own oil for 60 years, but because this was going it the first time for a Sprinter I thought I'd check here first. GLAD I DID!! I think I could have screwed it up.
Norm
Going to check before changing trans fluid too.


The transmission is significantly more complicated than changing oil. Definitely in the realm of diy. But your checklist is much longer. I have the 7 speed. The 5 [NAG1] may be easier.
Yes with a 7 speeder you need a special pump injection tool!
MB has joined the gang!
Just like ZF,& Fords & Chevs etc, plus scan tool..Mustn't forget a scan tool.
Only Toyota/Lexus still retains the ubiquitous level plug!
Just like 60 years ago really when as a 9 year old I checked the gearbox oil level in a 1936 Hillman Minx in my dad's shop. And that was with a 3/8th Whitworth spanner!:laughing:
All gone now!
Its called progress and DIY'rs are nowadays tolerated--just!

Dennis
This is the tool for this job.
Ensures you fill with the exact amount without wasting/spilling expensive fluid before checking final level with a scanner in most cases .

https://www.tooltopia.com/mityvac-m...MIvqKKzICD3gIVA77ACh1dlACkEAQYAiABEgKoQ_D_BwE

7 Speed Kit.jpg

Dennis
:cheers: vic
 

Bobnoxious

The Most Interesting Member

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sprinterPaul

Active member
I just did this recently. I spent a fair bit of time researching. The 7 speed isnt new and there are a couple write ups on it from other mb models.

I'll post up my findings and some notes soon. Some minor part differences are present over time. Like stand off tube. Some special tools help. Etc
 

sprinterPaul

Active member
I just did this recently. I spent a fair bit of time researching. The 7 speed isnt new and there are a couple write ups on it from other mb models.

I'll post up my findings and some notes soon. Some minor part differences are present over time. Like stand off tube. Some special tools help. Etc

https://mbworld.org/forums/c-class-...ed-automatic-transmission-service-thread.html

This write up is a very good starting point


I used the tool Bob posted to fill. Was simple and easy since you need to be able to disconnect quickly after filling. Once the transmission is at temperature.

There's also a special drift tool to knock the stand off pipe out. I used that as well since it was easy.

For the 4 cylinder you need a special tool to rotate the camshaft and expose the torque converter drain. I bought a new drain plug that came with red locktite on it.

Main things are having the van level and keeping the transmission pan clean when changing the filter. Magnesium bolts are stretch spec so have a good torque wrench on hand!





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Bobnoxious

The Most Interesting Member
Especially working on Mercedes. Research the steps prior to commencing any service or repairs, accumulate proper tools and no-hurry time. This would include all recent applicable manufacturer's updates. Follow them scrupulously. She's a finicky beast she is.

A former aerospace supervisor was always chanting" Plan your work, work your plan" and avid Gantt charting animal he was down to the smallest details all measured in 60-minute increments. I think I saw him once counting how many footsteps it was from my tool box to the restroom.
 

patentgeek

New member
And I thought changing the transmission fluid and filter on my old T1N was overly complicated. . . .

Reading through all the materials and procedures, this seems like something I could do myself.

However, since my 2014 144 Crew needed to visit the dealer for the driver/passenger airbag recall and new NOx sensors (courtesy the 70k California emissions warranty), I decided to have them do the 60k mile transmission service while it was there. A 15% off coupon saved me a few bucks.

I can justify the splurge given I can do the engine oil, oil filter, fuel filter, engine air filter, cabin air filter and differential myself.
 

Bobnoxious

The Most Interesting Member
And I thought changing the transmission fluid and filter on my old T1N was overly complicated. . . .

Reading through all the materials and procedures, this seems like something I could do myself.

However, since my 2014 144 Crew needed to visit the dealer for the driver/passenger airbag recall and new NOx sensors (courtesy the 70k California emissions warranty), I decided to have them do the 60k mile transmission service while it was there. A 15% off coupon saved me a few bucks.

I can justify the splurge given I can do the engine oil, oil filter, fuel filter, engine air filter, cabin air filter and differential myself.

Did they replace the NOx sensors under warranty?
 

Fun

New member
First post! - from a DIY-wanna-be who decided that in view of the complexity of changing the ATF we'd use the MB dealer service center for our

2014 2500 Sprinter Cargo van, Engine 651.955, 2.1L Diesel with 722.9 transmission, MB-M2CA170E/2014

- I called to confirm MB Service Center would change the ATF in the torque converter with an ATF change. Quoted a price of $530-545 + tax.
- Basic supplies for DIY cost $250 with shipping - https://europarts-sd.com/item.asp?PID=2320 plus some extra tools and IR thermometer. The process looked too complicated for a non-mechanic like me.
- I confirmed the torque converter would be flushed with the MB Service Representative when I left the van off for service. The bill was a tad higher than quoted as they add in an extra nonspecific charge of $45. I specifically asked why they only used 6 quarts for the service. But I did not argue at the time of payment because I thought I might be confused about the quantity required for a full flush. But, it looks, according to my notes, like it takes 9.5 quarts to do a full flush, not 6 qts.
- Called back and spoke with Service Rep who admitted he erroneously informed me about flushing the torque converter. He says this is how MB does it. My bill says "Perform Transmission Flush Per Manufacturers Specifications." He admitted that I'd been clear about the torque converter so he would speak with the shop manager. They have decided to allow me to bring the vehicle back to look for the torque converter drain plug. If it is there, they will do flush the TC. They do not believe my sprinter has the drain plug in the torque converter. Without a drain plug, he said they'd have to drop the whole torque converter which they do not do.
- I've looked for the bell housing cover and see a rounded black plug that looks smaller than the oval ones in the photos I've seen posted. The MB service dealer may be right that my particular transmission does not have a torque converter drain plug.
- Just curious if anyone can give their thoughts on the importance of flushing the whole system. Am I being overly concerned? This was our first ATF change at 50K. We are very compulsive about oil changes and have done the basic maintenance including fuel filters ourselves.
- Can MB service center flush the whole thing (torque converter too) or is it really not on their WIS? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Again, we have a 2014 2500 Sprinter Cargo van Engine 651.955, 2.1L Diesel with 722.9 7G Tronic transmission. Thanks!
 

sprinterPaul

Active member
First post! - from a DIY-wanna-be who decided that in view of the complexity of changing the ATF we'd use the MB dealer service center for our

2014 2500 Sprinter Cargo van, Engine 651.955, 2.1L Diesel with 722.9 transmission, MB-M2CA170E/2014

- I called to confirm MB Service Center would change the ATF in the torque converter with an ATF change. Quoted a price of $530-545 + tax.
- Basic supplies for DIY cost $250 with shipping - https://europarts-sd.com/item.asp?PID=2320 plus some extra tools and IR thermometer. The process looked too complicated for a non-mechanic like me.
- I confirmed the torque converter would be flushed with the MB Service Representative when I left the van off for service. The bill was a tad higher than quoted as they add in an extra nonspecific charge of $45. I specifically asked why they only used 6 quarts for the service. But I did not argue at the time of payment because I thought I might be confused about the quantity required for a full flush. But, it looks, according to my notes, like it takes 9.5 quarts to do a full flush, not 6 qts.
- Called back and spoke with Service Rep who admitted he erroneously informed me about flushing the torque converter. He says this is how MB does it. My bill says "Perform Transmission Flush Per Manufacturers Specifications." He admitted that I'd been clear about the torque converter so he would speak with the shop manager. They have decided to allow me to bring the vehicle back to look for the torque converter drain plug. If it is there, they will do flush the TC. They do not believe my sprinter has the drain plug in the torque converter. Without a drain plug, he said they'd have to drop the whole torque converter which they do not do.
- I've looked for the bell housing cover and see a rounded black plug that looks smaller than the oval ones in the photos I've seen posted. The MB service dealer may be right that my particular transmission does not have a torque converter drain plug.
- Just curious if anyone can give their thoughts on the importance of flushing the whole system. Am I being overly concerned? This was our first ATF change at 50K. We are very compulsive about oil changes and have done the basic maintenance including fuel filters ourselves.
- Can MB service center flush the whole thing (torque converter too) or is it really not on their WIS? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Again, we have a 2014 2500 Sprinter Cargo van Engine 651.955, 2.1L Diesel with 722.9 7G Tronic transmission. Thanks!


My 2016 had the torque converter drain bolt. And yes it takes way more than 6 qts.

Dennis has stated in the past that not all transmissions actually have it.


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Fun

New member
What I learned: ATF service on the 2014 Sprinter 7 speed, 722.9 transmission, 2.1 liter engine.
By shear luck we found the torque converter drain plug in the bell housing at home by just starting the engine a couple of times. Marked the position as I’d seen others do. See photos. Second trip to dealer and got complete ATF change. For a 2014 Sprinter 722.9 transmission - the filling capacity is 10 liters. An oil change is 9 liters. The filling capacity of transmission oil change with the torque converter is 9 liters and without the torque converter is 5.5 liters.
Borrowing from those before me (MANY THANKS!)… if I do the next ATF change this is what I would do:
Read: https://mbworld.org/forums/c-class-...ed-automatic-transmission-service-thread.html

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSTxTw5PxYk
And https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-72EN_pqUU

Research supplies: OEM TC Drain plug – 001-990-11-17
OEM Gasket 220-271-03-80
Transmission Drain Plug Seal 007603-012102
OEM Filter 222-277-20-00
6 pan bolts 004-990-35-12
9 Liters ATF/Gear oil 001-989-77-03-09
See what others had to say about kits:
https://www.blauparts.com/sprinter-atf-transmission-fluid-change-kit-7229-plus.html
https://europarts-sd.com/item.asp?PID=2320
Buy a good infrared thermometer and pump w/adaptor for the fluid and go for it!
 

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Kajtek1

2015 long/tall limo RV 2.1l
New to Sprinter, but I had 7G transmission on 3 sedans.
-all 7G I have seen do have converter plug (it was late 5G where plug was deleted)
-on sedans I had to bottom fill, but my Sprinter does have fill tube.
- 7G also has 7G + version, who has finer filter and require more frequent service.Still checking what I have on Sprinter.
-some of pan plugs are torqued very high and it is easy to strip the hex head. So when I had hard time to unscrew the plug, I just pulled the pan. Bigger splash, so you have to be ready for it, but this way you don't create additional mechanical problems.
 

tech49

2019 2500 144 4cyl GAS
I had the dealer do my 60k tran service. Im now at 120k, and need it again. The reason I elected to have the dealer do it at 60k, was partly intimidation of the task, and partly the cost (for once) seemed reasonable. When I added the costs for materials, it came to around $200 or a bit more I think. Dealer would do it for $400. I decided my inexperience and lack of tools was worth the extra $200.

BUT NOW, I think I can do it. I now have a dipstick tube in place, installed by the dealer previously. Is this as easy as draining, removing the pan bottom to replace the filter and gasket, then reinstalling the pan bottom with new bolts, then refilling at the dipstick with the SAME amount that I drained? I dont want to mess with the weird filling from the drain hole valve thing, which just sounds like a cluster**** and a recipe for automatically getting it wrong. I never have luck with things like that, anyway...
 

mcrox

New member
My 2015 Crew 4cyl 7 speed transmission is due for service. The dealer is hours away and the quote is $499 (and I've read that probably doesn't include draining the torque converter). A local transmission shop with great reviews and plenty of experience doing Sprinters gave me a much lower quote. My van does have the fill tube and they have the Mercedes tool that measures the level. But they didn't know anything about needing an infrared thermometer or other means of ensuring a specific temperature as I've read in other posts for the 7G-Tronic (Plus... right?) They said the measuring tool has cold and hot markings and they go by that. They do drop the pan, replace gasket and screws, drain torque converter if it's got a plug. Any thoughts?
 

sprinterPaul

Active member
I didnt have a dipstick on mine. The way to check fill is overfill. Get to temp checking with ir gun. Pull the fill line and let drain until flow changes. Basically at top of stand off pipe. Then plug!

But they sound like they know what they are doing. Hardest part is torquing those stetch spec bolts.
 

the dude

Member
I agree about snapping an over torqued bolt . As this has happened to me . Lucky the piece left backed out easily by hand . :cheers:
 

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