2003 glow plug module dissected

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
...

It's your vehicle and your decision to make, but there are simple and safe fixes to exhaust before choosing to solder in a non-fusable jumper.

-dave
Amen to that. Even though safety is a concern, my worry would more be causing the glow plug tip to expand and the possible consequences to the engine.

My 2004 has the external fuse DIY fix. In all the years since it was installed I have yet to gain any benefit from the external fuses.

My 2006 has an internal fuse DIY fix. In my opinion it is a bit easier as to implementation, and less cost to boot.

If a glow plug/fuse fails I will just need to pop the controller apart again.

This is the entire procedure.

A method for replacing individual glow plug fuses within the old style module.

My wife announced she was taking the 2006 white truck on a ladies shopping trip. It's basically ready to go, but when the ambient temperature drops below 35F or so the MIL aka CEL lights because there is a bad glow plug. I know that makes her nervous so I decided to fix it.

My original plan was to replace all five glow plugs and do the Surly Old Bill fuse modification as I did with my 2004.

Bill's excellent modification is here.

http://www.sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6935

Actually since doing the fuse modification on my 2004 none of my fuses have blown. I had 2 ea. spare glow plugs on hand. I also have an assortment of spare Sprinter fuses. I could wing it.

I pulled the GP module. The case was sealed with a rubber like caulking. I don't recall that seal on my 2004. Anyway, I cut the sealant loose with a sharp blade. After that I used a small screwdriver to pry the side covers away while placing toothpicks around to keep the gap open. The cover eventually popped off.

I found #4 glow plug fuse open.

I cleaned the burned ends to add short leads with fully insulated slide on connectors. I used a 25 amp fuse.

The soldered leads.

GlowPlugFuse (1).jpg

The 25 amp fuse tucks in nicely. I decided to use a 25 amp fuse because I had a bunch on hand. I used 20 amp on my SurlyOldBill external fuse mod. It's really just there for short protection, not traditional overload protection.

GlowPlugFuse01 (1).jpg


It looks to me like at least 2 more fuses could be squeezed in if needed. By using the newer smaller automotive fuses a full complement of 5 might even fit.

Be aware that there is a newer style MB updated design glow plug module that trips and resets so the various types of DIY fuse mods can be avoided by purchasing the new style module. The newer module is somewhere north of 100 bucks.

Some of my previous glow plug information is here.

http://www.sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?p=117395#post117395

The #4 glow plug removed from my 2006 hot engine like it was new. No problem at all.


:cheers: vic

Doktor A's Glow Plug Test procedure. :thumbup::thumbup:

That is not the easiest or most accurate test for open glow plugs.

See my old original post for making a simple fused glow plug test wire.

Connect to each glow plug pin socket in the engine harness connector at the glow module, one at a time. Simply brush the clip you would normally clamp to the battery + post, across the + post, for each glow plug pin test.

Pins are numbered on back side of plug with an accurate glow plug location.

A strong, harsh spark (if you're quick) or a blown fuse (if you're slow) indicates a failed shorted plug.

A gentle brush of sparks ,and no blow 20A fuse in 10 second, indicates a operating glow plug.

NO sparking indicates a open circuit glow plug.

Easy to see in strong daylight.

Doktor A
Added:
The 2006 main relay contacts looked great. No real signs of deterioration after 10 years 148,000 miles. That service time was in southern PA though.

Parts Info

I'm quite certain that the new style module is Dodge 68079372AB



Europarts SD stocks the new style T1N Glow Plug Module (As of 12/2016 I think the picture in the listing is the old style.)

http://europarts-sd.com/glowplugcontrolunit2002-2006.asp

Glow Plug Relay Module Dorman 904-304
http://www.dormanproducts.com/itemdetail.aspx?ProductID=74038&SEName=904-304

Misc. Parts Info (Verify before ordering.)

Glow Plug Relay Time Control Module For 2002-2006 Dodge / Freightliner Sprinter 2.7L Diesel Engine (Replaces OEM 68079372AA, 5170859AA, 5103568AA)

Replaces 68079372AA, 5170859AA, 5103568AA, 51 299 029, A 648 900 00 00 0 01

Mercedes Benz / Sprinter # 6489000000 / 0005453616

Other Part Number: 68079372AA 68079372AB V30710031 37105 10937105
Manufacturer Part Number: A 000 545 36 16 0005453616 0255452932 0285454032
Interchange Part Number: 0195456932 6489000000 5103568AA 5170859AA, 05103568AA 05170859AA 68079372AA
A 648 900 00 00, A 025 545 29 32 A 028 545 40 32
After inspecting the mini style vehicle fuses it is apparent that all 5 glow plug fuses can be repaired/replaced and will fit internally.

You may need the proper sized small slide-on connector to fit the fuse prongs. An option would be to just solder the wire/heat shrink to the fuse prong and avoid crimp connectors completely. That method will also work with the size fuse that I originally suggested.

Basic soldering talent is all that is needed for this internally mounted fix.

Five ea. Mini 32 volt 20 amp fuses.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/mini-20a-blade-fuse-5-pack?cm_vc=-10005


As an aside,
There has been a recall for some of the Harbor Freight (Harbor Fright??) fuse assortments.

http://www.harborfreight.com/recall-safety-information

(China. Setting fire to one vehicle at a time.)

vic
Click on the blue arrow icon within the quote box to access the original post/thread.

vic
 

Nautamaran

2004 140” SHC U.S. T1N
Internals of mine were also good as new (2004; 161,000 miles, Oregon, Alberta) except for the three blown links. I'm glad this repair is so straight forward as I hate throwing away perfectly good devices (and money!) for lack of a replacement part.

Vic's right: there's plenty of room in the enclosure to fit five mini-blade fuses. Solder an inch or two of 14 guage stranded wire to each blade, heat shrink them (I'm a fan of the double wall adhesive lined stuff), trim the extra wire to reach the failed link, tin the link and wire ends, solder in place and you're done before your coffee gets cold.

I considered simply doing this, but instead ran my leads out to an external fuse holder which I mounted to the fender above the battery. That was probably overkill, but as my wife will attest I often conclude that something worth doing is worth overdoing... :smirk: The external fuse holder WILL save me pulling out the headlight and cracking the module open again if I ever have another glowplug short to ground, but it could also be that this is a one time repair. I had four DTC codes (plugs 1,3,4, and one for an open circuit on module A), so the decision to replace all five plugs was obvious. While the pings and creaks made by 1&2 as I worked them free had me worried, plugs 3,4, and 5 came right out. When I opened my module it had three blown links, so the extra effort to bridge all five and run the leads to the fuse holder was minimal, if not strictly necessary.
However it was VERY satisfying to turn the key for the first cold start at -15'C/0'F and have the engine catch on the first crank and make NO smoke! Given the clattering and the black haze it produced before this repair I'm pretty sure my neighbours are happier too! :cheers:

-dave
 

mything2

Member
Amen to that. Even though safety is a concern, my worry would more be causing the glow plug tip to expand and the possible consequences to the engine.

My 2004 has the external fuse DIY fix. In all the years since it was installed I have yet to gain any benefit from the external fuses.

My 2006 has an internal fuse DIY fix. In my opinion it is a bit easier as to implementation, and less cost to boot.

If a glow plug/fuse fails I will just need to pop the controller apart again.

This is the entire procedure.





Click on the blue arrow icon within the quote box to access the original post/thread.

vic
Vic-

Very interesting input and much appreciated.

I'm about to replace all 5 GPs plus module on my 2006 Dodge Sprinter/2007 Airstream Interstate due getting repeated CELs with pending DTCs indicated glow plug involvement so I feel that-after 77K miles comprised mostly of mountain climbing trips to Alaska and Colorado-I don't want to mess with determining what has failed in the circuit even though I have a DAD and probably could pinpoint which GP is failing.

My question- the module currently being sold on Europarts says it's the newest-third revision-and most current version. They go on to say it's considerably smaller than the earlier unit and has automatic reset with no internal fuses to blow. Does this new feature (auto reset) obviate the need to rework internal fuses? Also.....any preference on glow plug manufacturer?

As always, I respect your :2cents:

Dan F
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
...

My question- the module currently being sold on Europarts says it's the newest-third revision-and most current version. They go on to say it's considerably smaller than the earlier unit and has automatic reset with no internal fuses to blow. Does this new feature (auto reset) obviate the need to rework internal fuses? Also.....any preference on glow plug manufacturer?

...
The new module wouldn't need any fuses.

I kept with my modified old module mostly because I'm cheap and like to mess with repairing things. The new design glow plug module that doesn't have the fusible links is a good upgrade for the money.

http://europarts-sd.com/mfg-subcat-item.asp?cID=101&scID=193

vic
 
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gord.tromac

New member
Am needing to replace my glow plug module but looking for some feedback on number of prongs there needs to be on the relay. When took mine off noted there's only 4 prongs on the relay and when took it apart there are only 4 relays (2 of which were blown). The new ones I see online (including from Europarts and others) seem to only have 3 prongs. How will I then connect a 5 pin harness to 3 prong connection on relay. And how will that work to feed 5 cylinders? Doesn't make any sense to me.
Anyone got any experience with this issue?
PS is 2006 3500
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
As I believe that I stated in another thread. My 2004 and 2006 OM647 OEM Glow Plug modules have 6 ea. fuse links of which only 5 each are used. The output connector has 6 ea. pins of which only 5 each are in use.

You are correct that for the NAS aka NAFTA 2.7L in-line 5 cylinder engine you need to have 5 ea. usable fuse link positions and 5 ea. usable output connector pins.

Did someone install the wrong module in your truck?

vic

Added:
Pictures of one of my modules are here.

Glow Plug Module Fix
https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=51543
 
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biggreen

Member
I love all the information and mod's here. I'm likely going to use on my 04 in Washington State at some point. HOWEVER, (see: snowbird) I have sprinters on Maui that show glow plug dtc's. Mostly I don't like seeing the check engine light on. Can I disable the module? Throw a stick to distract it?
 

anorth

New member
Thanks everyone for all the great information here!
I was getting error code P0674 (Cylinder 4 Glow Plug Circuit) on my 2004 Sprinter. I took the glow plug control module out and found that 2 of the internal fuses were blown. I just dissected a 30A fuse and soldered the 2 fuse element halves across the blown fuse gaps. Upon reassembly the trouble codes are now gone. 😁
 

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