Sprinter 310D Rear Differential Ratios??

RattyWagon

New member
Morning All. I'm in a bit a muddle. I have an S reg 310D MWB Sprinter with a high roof. This used to be a southwest highways workhorse and has now been lovingly converted into our climbing campervan of champs (which took ALOT longer than expected :rolleyes:)! All is great except one thing, motorway cruising is painfully loud at above 60mph (makes you want to want to wear headphones but even they don't drown out the seemingly very high revs!). My van doesn't have a rev counter so I can't say for sure what the revs are. Now the question I seek answering is whether there are varying rear differential ratios (I think this is what I mean) for sprinters and if so is it possible to replace the one I have (I suppose this is a 4.10 ratio - but I have crawled underneath and there is no sticker or indication as to what it really is) with one that is better suited to driving on motorways and if so what would a suitable ratio be??. I'm not looking to do 90mph! Just cruise at 70mph ish with less pain!

Other information is that my tyres are 225/70/15 Michelin Agilis. I also understand that it is not really possible/affordable to find larger wheels that will fit these older sprinters. I was thinking larger wheels/tyres might have the same effect, but if such wheels don't exist then I'm guessing changing the differential is my only option??

So any help/advice anyone may be able to give me on this would be really great and much appreciated!

Thanks in advance

Paul :confused:
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
Hi,

I had a 410D with a taller optional final drive ratio. Can't recall offhand what ratio it was exactly but I'll have a dig through the paperwork to see if it can be found.

It was fine if only lightly loaded but really it needed more power to turn the gearing. You may find - with your lighter shell - that it works pretty well.

I also seem to remember that alloys off some of the older euro barges possibly such as W123 etc. may fit the hubs.

Let me see what I can find out about it.

Simon
 
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maxextz

Rollin Rollin Rollin.....
hi rattywagon, ive read before that some "Michelin" tyres are very noisy, if its road noise then try sound proofing but if you think its revving to high then the drive final ratio could be the problem.
ps you have the right man on the case.:thumbup:
 

RattyWagon

New member
Hi Maxetz, thanks for your advice. :cheers:I think I'm pretty happy with the tyres, but that's interesting and they may also contribute. It is certainly the case that on the super smooth german autobahns for example the road noise is significantly reduced. However, the engine certainly seems to be revving too high. I can imagine the ratio that is in place at the minute is great for running around with really heavy loads (i.e. 1st gear is pretty much useless for me at the minute but I can imagine in a van filled with bricks for example you'd need it on a hill start.). I think I found a potential replacement rear differential on ebay but the cost seems high to me (http://myworld.ebay.co.uk/abbeygearbox/). It would be great to find out for sure if Mercedes did actually produce variations on this axle themselves and that way hopefully I could source one from somewhere. Does anyone know if the differentials from the later sprinters (i.e. 311 CDI etc.) would also fit the 310D?

Starting to think I may have to make do with what I have :thinking: but it would be great to at least reduce the motorway revs a little as I'm sure the engine is powerful enough to handle the change in ratio...

Thanks again

Paul..

:idunno:
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
Morning All. I'm in a bit a muddle. I have an S reg 310D MWB Sprinter with a high roof. This used to be a southwest highways workhorse and has now been lovingly converted into our climbing campervan of champs (which took ALOT longer than expected :rolleyes:)! All is great except one thing, motorway cruising is painfully loud at above 60mph (makes you want to want to wear headphones but even they don't drown out the seemingly very high revs!). My van doesn't have a rev counter so I can't say for sure what the revs are. Now the question I seek answering is whether there are varying rear differential ratios (I think this is what I mean) for sprinters and if so is it possible to replace the one I have (I suppose this is a 4.10 ratio - but I have crawled underneath and there is no sticker or indication as to what it really is) with one that is better suited to driving on motorways and if so what would a suitable ratio be??. I'm not looking to do 90mph! Just cruise at 70mph ish with less pain!

Other information is that my tyres are 225/70/15 Michelin Agilis. I also understand that it is not really possible/affordable to find larger wheels that will fit these older sprinters. I was thinking larger wheels/tyres might have the same effect, but if such wheels don't exist then I'm guessing changing the differential is my only option??

So any help/advice anyone may be able to give me on this would be really great and much appreciated!

Thanks in advance

Paul :confused:
Not an elegant method, but you could jack up the rear wheels and get under with the tranny in neutral (engine off) and count shaft revs (turn by hand) and wheel revs to determine the ratio. Then, you'd at least know what you have.
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
T1 standard ratios from the factory were:

210D - 3.45
310D - 4.11
410D - 4.11
212D - 3.45
312D - 4.11
412D - 4.11

The original sales brochure I have from 1993 just says "Optional rear axle ratios available on request" so not completely helpful but it does show at least that there are other possibilities. I can't find anything in writing about the ratio fitted to my 410D unfortunately.

I can't establish the PCD but I'm sure I can remember seeing T1s rocking around with MB passenger car alloys, so perhaps a couple of hours at a scrapyard could prove informative?
 
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maxextz

Rollin Rollin Rollin.....
kind off topic a shade, but my last t1n 313/158 had a different ratio to the 316/158 i have now, it used to drive me nuts:shifty: if you where on a roundabout 2nd gear was to low and 3rd to high and trying to drive at a 30mph limit was impossible in 4th, the van i have now its possible to drive in 4th as slow as 35 mph:clapping: big difference.

my ratio is 3.727.
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
I was thinking there's a good chance of a ~3.7 T1 ratio. The gap between 3.45 and 4.11 seems too wide for there not to be one.
 
3

312 diesel (closed)

Guest
Are the axles interchangeable for all years of T1N, I realise the twin wheel axles are different. Or are there variations between CDI and older versions?

My chassis cab is so low it'll spin its wheels in third on a wet roundabout, unless driven with great delicacy of boot. There again it doesn't really bother me as it must have done all of 100 miles in the last 3 months.
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
I don't know whether the different model gear sets are dimensionally compatible, but it could be established fairly easily. SteinarN was in contact with an Italian gear manufacturer, so there's a starting point for anyone interested enough to discover more.

Note that the above ratios are T1, and that with T1N an issue exists with final drive ratio coding in the ECU.
 

RattyWagon

New member
Hello again, thanks for all the replies! First things first, do I have a T1 or T1N? Next, as the sticker has disappeared from my diff I liked the idea of finding out what I have for sure. However, as I don't have the ability to jack up the rear of the van I decided to come up with another plan. This involved parking on a hill facing downwards. I marked the tyre with tape at one point (which I could see in the side mirror) I then taped a peice of string to the drive shaft (spinning metal bar between the engine and rear diff), then I rolled down the hill in neutral until I completed one revolution on the back wheels (shown by the tape going around once). Then I counted the number of revolutions the string made! Tadarr! Now this is where I am confused again, it seems that for one revolution of the rear wheel the drive shaft rotated 3 and 1/4 times. That seems completely wrong to me considering the high engine revs! I would have thought more revolutions would mean higer revs!:idunno:

Confused........

Now I'm wondering if i've lost my ability to count the turns of string! I'll double check.

Thanks to all again :thumbup:

Paul.
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
Hello again, thanks for all the replies! First things first, do I have a T1 or T1N? Next, as the sticker has disappeared from my diff I liked the idea of finding out what I have for sure. However, as I don't have the ability to jack up the rear of the van I decided to come up with another plan. This involved parking on a hill facing downwards. I marked the tyre with tape at one point (which I could see in the side mirror) I then taped a peice of string to the drive shaft (spinning metal bar between the engine and rear diff), then I rolled down the hill in neutral until I completed one revolution on the back wheels (shown by the tape going around once). Then I counted the number of revolutions the string made! Tadarr! Now this is where I am confused again, it seems that for one revolution of the rear wheel the drive shaft rotated 3 and 1/4 times. That seems completely wrong to me considering the high engine revs! I would have thought more revolutions would mean higer revs!:idunno:

Confused........

Now I'm wondering if i've lost my ability to count the turns of string! I'll double check.

Thanks to all again :thumbup:

Paul.
Good method! So, considering there might be some uncertainty here, looks like you might have the 3.45 ratio.
 

RattyWagon

New member
Yes I think you might be right! I reckon a little bit of error could creep in with such scientific method! :professor: However, I'm lost, I thought that the lower ratios i.e. 3.45 would effectively lower engine revs at a given speed? My thinking was that for one rotation of the wheel the drive shaft must only spin 3.45 times. Surely if the diff was a 4.10 then the engine would have to turn 4.10 times (i.e. higher revs) to get the same number of wheel revolutions? Or am I being thick and missing something obvious? :crazy:

:thinking::thinking::thinking:
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
I agree with your logic.
 

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