Click no start- some tips.

Cheyenne

UK 2004 T1N 313CDi
At 11.7 volts your battery is not up to the job! It should be nearer 12.7 volts. I suggest you replace the battery before doing anything else!

Keith.
 

Eric Experience

Well-known member
duby
Your battery is flat or your meter is faulty. You should have stopped at the battery if you followed the instructions. Jump start it and check your alternator. Eric.
 
Click no start- THE EASIEST TEST 1 OF 2 THINGS 1- Jumper cable from ground post from battery to the Metal bar on motor. ( note motor to frame ground is bad) 2- jumper cable from other car/van to pos. (+) post and sprinter not starting clamp to the motor TO GROUND THE STARTER. It took me 6 months to find. Stared when it want to and 1 click no start when it wanted too. A GROUND CABLE $15.00 CAN BE RUN TO THE MOTOR TO GROUND POST OF BATTERY.
Woo Hoo, I love this forum.. had a a click,no start issue, on my 2006 T1N with 56k on the clock, cleaned battery posts and it went away...also have a battery boost (winnebago feature) that usually overcomes any low engine battery by tying in the coach batteries.

All batteries are in good shape, but even with boost on , just click, click, click.. no start. Jumper start attempt from jumper box to battery, no start.

Ordered a $185 Bosch starter that arrives on Saturday.. but weather report says rain rain rain for next two days.

Tried hooking big heavy battery jumper cable to negative post on battery, then connected other end to big heavy metal on engine.

Starts.. and is now in my new pole barn so I can trouble shoot ground issues in the AM, out of the rain rain rain.

Thanks for the great tip tony in memphis.

Now where the heck is the motor to frame ground strap?

And if I want to add a ground strap to engine.. wonder where to attach
 

BlueNote

New member
Although the battery in our 2010 Roadtrek Agile tested well, it was the original Mercedes factory Varta battery from 2010. So I installed a new 900 CCA AGM battery and the problem seems to have gone away. Fingers crossed. There's a lot of really good information on this forum. Thanks to all who contribute.
 
Left side, low near front. $15.00 bucks. Based on the year of your vehicle I'd replace it.

View attachment 157293
Hello... I agree, thanks for taking the time to reply. Never worked on diesel's or MB but I am impressed with the fuel mileage, and my ownership of this rig has been relatively trouble free for the last 3+ years and 30K miles.

Spent some time and removed the engine to chassis ground strap this AM. Bolt on engine side was very tight, the small one on the chassis was not, almost loose.
Cleaned up all the contact points, with sandpaper and wire brush, and brake contact cleaner, looked carefully at the strap it looked fine so I just re-assembled.
I saw no evidence of any corrosion anywhere, my rig has never been in road salt and is never driven in snow or ice. Spends winter in sunny/warm FLA.

Started first crank so I am a happy camper, on my way to Ocracoke Island this weekend for some boon-docking and fishing. Will bring my jump starter and heavy jumper cables just in case.. but pretty confident problem was correctly diagnosed, and remedied.

Many thanks to all the experts here, ordered new OEM strap from ebay for $12.24 delivered. (Bobnoxious is my favorite poster here... hope you are calmed down about the recall and ready to collect your free money from MB soon.)
 
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Bobnoxious

For a few dollars more
Hello... I agree, thanks for taking the time to reply. Never worked on diesel's or MB but I am impressed with the fuel mileage, and my ownership of this rig has been relatively trouble free for the last 3+ years and 30K miles.

Spent some time and removed the engine to chassis ground strap this AM. Bolt on engine side was very tight, the small one on the chassis was not, almost loose.
Cleaned up all the contact points, with sandpaper and wire brush, and brake contact cleaner, looked carefully at the strap it looked fine so I just re-assembled.
I saw no evidence of any corrosion anywhere, my rig has never been in road salt and is never driven in snow or ice. Spends winter in sunny/warm FLA.

Started first crank so I am a happy camper, on my way to Ocracoke Island this weekend for some boon-docking and fishing. Will bring my jump starter and heavy jumper cables just in case.. but pretty confident problem was correctly diagnosed, and remedied.

Many thanks to all the experts here, ordered new OEM strap from ebay for $12.24 delivered. (Bobnoxious is my favorite poster here... hope you are calmed down about the recall and ready to collect your free money from MB soon.)
Right now I'm experiencing a dopamine rush as a result of your success.

Glad the ground strap cleaning worked out. I suspect a real moneymaker for many shops.
 

Duranutan

2018 Sprinter 170 4X4
I will add my experience to this conversation. I have a 2018 Sprinter. It would occasionally not start if I had just turned it off in the last 20 or so mins. Key position 1 fine, position 2 fine, all lights would come on, position 3 (starter engagement) I would get nothing. This was a low millage Sprinter, 24K miles rougly when this started happening.

This is a known issue and MB has a service bullitin for the problem. The park/neautral safety switch is located on the conductor plate inside the transmission and requires taking out the transmission vavlebody. Yes, craziest place ever to put the safty switch. Mine was fixed under warranty thankfully.
Jim
 

JoelAlbert

New member
So my tale of woe ..... looking for advice.

We have had 4 Random “No Starts” that seem to occur after a drive longer than 1 hour. Key turns, dash lights and icons all look good, but nothing happens when turned to start!

so far it’s always just gone away after 15m or so.

Brought it to dealer and they can’t find an answer. They were able to get a No Start during there test drives. No codes stored in regards to this problem.

its the Randomness that bugs me! Makes it hard to diagnose.

Any ideas?
 

synergy_58

2009 Navion and 2015 Crew
Had to use this “start up protocol” assesment a week ago, and WOOHOO it is a Geeeeerate flow chart! I found my starter to be the culprit, and it has been replaced! Thank you!
 
I will add my experience to this conversation. I have a 2018 Sprinter. It would occasionally not start if I had just turned it off in the last 20 or so mins. Key position 1 fine, position 2 fine, all lights would come on, position 3 (starter engagement) I would get nothing. This was a low millage Sprinter, 24K miles rougly when this started happening.

This is a known issue and MB has a service bullitin for the problem. The park/neautral safety switch is located on the conductor plate inside the transmission and requires taking out the transmission vavlebody. Yes, craziest place ever to put the safty switch. Mine was fixed under warranty thankfully.
Jim
I have the same problem, same model and year. Have tried 3 MB dealers. Just gave your info to the Bendigo Dealer. Would you happen to know the service bullitin number?
 
Hi all,
thought id share my experience with this exact problem. click no start, battery testing good, starter testing the same voltage as the battery, couldn’t even jump start the starter with a power probe. turned out to be a bad wire from the positive post on the battery going straight to the positive on the starter. definitely worth a troubleshoot before buying a whole new starter like i did. ran a 4 gauge wire from post to post and good as new. 7 dollar fix compared to a 200 dollar unnecessary purchase. hope this helps someone
 

Naildrivingman

New member
To solve the “Click no start” problem we need to divide into groups of problems.


The first group could be the Battery and Charging System.
The second group could be Security and Relays.
The third group could be the Starter and its Solenoid.


Initial Testing
To find out which group you have, test by turning on the interior light , turn the key if the light goes out it is the first group Battery and Charging system.

If the light stays on, next test by running a wire from the small terminal on the starter.
To do this you should make up a test lead. Get a 2m or 8 feet length of hook-up wire. Connect a small alligator clip to each end. Connect one clip to the small terminal on the starter and the other end to a multimeter lead. The other meter lead must go to earth (ground/negative). The seat mounting bolts are a good earth.

With the meter resting on the seat and switched to 20 volts DC, turn the key. If the meter reads 12 volts you have good security (SKREEM) and relays circuit so go to the third group. If you do not get the 12 volts the problem is in the second group, Security and Relays.

Background information.

Most electrical problems are caused by poor electrical connections. To understand why we need some basic science.

All metals except gold oxidize when exposed to moisture. Oxides are good insulators. MB uses good quality connectors with rubber seals but a little bit of moisture still gets in. The more important pins are silver plated. If a plug has provision for 6 wires but only has 5 fitted then there should be a rubber plug in the 6th hole to keep moisture out. Mixing metals for connections makes things worse. Cheap pins are tin pated steel, better ones are tin plated brass, the next up is plated silver. The best are gold plated.

If something is not working there is a good chance it is not properly connected to the loom. If you have a bad connection the ECU cannot see the device and chucks a code. If you then scan the vehicle you will get a message like XYZ is faulty when in fact it is not, but is just not connected.

Things like relays are hard to keep free of moisture so they are placed under seats or in closed boxes.

High current circuits have an added problem. A small amount of oxide causes some resistance this resistance causes the connection to get hot which greatly accelerates oxidation. This is very noticeable on battery terminals. When a heavy cable with a copper crimp is bolted to steel, because you have mixed metals you get oxide problems.

This is common when a negative battery cable is earthed. All is not lost if you keep moisture out with some form of moisture barrier like lanolin or silicone. If the oxidization occurs inside a crimp you can remove the oxide with something like soldering flux, the function of fluxes is to get in under oxide layers. If you clean a crimp with flux you must then wash and dry it quickly then soft solder it. Washing your engine with water is a sure way of generating many faults. Using a steam cleaner on any modern engine can lead to a very big repair job.

Battery and Charging System
If you have a problem in the first group you must decide if the battery is flat or there is a cable problem.

To test the battery connect a multimeter directly to the battery terminals it will normally show 12.6 volts. Get someone to turn the key. If the battery voltage drops to say 9 volts then your battery is not charged. If the voltage stays up around 12 then you have a cable problem.

To find the cable problem place one meter lead on the negative terminal and the other lead on a shiny metal part of the engine, turn the key again, if the meter reads less than 1 volt your battery earth is OK if it reads say 4 volts then your earth cable is the problem.

If your battery earth is good then test the positive terminal connection. To do this place one lead on the positive terminal directly and the other lead on the copper lug of the heavy wire. With key on, once again if it reads less than 1 volt you are Ok if it reads more your positive terminal is corroded.

By now you know if it’s the battery or the cables. If the battery is flat then we have to decide if it’s a faulty battery or a charging problem.

A common problem with Sprinters is the cable that connects the alternator to the battery. To test this it is best to get the engine running, so best to charge up the battery with a good 3 stage charger. If you only have an old style battery charger then it is prudent to disconnect the earth terminal on the battery to charge it by connecting directly to the terminals.

Once you have it charged and reconnected, start the engine. To decide if it is charging the battery use your multimeter to measure the battery voltage, it should be above 12.6 and slowly rising. A bit of fast idling should bring the voltage up to over 13volts. If this voltage is not rising over 12.6 [or less] then you may have a potential cable problem.

To test this connect your multimeter to the large terminal on the alternator. While the engine is running, with the voltmeter negative lead earthed your meter may show the same voltage as the battery. If it does you have an alternator problem. If the voltage at the large connection of the alternator is more like 14 volts then you have a cable problem.

If you have a cable problem then remove the earth lead on the battery first (for safety), then remove the cable. When you have the cable out, look for discolouration of the wire going into the crimps. If you find that, repair as in the discussion of corrosion above. Note there can be a heavy fuse in the cable under the engine, this is unlikely to be blown but it could be corroded.

At this stage we should consider the glow plugs. If when you turn the key the glow plugs come on it tells us that the ECU is happy for the engine to start but the start relay is not being energized. If we keep trying to find the fault turning the key many times then we risk flattening the battery because the glow plugs draw a lot of power. We are also shortening the life of the glow plugs by constantly heating them. If you have this situation it is best to unplug the glow plug controller, if you can find the glow plug fuse then pull it. If you are not able to find the fuse you can unplug the small 4 pin plug that connects the controller to the ECU.

Security and Relays
If the problem is in the second group then we have to work through the cct [aka circuit] to find the cause.

The starting circuit is complex for safety and security. The way it works is to first establish if you have a valid key. that verified, it checks to see if the transmission is in neutral, then the ECU checks if the basic parameters of the engine are safe to start. If all that is OK then the start relay is energized.

If you can find your start relay using the excellent information that is posted on this forum then you can feel the relay to find out if it is being energized.
Fuse Block #2 Fuse Map 2004
https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=24683

If it’s not or you are not sure, pull the relay out and look at the pins, if they are clean and shiny then we have to look at the voltages on the pins in the relay socket. Pin 30 should have 12 volts, pin 87 is the lead to the starter and will show 0 volts. The other pins 85 and 86 will have voltage across them when the ECU is trying to start. To verify this place your meter leads in 85and 86 turn the key. If you get nothing then the ECU is not telling the relay to start. If you get volts when the key is turned then the relay is being energized but is not sending the voltage to the starter, this could be a faulty relay or the wire to the starter is open.

Starter and its Solenoid

If the starter is faulty we need to pull it out and test it. Never ever short out the big terminals it is dangerous and proves nothing. The other thing to never ever do is hit the starter with a hammer. This practice started in the days of crude stator wiring, The modern starter has a permanent magnet stator that is made from very strong rare earth magnets these magnets are reliable but brittle. Eric.
It’s interesting that this post is the very first I read after becoming a member here. Even more so, because I am sitting in the Mercedes lobby waiting to pickup my 2020 sprinter I just purchased three days ago. I’m here because the starter failed two days ago. How weird is this?

looking forward to enjoying my Sprinter.
 

Puravida44

New member
So my tale of woe ..... looking for advice.

We have had 4 Random “No Starts” that seem to occur after a drive longer than 1 hour. Key turns, dash lights and icons all look good, but nothing happens when turned to start!

so far it’s always just gone away after 15m or so.

Brought it to dealer and they can’t find an answer. They were able to get a No Start during there test drives. No codes stored in regards to this problem.

its the Randomness that bugs me! Makes it hard to diagnose.

Any ideas?
I have exact same problem. 2017 sprinter 3500. MB says conductor plate but are reluctant to fix under warranty because they have never seen it happen. They want $1500. Did you get it fixed?
 

tonyinmemphis

New member
Click no start- THE EASIEST TEST 1 OF 2 THINGS 1- Jumper cable from ground post from battery to the Metal bar on motor. ( note motor to frame ground is bad) 2- jumper cable from other car/van to pos. (+) post and sprinter not starting clamp to the motor TO GROUND THE STARTER. It took me 6 months to find. Stared when it want to and 1 click no start when it wanted too. A GROUND CABLE $15.00 CAN BE RUN TO THE MOTOR TO GROUND POST OF BATTERY.
Hi, Could you please rephrase your statement? Especially your point #2? Maybe some photos for your work-around? Thanks, jkimpossible.
2 is jumping from other Vehicle or battery other vehicle you can place jumper cable normally to both post + & - / the van with one click Positive to positive post {note} the hound jumper cable has to be clamp to steal on motor. No pipes. If start normal you can drive it but you need add the ground cable. Due you will have same problem due to the old type Motor to frame grounding system. D26AEFDC-2B70-4433-973F-DDACD3492A30.png22981085-F7A7-4C25-A6D3-79E1D3A200C0.jpeg0B853117-E155-49C7-9892-3D745743B798.jpeg
 

Glennbw

New member
I have this issue with my 07. I get the the starter click like the battery's dead. I found out that if I just kept turning the ignition on then completely off then back on, the engine would eventually start. Typical is 2-3 times, the worst was 16 times. It eventually catches though. Anyone have this pattern? Newer battery.
I have same issue with 2008. It is a PIA. Still have not figured out how to fix. I am going to try the grounding above.
 

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