Bio diesel on my trip

Geriakt

2017 View 24J
Traveling through Illinois and I can not find non bio diesel in this state. The station's have #2 diesel, what is that? No one knows what B5, B10, or what B20 is. In St Louis the pumps are marked up to 5% bio mass can be in the diesel. How do you own or even drive through these states with a MB 3.0 Bluetec?
Tom
 

Geriakt

2017 View 24J
#2 is normal ULSD diesel--it is what you want.

By federal regulation, a pump with no bio label may contain no more than 5% bio. It is fine in your Sprinter.
The girl at the station said her #2 desiel was 15% Bio so no that would not be good. The buyer of fuel at shell said their #2 diesel was up to 10% Bio and stated I should not use it in a MB. This was 20 miles east of St Louis. 30 miles west of St Louis the pumps were clearly marked at QT not more than 5% Bio.
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
MB specifies no greater than B5 for continuous use, but intermittent use of up to B20 is OK. If you need a tank of B5-B20 to get across a state then it's no big deal.
 

Benagami

Member
B5 is 5% biodiesel, B20 is 20%. Your Sprinter will tolerate a tank or two occasionally.

If you have a choice between #1 and #2, always choose #2. #1 is gummy stuff your Sprinter can't handle. It's normally only sold in the winter as it contains chemicals to keep the diesel from turning into a gel in cold temps.

I would never assume that a pump that says #2, and isn't placarded, doesn't have biodiesel in it. I'd assume they're selling junky, gummy diesel. I usually avoid stations with pumps that just say #2. I had the check engine light come on after pumping at a station like that. The light didn't turn off until after I'd burned through a tank of brand name, 15 ppm, B0 (no biodiesel).
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
#1 is gummy stuff your Sprinter can't handle.
Diesel #1 is lower (not higher) in viscosity than diesel #2, and is sometimes mixed with #2 for winter use. But not to worry, basically you can safely use any diesel fuel sold at the pump in the US these days (while also keeping in mind the restricted use of >B5 for Mercedes vehicles.) Diesel #1 is essentially the same as kerosene or Jet A (although fuels dispensed as kerosene/Jet A are not really compatible for modern diesel vehicle use since they would probably have higher sulfur and lack the lubricity additives used in car/truck fuel.)


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Benagami

Member
Diesel #1 is lower (not higher) in viscosity than diesel #2, and is sometimes mixed with #2 for winter use. But not to worry, basically you can safely use any diesel fuel sold at the pump in the US these days (while also keeping in mind the restricted use of >B5 for Mercedes vehicles.) Diesel #1 is essentially the same as kerosene or Jet A (although fuels dispensed as kerosene/Jet A are not really compatible for modern diesel vehicle use since they would probably have higher sulfur and lack the lubricity additives used in car/truck fuel.)


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Maybe you can use that stuff in YOUR Sprinter, but I won't make that mistake again. And I don't think you should be spreading misinformation. Owners should read their manual. My manual is clear about what fuels NOT to use, including not using #1, and not using anything above B5.
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
It's not misinformation. The salient points are:

1. You can use B5-B20 on an intermittant basis, and certainly a fillup to get across a state will not be a problem.
2. You can use a #2/#1 winter blend (it's probably not necessary but if that's all there is then it won't hurt anything.) #1 diesel is not 'gummy', not even sure where that came from.
3. You should only use ULSD, but that's not a matter of concern since only ULSD is sold for road vehicles in the US these days.
4. The only thing you shouldn't use is greater than B20, but those pumps should be clearly marked.
 

showkey

Well-known member
This comes up about every 30 days.........MB updated stance on fuels as some regions only have bioblends available.

https://www.mbusa.com/vcm/MB/DigitalAssets/pdfmb/serviceandparts/biodiesel_Brochure5.pdf


Since many pumps are labeled 5-20% the Sprinter may have no clue the actual blend they are buying and the station owner may also no know what they are selling. But as the info above clearly gives the owner the info and service information.
 

Benagami

Member
The pump I saw selling #1 diesel was covered with a black, slimy buildup, especially where the pump nozzle was stored. It looked like black, greasy pudding and was about 1/2" thick, which is why I'm calling it "gummy." I pumped #2 into my sprinter and 300 miles later I got an emissions sensor failure (engine warning light). I filled up with Exxon 15 ppm non-biodiesel and drove another 300 miles. The light went off.

You put whatever you want in your Sprinter. I'm going to be vigilant, stick to what my manual says, and others should be encouraged to do the same.

BTW, from the brochure you posted:

"Due to production shortcomings it is possible for harmful by-products like metals or free fatty acids to contaminate biodiesel. Some distributors and retailers sell biodiesel blends that are not certified for the quality of their product and production processes. Use of biodiesel from non-name brand distributors/retailers increases the possible negative effects of the above mentioned quality deficiencies and can cause possible damage to the engine and fuel system."
 

showkey

Well-known member
The pump I saw selling #1 diesel was covered with a black, slimy buildup, especially where the pump nozzle was stored. It looked like black, greasy pudding and was about 1/2" thick, which is why I'm calling it "gummy." I pumped #2 into my sprinter and 300 miles later I got an emissions sensor failure (engine warning light). I filled up with Exxon 15 ppm non-biodiesel and drove another 300 miles. The light went off.

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Did you have the code retrieved to determine the exact problem or code ?
 

showkey

Well-known member
OK what was the Code and part or system ? Some all ready know the answer.......

For those that did not read the other posts:

"Default Re: Yellow Engine Diagnostic Lit Up
The code is P2202, NOx Sensor Circuit Low Input Bank 1. I put Exxon diesel in 50 miles ago. Should I ignore it?"


NOX sensors are known problem and have been updated several times both in software and parts. Linking that sensor to the fuel is a stretch, but it's possible, but also very very possible that code plus a DEF issue code will return in the future.
 
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rabbitdiesel1

New member
Biodiesel is higher in nitrogen oxide (nox) and I assume this could effect your Nox sensors. Stations selling B20 do not always have there pumps clearly marked. Mercedes tells us not to use bio for a reason.
 

rabbitdiesel1

New member
I'm sure that this is literally true, but I am curious as to how common a problem this really is. Is there a source of actual data on how likely one is to get >B5 from an unmarked pump?
I have no idea how common that would be. If the handle is really greasy you can bet it's bio. I just wish non bio would be made available for those of us who need it, There is really no benefit to running bio.
 

Benagami

Member
I have no idea how common that would be. If the handle is really greasy you can bet it's bio. I just wish non bio would be made available for those of us who need it, There is really no benefit to running bio.
The handle was greasy, but that's not where the buildup was. There was a thick gross buildup of fuel where the pump nozzle gets shoved into the pump when you're done. It was thick, shiny, and looked like chocolate pudding, but a much darker shade of black.
 

TangoGolf

New member
I avoid B-anything. Thanks for the fed no notice needed tip. My tip off for B-x fuel is it is usually 10 to 15 cents cheaper (WA) than "regular" diesel.

But with the info above I am going to cut the interval between fuel filter changes in half. I think the fed is screwing with diesel owners to please the "greenies"
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
My opinion.

As was mentioned previously the warnings, worries, and sometime horror stories/discussions regarding the use of bio-diesel blends surface here regularly. Commercially supplied bio-fuel blends will not destroy your Sprinter diesel engine. That is especially true for occasional use. If you are forced by where you live to always use commercially supplied bio-diesel that is over 5% then do some research. Your maintenance schedules may need to change to address *continuous* use of bio-fuel over 5%.

The operator manual is a Cliff Notes dumbed down version for Sprinter owners. At the least I recommend that concerned owners consult the Mercedes BeVo information. You will be enlightened, if you can wade through the format.

http://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolistenmain.php?language_id=1

https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/131.0_en.html

:cheers: vic
 
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Geriakt

2017 View 24J
Doing additional research purchasing diesel at a labeled USLD pump does not guarantee you are buying B0-B5. In the state of Illinois they have tax credit for B11 and above. You are buying B11-B15 in this state At every USLD pump with it labeled #2 diesel.
There should be a law nation wide to label every pump with the exact bio diesel level.
I will avoid driving through Illinois on all future trips.
 

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