Flushing the Brake Fluid / Brake Inspection

Altered Sprinter

Happy Little Vegemite
Bumping this thread.
We have a few new members who may think just changing brake pads over is the same as a forty year old Ford with disc pad replacement. Read and enjoy.
NOTE: ATE sensors belong on the outside pad not the in-side pad. [ATE Only]
Richard
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I just spoke with an Independent reputable MB Service shop near me, and the owner thought I was nuts to change Brake Fluid every 2 years. If I lived in a cold climate, it would be different, and that is where moisture can get into the brake lines I was told. But here in Atlanta where i live, he told me it was a waste, that the fluid is synthetic nowadays, and this dot4+ does not break down like older fluids did.


What are some other's thoughts on this? I also have an 06 MB eclass and same thing, only 20K miles on it, should I be changing this fluid, or is it unnecessary based on my climactic conditions?


Cheers
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
I will venture to say that I've never even flushed my fluid in my other vehicles until it was time to change the pads/drums, which comes out to around 50k miles each time or more. With 10k miles a year, this comes out to 5 years.

I think you'll be okay. The fluid will still absorb moisture and that will affect the brake lines more than the braking. I do it because the fluid is cheap (relatively to the cost of the van), I do my own service, and I have the tool to do it fast (no pumping pedal).

My vehicles are for the long term. If it wasn't, I wouldn't do it. :smilewink:

On a side note...I have to flush the DOT3 fluid out of my clutch at least every 2 years on my 13 year old vehicle, because it turns to black sludge (near the slave) and makes depressing the clutch hard. It's either due to the heat or the seals are going bad. :idunno:
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I will venture to say that I've never even flushed my fluid in my other vehicles until it was time to change the pads/drums, which comes out to around 50k miles each time or more. With 10k miles a year, this comes out to 5 years.

I think you'll be okay. The fluid will still absorb moisture and that will affect the brake lines more than the braking. I do it because the fluid is cheap (relatively to the cost of the van), I do my own service, and I have the tool to do it fast (no pumping pedal).

My vehicles are for the long term. If it wasn't, I wouldn't do it. :smilewink:

On a side note...I have to flush the DOT3 fluid out of my clutch at least every 2 years on my 13 year old vehicle, because it turns to black sludge (near the slave) and makes depressing the clutch hard. It's either due to the heat or the seals are going bad. :idunno:

Seek,


I too am in for the long haul, and plan on keeping her a long time. I just hate doing work not necessary, and a lot of service recommendations especially with MBUSA seems to be a lot more frequent that MB Global, pointing to MBUSA wanting to generate money via this lucrative concept called Service.

I purchased a manual bleeder, with a hand pump action, made by these folks http://www.amazon.com/Motive-Gear-0100-European-Bleeder/dp/B0002KM5L0/ref=pd_sbs_auto_3

It is different from your power system with the separate reservoir. Having not figured out how to do it yet with this system, and hearing this mechanic tell me what he did regarding climactic conditions, I am hiding form this service, but know I should do it. I also need to do it on my E Class, but that has SBC brakes and is dangerous to work on if not careful, add to this Dr. A stating this is not the best service to be a DIY due to not being able to purge the ABS using the DRB III computer.

But I am all for learning and doing it myself, I enjoy this, I just have to jump in the ditch and get through it. I am at 5 years, 63K miles on the Sprinter currently, so I would think it would not hurt me to try.....
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
Speed Bleeder

I just bought a set of these (www.speedbleeder.com) and installed them on a GMC pickup, and will now do it on the Sprinter.

The unit has a check valve, and no need for a second person!

Worked like a champ.


Has anyone else seen or heard of these by chance?
 

Gulf SV

Kevin Burns
Re: Speed Bleeder

I just bought a set of these (www.speedbleeder.com) and installed them on a GMC pickup, and will now do it on the Sprinter.

The unit has a check valve, and no need for a second person!

Worked like a champ.


Has anyone else seen or heard of these by chance?
I have them on my race and street motorbikes. They are fantastic. Racebike fluid is changed every two race weekends.

Considering I do need to rely on my binders for full on slowdowns from 140 to 30mph for some corners, I consider my testimony to be EXPERT. :professor: :rad: and :cheers:

BTW, brake fluid systems (that means clutch, too) will absorb H2O from condensation as the very hot calipers cool down. The condensation is what causes the eventual deterioration of the braking system. Speed Bleeders make this a no-hassle maintenance opportunity. Bleed them at least every two years, and you may never need to rebuild your calipers.
 
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kkanuck

LUV my T1N
Re: Speed Bleeder

I have them on my race and street motorbikes. They are fantastic. Racebike fluid is changed every two race weekends.

Considering I do need to rely on my binders for full on slowdowns from 140 to 30mph for some corners, I consider my testimony to be EXPERT. :professor: :rad: and :cheers:

BTW, brake fluid systems (that means clutch, too) will absorb H2O from condensation as the very hot calipers cool down. The condensation is what causes the eventual deterioration of the braking system. Speed Bleeders make this a no-hassle maintenance opportunity. Bleed them at least every two years, and you may never need to rebuild your calipers.

So if condensation is the culprit, then a garage kept vehicle has better fluid for longer periods I would think....
 

Gulf SV

Kevin Burns
Re: Speed Bleeder

So if condensation is the culprit, then a garage kept vehicle has better fluid for longer periods I would think....
I don't think so, but I'm usually in Vic's camp (I'm no expert. Wait, that contradicts me :thinking:). Brake components with heavy use will get extremely hot. The cooling cycle will cause some condensation. During regular use that condensation will cause the fluid to degrade, but we're talking a long time. That's why the recommended flush intervals are around two years, which is probably 30,000 miles. But, the more severe the operation, the shorter the interval should be. Like FedEx or UPS operations.

I went back and read some of the other posts, and now I wonder if the speed bleeders might be better to help get new fluid through all those pesky solenoids. These new systems are a real crapper for us DIY guys. :bash:
 

Altered Sprinter

Happy Little Vegemite
So if condensation is the culprit, then a garage kept vehicle has better fluid for longer periods I would think....
No 2 years 24 thousand miles is the life span of MB Brake fluids MB sheet 331.0 Dot 4 plus brake fuid.Part number A 00 989 08 07 13. ISO 4925 SAE J1703 FMVS116
Like oil the viscosity breaks down with oxidation and losses it maximum boiling point of 500F Boiling point /356F.Wet boiling point at least..
Water, air and contamination all contribute towards a "Degrading Brake Fluids" .Hence why it is recommended to flush brake components during a change over, to rid of water, and rust contamination inside of lines and reservoir etc.
A visual inspection can also show a cloud point discoloration as an indicator that the fluid is failing,and or a resistance check.
I'm almost 6 years in and never had brake issues ever.
Richard.
 
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kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I just bought a set for the Sprinter, and also for my e320 wagon, it was about $60 for eight of them with delivery.
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I just bought a set for the Sprinter, and also for my e320 wagon, it was about $60 for eight of them with delivery.
I too bought a set for an e320 sedan as well as the Sprinter too!


So I wonder if using these speed bleeders, one would still pressurize the brake reservoir with a Motive like this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0..._m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1PJJ11DVXDB1CSNGYBSX

And not worry with pressing the brake pedal old style, or would it be better to just use the pedal?
 

maxextz

Rollin Rollin Rollin.....
only seen this now great stuff thanks seek.:clapping:
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
If you're in a bind and need the fluid, it's okay for the short term and taking it easy. Otherwise you need the DOT 4 Plus which has the higher boiling point. So the answer is No on this fluid.


Another question , in Canada Canadiantire sell this brake fluid, so can I use it for Sprinter 2004?

 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
Any Mercedes or Dodge dealer in Canada would have the proper brake fluid for you!
 

Altered Sprinter

Happy Little Vegemite
Any Mercedes or Dodge dealer in Canada would have the proper brake fluid for you!
I'd agree with this but there are three of with Mercedes. under Sheet number 331.0
Part No MB A 000 989 08 07 13 is the current one for a Tin.:thumbup:
Older variants are MB 000 989 08 07 12/ 11/ 10 look for the last number for the current Brake fluid. Dot 3 Dot 4 Dot 4+Plus.....MB A 00 989 08 07 13 is backwards comparable.
MB bottles have on the back of the label, a Use by date. such as [ Expiry 01/12], make sure. 'It's not out of date'.


DSC01497(1) (Custom).JPG
Richard
 

1hen2ducks

2006 SHC & DAD owner
Re: Speed Bleeder

So if condensation is the culprit, then a garage kept vehicle has better fluid for longer periods I would think....
Except in the US deep south where humidity levels and rainfall are astronomical. EG; Atlanta

Sorry, kidding. snik snik
 

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