40k transmission service on my NCV3

Sprinter SS

Member
So this weekend I finished up my 40k maintenance on my 2012 sprinter non dually 144. The new van is a different animal when it comes to trans service for sure, little more congested under there. I managed to drop the pan without removing the crossmember or jacking the transmission. The fluid was dark brown and what is crazy is I dont tow and my heaviest load is two dirt bikes. I really use my van like a car, just like the cube space for my dirt bikes. Little tricky to get to torque converter drain plug and that's another reason I choose to do things like this maintenance. I doubt seriously a dealer is going to drain the torque converter. On my wifes GL the dealer told me draining the torque was not necessary! You only get 2.25 liters out of the pan, the rest is in the torque converter.

I drained 6.8 liters of fluid and pumped back in 7.1 liters. Used all new drain plugs, pan bolts and gaskets. I also used MB ATF 134 for the change. Angled ratchet with Allen head fit sweet.







 

bcislander

'07 Mercedes-badged Dodge
Did you suck the fluid out of the pan through the dip stick tube using your Motive Bleeder?
 

Sprinter SS

Member
No i used the Motive bleeder to pump fluid in rather than slowly using gravity and a funnel. I managed to remove the pan and replaced filter/cleaned magnet while in there.
 

671

New member
I can verify that the no-jack process of Sprinter SS worked on my 2008 2500 170 Freightliner.

There were a few moments when I had doubts. Things were a tight, for sure. It took a bit of manual dexterity and some imagination to pull it off. And when blind-seating the filter, I wished that I had x-ray vision.

There is very low clearance between the two front and the two rear pan screws and the crossmembers, so a right-angle ratcheting box wrench fitted with a T30 is very useful.

I put the front of the van on ramps such that the front wheels were a bit higher than the rear wheels, and the oil pan was allowed to drain overnight. The 5mm pan drain plug was not difficult, but the 4mm plug on the torque convertor was reluctant to move. Surprisingly, about 7.0 liters of ATF had drained from the oil pan! Given that 7 liters of ATF was drained, and the TC drain plug did not want to budge, I said screw it and just put in the new ATF. After all, 7 out of 8 is a .875 BA, and that's pretty good in my league.
 

Sprinter SS

Member
There were a few moments when I had doubts. Things were a tight, for sure. It took a bit of manual dexterity and some imagination to pull it off.

That sums it up! Feels good to have it changed.
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
I have a 2008 NCV3 3500 chassis under a Winnebago View. I was contemplating doing a transmission service at 40k miles (vehicle has 35k presently) but after acquiring a dipstick and checking the fluid level I found it to be very light pink, virtually like new fluid. Given this I'm wondering if I shouldn't move the change out to 45-50k? I want to service the vehicle adequately but over-servicing has its own negative implications and given that if the fluid looks like new (I know visual appearance doesn't tell everything, but...) there seems to be little point in changing within the next 5k miles. What do you guys think?
 

671

New member
Hey smiller, The ATF drained out was dark brown in color; in the drain pan, it was hard to tell of the fluid was ATF or engine oil, if that says anything.

Also: I wiped a significant amount of sludge from the bottom of the tranny pan, and the magnet was covered with black sludge.

I had just acquired the Sprinter, and wanted to do at least one change myself to establish a baseline, and see just how yucky the fluid was. Per maintenance records that came with the vehicle, the job had been done just about 35k miles ago.

I would say that when in doubt, change it out.
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
Normally I would agree but I guess I'm not really in that much doubt anymore given that the fluid looks virtually new.

In your case the reason it turned dark so quickly after the last change may simply be because they skipped draining the torque converter. It doesn't take much old fluid to contaminate the new. Hopefully now that you did the job right it will stay clear until the next change.
 

671

New member
because they skipped draining the torque converter
smiller, you are more than likely correct! There is no indication that the torque converter was ever drained.

After the job was done, I ran the van through all gears and drained a small sample from the pan; the fluid was clear and red. I am thinking that it is difficult to assess the cleanliness of the fluid from the small amount on the dipstick.

So now I have a baseline: clear red fluid, new filter and a clean pan and magnet.
 

Earp

New member
I know this is an old thread but figured I would try. Were is the best place to find the parts you listed in the OP post. Also are there any step by step guides to replacing the ATF fluid on these NCV3 models?
 

Top Bottom