Koni Shock Install

Tukala

Repair / Service
Hi alm you guys, and sorry for delayed answer.

In SV-Shocks, they really know what they're dealing with.
Doing suspension-system from trucks to Vans.
And shocks for Sprinters can be found in stock.

If any of you are interested, I'll be glad to help you out & ask / Check availability of shocks.

(sorry my English, hope you got my point Here)
:thinking:
 

marshroger@hotmail.com

2006,2500,118, Passenger
I have been looking for shocks for my 10 year old RV for some time. Kept hoping Bilstein would come out with HD shocks for the 2005. I had a bad experience with the Koni's. SV sounds like a good manufacturer as they know how to stabilize a truck or a train, surely they can do the same for a van.

Has anyone else purchased these? Who sells them? Anyone for a group buy?

-Randy
The SV's sound interesting to me as well. I haven't bought anything yet so I would be in on a group buy. I'm also trying to find a source here in Western Canada.
 

Zundfolge

1-2-4-5-3
Bringing this back. Just installed new Koni's set to max rebound on my '06 2500.

Have a constant load of about 200-300 lbs., and my initial impression up my driveway and back is that maybe full rebound is not ideal, and maybe I should have dialed it back a couple of notches? PITA to redo the fronts, but I may leave them for a few days and adjust to see what kind of a difference it makes.

I know that some have been happy with full rebound from the get go, but has anyone done adjusting to find a good sweet spot beyond that? My old ones were worn out and leaking, esp. the fronts, so this is an improvement, but I still sway back and forth quite a bit over the bumps on my dirt rd...
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
I haven't touched mine, except going to new tires and the dynamics did change a bit. I have gotten use to it.

What kind of tires do you have and do you think you'll get use to the stiffness? You could soften the rears and see how that changes the overall. Otherwise, you're right about the fronts being a PITA.
 

Zundfolge

1-2-4-5-3
I haven't touched mine, except going to new tires and the dynamics did change a bit. I have gotten use to it.

What kind of tires do you have and do you think you'll get use to the stiffness? You could soften the rears and see how that changes the overall. Otherwise, you're right about the fronts being a PITA.
I'm due for tires soon. Have Cooper Discoverer AT/3's and I will very likely get another pair soon, love 'em.

Think I might try the rears, and I'll play with the fronts next week, just so I can have a comparison.

You say you've gotten used to it, you mean in a good way? Do you ever wish it was softer?

P.S. What kind of tires you using?
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
You say you've gotten used to it, you mean in a good way? Do you ever wish it was softer?

P.S. What kind of tires you using?
Yes in a good way. I got rid of the rocking side-to-side going over speed bumps and driveways. To me it was a plus and a deterrent on changing the settings on my fronts.

ATX originally to AT/2's. It went from firm to squishy. I have gotten use to the squishy-ness or maybe an increase in comfort. It's been awhile.

https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17466
 

edj

New member
I installed front Koni's today and great thanks to Sikwan for his clear write-up. Great tip to use the 8mm Allen wrench to depress the shock and adjust the rebound. I was struggling to do this, but it was really easy once I used the Allen wrench - makes all the difference in leverage.

However, my install turned out to be a long saga, because when I went to remove the driver side wheel it wouldn't come off. This being first time removing wheel on my Sprinter I thought maybe there is something else I have to release. Fooled around for awhile and then after removing the little hub cover it dawned on me that the wheel was rusted on. Tried PB Blaster and anything else I could think of to no avail (old shock was already removed at this point so I couldn't try driving on it with bolts a bit loose to free it).

Finally, I got the new KONI installed with the wheel on (I propped up the shock to get it high enough to screw on the top nut and then with the van lifted was able to position the shock so I could attach the four bottom bolts).

I'm going to replace tires soon so I'll deal with the rusted on wheel then.

I did the passenger side the same way as I didn't want to deal with trying to remove the tire.

Usually when I figure how long it will take me to do a project I at least double how long people say it takes them to do a project, but this was a multiple of that!! Oh well, another learning experience.:rolleyes:

I haven't driven much on the new KONI's yet, but I can feel the ride to be much firmer, which I like. I already have the Agile shocks on the rear so I should be ready for LeMans now:thumbup:
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
...

However, my install turned out to be a long saga, because when I went to remove the driver side wheel it wouldn't come off. ...
Try this.

I tried a new trick today and it worked... 2 times. :thumbup:

Sometimes the Sprinter wheel lug bolt design has advantage over the more common wheel studs.

The rear wheels/tires on my 2006 Sprinter were rusted securely on to the hub. I needed to inspect the brake pads and also change out the thin tread rear tires. I found both of the rear wheels seized to the rotors. The fronts were stubborn, but some tapping here and there loosened them up.

Not so with the rears. Lots of tapping and hard bumps to the tires with a 16 pound sledgehammer left the stuck wheel laughing at me. I gave up on the passenger side. Before re-installing the lug bolts I sprayed PB Blaster on the hub and into the spaces between the wheel and hub. I re-installed the lug bolts figuring that maybe the penetrating oil would help after an overnight soak.

Hope springs eternal for the driver side so I went to try that wheel. Same thing only the lug bolts were so rusted I needed to drop the tire back to ground just to back the lug bolts off. (This was after loosening them a couple turns. Why don't mechanics believe in oil or grease on wheel fasteners? :idunno:)

Anyway, I ended up with all the lug bolts out, the wheel seized to the hub, and the tire partially loaded with my floor jack still supporting the Sprinter. Tapping the wheel with a hammer and using the sledgehammer on the tire did nothing to loosen things up on this side either.

I decided to try using a quite large ball peen hammer that basically fit the lug bolt tapered holes. I held the peen end into the lug bolt tapered holes and whacked the other end of the ball peen hammer with another large hammer. Note: Striking a hammer with another hammer is not recommended. Wear eye protection. Using a brass mallet to strike is safest, but it needs some weight.

After using a circular pattern to whack each tapered hole I noticed a change of sound as I struck the wheel. A couple more whacks and the wheel popped loose. After the driver side removal success I went back to the passenger PB Blaster side. I removed all of the lug bolts, lowered the tire to put weight on it and then just like the other side I whacked this wheel with the ball peen. After a short time that one also changed sounds and soon popped loose.

So it is worth trying the large ball peen hammer beaten into the tapered holes trick. My theory is that it bounces the steel of the wheel which transfers force to the stuck parts. The large ball peen end didn't damage the lug bolt holes at all. I don't know if lowering the jack to put weight on the wheel helped or not because I did that on both sides.

:cheers: vic
And another DIY trick that given time may help with rotors.

Good to hear you got it done.

For DIY types not in a hurry.

Last Fall I wanted to change out all the brakes on my 2006. Fronts went great. The rear rotors wouldn't budge. For some reason my rear brake parts are rusted more than any other area of the van. The pads and rotors were good enough for inspection. 3/8" thick pads.

I sprayed PB Blaster on the hubs and after doing some other work, greased the rotor center joint with some heavy duty wheel bearing grease before installing the wheels/tires. The idea was that the grease would soak in over time.

I didn't do the rear brakes until better summer weather. Some whacks with a hammer were enough to break the rotors free. Before re-assembly I brushed a thin coat of anti-seize on the inside rotor and hub faces. When I first started using anti-seize in that way I was concerned that it might migrate. I have been doing so for decades now with no problems.

Did my after the fact PB Blaster and grease treatment help? :idunno:

So what value might this story have? Pre-treatment may help. Any time you have your wheels off you might consider hitting the hub areas with some penetrating oil followed by grease before putting the wheels back on. Even after the fact it may soak in to help keep things free(er). It costs little and may help.

:2cents: vic
 
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bcman

Member
Hey All,

I just installed Koni struts on the front of my 2003 SHC 140 passenger van. I found that the adjustment range was approximately one full turn. Does this sound correct? The instructions online suggest the total adjustment range is 5 half turns.



I adjusted both to the middle of the range, and I'm pretty happy with the ride. Next time I have the wheels off I might try going to 75% stiff just to try it.
 

bcman

Member
Hey All,

I just installed Koni struts on the front of my 2003 SHC 140 passenger van. I found that the adjustment range was approximately one full turn. Does this sound correct? The instructions online suggest the total adjustment range is 5 half turns.
Just in case anyone is curious, I received this reply from Koni about the front struts:

This is correct. The Sprinter struts will only have approximately 1 full turn. The majority of the adjustable shocks, about 95% of them have an adjustment range of 5 half turns. There are a few however that have less due to the bypass valve preload spring that is used.
 

BipedalSnake

New member
88v77be
Make sure to use something to support the hub before moving the shock.
View attachment 6483
The hub will fall away from the van and you will risk damaging the brake line.

I eventually replace the jackstand with a hydraulic floor jack. I really needed to adjust the hub up and down to mount the Koni. The jackstand couldn't do that.

Dust boot removed from the oem shock and compared with the Koni.
View attachment 6484
The oem shock seems to act like a spring/damper (shaft wants to pop back out when I attempt to compress it) while the Koni acts like a damper (shaft stays put at whatever position I compress/extend the shaft to).

8mm Allen wrench was used to turn the shock to max. Shaft needs to be pushed all the way in and then turned clockwise (looking from the shaft end).
View attachment 6485
You don't really need the 8mm Allen wrench to adjust it. It just makes it easier.

OEM dust boot on the Koni
View attachment 6486
I used the oem nut to hold the rubber mount while I extended the shaft. You don't have to do this. If the shaft is already extended, you could probably just slip the dust boot on and fish it through the mount.

Since I was the only working on this I had to slip the shaft through the top and rest the bottom on the hub.
View attachment 6487
This way I could go back into the cab and slip on the nut. Notice that the dust sleeve can be separated from the rubber mount.

The top nut on the shock was just spun on loosely. The bottom four bolts were bolted on snuggly. I mounted the tire and lowered the van. For only the front shocks, tightening the four bolts and the top nut is done with the weight of the vehicle on the shock. I torque the four bolts to 136ft-lbs and used the impact wrench to snug the nut on top. I went on to use an open-end 24mm wrench and an 8mm Allen wrench to tighten it.

You would think replacing some shocks would be easy. It is, but for some reason it was taking me forever on the front driver side (first side to work on). I bolted the bottom of the shock to the hub first and then attempted to mount the top numerous times before I decided to do the top first. I think I wasted an hour trying to do this. :rolleyes:

So if you want to have an easier time, attach the top first and then attach the bottom to the hub.

Or heck, just do the bottom first and have fun with it. I'm sure I was doing something wrong. :hmmm:
Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
 

Thanasis

Member
Yesterday I replaced the OEM front shocks with Konis following sikwan's detailed write-up. Took me four hours. Local mechanic quoted $560 for labor.
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I am curious if anyone is on their second set of Koni Front Struts? I have now had them on my T1N for 12 years, and about 120K miles, carrying heavy loads here and there.

This past winter in very cold temps, I noticed major squeaking emitting from the front end over small bumps and road imperfections, which slowly dissipated after driving it for 20 minutes in the morning from a cold start.

I also have been prone to a loud "bottoming out sound" for a few years if I am loaded, and on the highway at highway speed, and hit a bump in the road from an uneven paving job, with say a 1 inch lip in the road, and hitting that results in a loud noise from under the cockpit floorboard.

I have looked at my composite spring and I cannot see any cracks, and the gap at the bump stops appears like there is about a 1/4 gap with about 1000 lb in the van on a flat surface.

My Koni's look aged and rusted on the outside, but that is more superficial vs what could be the current health of them as far as the gas inside the shocks.

I am leaning towards new front Koni's to fix the problem, but would hate to change them only to have to change the composite leaf spring afterwards as the problem remains.

Any tips to diagnose my issue would be greatly appreciated


Tibor
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
This past winter in very cold temps, I noticed major squeaking emitting from the front end over small bumps and road imperfections, which slowly dissipated after driving it for 20 minutes in the morning from a cold start.

I also have been prone to a loud "bottoming out sound" for a few years if I am loaded, and on the highway at highway speed, and hit a bump in the road from an uneven paving job, with say a 1 inch lip in the road, and hitting that results in a loud noise from under the cockpit floorboard.

I have looked at my composite spring and I cannot see any cracks, and the gap at the bump stops appears like there is about a 1/4 gap with about 1000 lb in the van on a flat surface.
My front exhibits the same squeaking that you're experiencing when it's cold or it's been sitting for a week or more. Normally it's the bushings rather than my shocks. I still have the origin Koni's and they still work.

I don't have the same experience that you're having with bottoming out mainly because my sprinter is never loaded heavily. But, I did know someone local to me that have experienced the bottoming out. When we did a visual, we could not tell whether the spring has been destroyed. He purchased a new spring and had it installed and it fixed the bottoming. He used his sprinter camping and offroading over washboard roads.

If I was in your position, I would look at replacing the front composite (to another one) before I would purchase a new set of Koni's.
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
Thank you for the prompt response Seek,

Do you know if when replacing the Leaf Spring, I should replace the Transverse Spring Seat, 2 x Front, plus 1x left, and 1 x right ( https://europarts-sd.com/item.asp?PID=2182 ) , or can they be reused?


You mentioned the bushings as the squeak you also hear, are you referring to these on the top and bottom of the struts ( https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001C9MREK/ref=nav_timeline_asin?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1 ) ? If so, I would change all of it out at once, and leave the Koni's.

Thanks again, and thank you as well on your hard efforts in upgrading the software on the forum!
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
Do you know if when replacing the Leaf Spring, I should replace the Transverse Spring Seat, 2 x Front, plus 1x left, and 1 x right ( https://europarts-sd.com/item.asp?PID=2182 ) , or can they be reused?
I'm sure they both can be reused, but the cost of each of them is only ~$12 and I don't know if you can replace them without disassembling the entire front end.

You mentioned the bushings as the squeak you also hear, are you referring to these on the top and bottom of the struts ( https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001C9MREK/ref=nav_timeline_asin?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1 ) ? If so, I would change all of it out at once, and leave the Koni's.
It would either be the spring seats, sway bar bushings, or maybe the shock bushings. I would inspect them to see if they're cracked . If not, I would add grease before replacing them. Another thing is if any of the bushings are cracked they can make an annoying knocking noise.

I can live with my squeaks because it goes away after it warms up or I've been daily driving it. I cannot live with the bottoming out or knocking.
 

kkanuck

LUV my T1N
I'm sure they both can be reused, but the cost of each of them is only ~$12 and I don't know if you can replace them without disassembling the entire front end.



It would either be the spring seats, sway bar bushings, or maybe the shock bushings. I would inspect them to see if they're cracked . If not, I would add grease before replacing them. Another thing is if any of the bushings are cracked they can make an annoying knocking noise.

I can live with my squeaks because it goes away after it warms up or I've been daily driving it. I cannot live with the bottoming out or knocking.

Thank you for your input. Much appreciated as always.
 

hulagun

Haulin' A** since 1974
Thanks, guys, this thread has been quite helpful.
 
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