2010 3500 RV build

hein

Van Guru
I made templates out of poster board and poked the holes with an awl. I used the push pins to hold the templates in place as I went along. With the template held in place by the pins, I dialed in the outer contour. Then I used the templates to rework my panels and at the same time verify their accuracy. Now, I've been digitizing the templates into the computer and will machine new panels to verify my data.
 
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GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
I made templates out of poster board and poked the holes with an awl. I used the push pins to hold the templates in place as I went along. With the template held in place by the pins, I dialed in the outer contour. Then I used the templates to rework my panels and at the same time verify their accuracy. Now, I've been digitizing the templates into the computer and will machine new panels to verify my data.
Hi Hein,

What tools do you use to digitize your templates?

George.
 

hein

Van Guru
Refitted the last of the wall panels last night. Again, all the wall panels were originally made by Van Specialties. They were nicely done so I'm glad I didn't mess one up. I removed and reworked them to upgrade the insulation, add outlets and other wiring, plus remount the lower ones with the push pins.

All my electrical boxes are mounted to the van chassis so the panels just slip over them. I had to transfer the box locations to the panels and use my jig saw to cut the holes in the panels. To accomplish this I made reference marks for the edges of the boxes that were outside the perimeter of the panel. (on adjacent panels, the ceiling or van sheet metal) Then I measured from the edge of the panel to the box and recorded the dimensions. Then I held the panel in place and transferred the reference marks and distances. Then took the panel into the shop, laid out the locations and cut the holes. Luckily, I didn't make any mistakes and all the holes lined up. Maybe some pictures will help clarify:

The dimensions are the distance in from the edge of the adjacent panel or reference line or in the picture below, the ceiling. The top edge of the LH box is 1 7/8 down from the ceiling and the bottom edge is 5 5/8 down from the ceiling. The blue lines locate the box sides and are transferred to the panel as it is held in place. Using the same dimensions from the edge of the panel at each mark locates the hole.



Measuring the distance up to the box from the adjacent panel.


Same concept horizontally with a vertical reference line marked on tape (no adjacent panel).
I used both vertical and horizontal schemes to verify the locations.
 
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hein

Van Guru
Installed some of the wall plates.

The following picture shows two outlets that will be in an overhead cabinet in the right rear over the galley. Left outlet is for audio/video wires going to the TV from a DVD/Blu-ray player, and maybe a Satellite receiver that will be in the cabinet. Wires hanging are: HDMI to TV; 12V power; Audio/video to dash head unit AV2-in. Inside the box there is an A/B switch to select between cable and antenna for the TV. Power for the devices is on the right. This 15A AC circuit continues over the ceiling and to the refrigerator and a convenience outlet on the left side of the van.



Picture below. TV outlet and TV arm located at the top of the wall behind the sliding door. The TV arm is secured directly to the van chassis with three 1/4-20 rivet nuts installed through an area of doubled up sheet metal on the interior of the C pillar.

Wires coming out of the box are TV connections for:
12V power (it's an AC/DC TV but only using DC)
HDMI cable from outlet in previous picture
Audio/Video IN from dash mounted Head Unit AV OUT
Audio OUT to HU AV2 IN for piping TV sound through the speakers system.
RF IN from A/B switch in previous picture
rocker switch is to completely power down the TV (no lights).
(I have a hand drawn diagram of all this in my build folder - so it's documented.)



Next picture is the GFI outlet that will serve the galley. And in the lower panel, two boxes where all AC and DC circuits exit the wall. The electrical chassis will be bolted to the floor there. Also shown is the programmable thermostat for the floor heat plugged into a dedicated GFI 15A 'electric heat' circuit. I'll also use this outlet for a small space heater. The other outlet in the picture is for a microwave oven that will be located in the galley cabinet. All the lower boxes still need face plates put on them.



Below: Computer rendering of the galley module (not yet finalized).

 
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hein

Van Guru
The round cut out is to take mass out of the microwave shelf. Incidentally, the rectangular opening on the side is where the electrical panel will present itself. The inverter will be under the microwave. I am considering MDF or maybe even LDF (low density fiberboard) for my cabinets. It machines easily and if it's sealed and painted holds up quite well. The front face of the galley cabinet shown is 1 1/4 thick material that allows insetting of the doors and drawers and generous rounded corners. I'm planning on a Corian top mostly because I have a 20ft piece of 3/4 thick Corian the stashed in the shop. I have a deep under mount bar sink specified.
 
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GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
The round cut out is to take mass out of the microwave shelf. Incidentally, the rectangular opening on the side is where the electrical panel will present itself. The inverter will be under the microwave. I am considering MDF or maybe even LDF (low density fiberboard) for my cabinets. It machines easily and if it's sealed and painted holds up quite well. The front face of the galley cabinet shown is 1 1/4 thick material that allows insetting of the doors and drawers and generous rounded corners. I'm planning on a Corian top mostly because I have a 20ft piece of 3/4 thick Corian the stashed in the shop. I have a deep under mount bar sink specified.
Where are you planning to locate a stove?, another cabinet?

George.
 

hein

Van Guru
To verify my CAD model, I measured the OEM floor including the tie down points I am aware of. This is the actual plywood floor which has about 1/4" clearance with the van chassis sides and around the fender wells.


www.impact3d.com/2010MBSprinter3500_170WB_OEM_floor.pdf

pdf is at .08 scale to fit on a 11x17 sheet, PM me if you want it at full scale or in another format. (-or want me to machine a custom floor for your van)
 
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hein

Van Guru
Painted the floor; 3 times. To get the color 'right'.

Started with Valspar textured porch paint in light grey. TOO light! and too blue (what?) Had it tinted darker which helped but brought out a pink/purple tone. nix on that... By this time our gallon was half empty. So I bought a quart of black and poured it in. 3rd time looks about right. Trying to match the other greys and the original color of the floor.

It's still drying so might get a little darker. We are planning on some throw rugs or a custom fitted carpet.



more pics:





before:
 
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hein

Van Guru
More floor pictures. Still not sure about the color. Opinions?
Plan is to install cabinets and then carpet the exposed areas so the floor won't be visible.

I put 3/8 diameter foam (stuff that's used behind caulk) all around the perimeter of the floor under the lower wall panels to keep debris from getting into that space. -details.

Threshold is hella-flush. I extended OEM floor 1 1/8" in front so it overlaps the lip of the front pads. Overall thickness of the floor (Rhino-liner + insulation + OEM plywood) is ~5/8".



Rear threshold trim strip. Painted with Rustoleum Aged Iron texture spray paint.


Front with the Coleman chair where I sit to visualize and plan the rest of the build.
 
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pfflyer

Well-known member
Nice job. Looks like it came from the factory or what should come from the factory. Color looks good to me. Compliments the pillar color in the picture. Go any lighter dirt will show more.
 

GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
Looks good, finding good coordinated colors is not easy.

I was trying to find Formica for the fridge door panel with analog, or matching, or complementary color to the grey HDPE I am using and decided on Charcoal Boomerang, great color with HDPE in sunny days but not good under warm fluorescent or incandescent lights.

Occasionally I use this tool to help me with colors - http://www.colorsontheweb.com/colorwizard.asp Dialing the first color requires some work.

George.
 

hein

Van Guru
While reworking the OEM floor, I made an extension to cover 30" of the sliding door step area. (see this post)

I decided it would be cool to make a support structure/storage box for the extension that utilizes the same cover used on the passenger front seat pedestal.(item 18 here) (see this post )

I measured the step area and designed a front piece and a bulkhead (2 req'd). It took machining a few test pieces to get the fit and configuration right. Parts are made out of 19mm Celtec (expanded PVC) and painted with Rustoleum texture paint. Completed assembly below. Installed picture coming up.



We tossed the toilet in so I could start planning how to design and fabricate the wet bath. It will be a while before anyone does any reading on this porcelain throne.

 
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hein

Van Guru
Thank you for the compliments, George.

I surface machined the corner with a 1/2" diameter ball nose cutter; .040" step over. Then lightly sanded it to remove the scallops. The edge around the cover openings was done with a corner rounding bit similar to what I used on your cabinet panels. I am pleased with the recessed look and plan to use the same design on the doors and drawers in my interior cabinets.

I did some test bonds with ordinary PVC cement and also a hobby grade thin cyanoacrylate (superglue); the latter of which appeared stronger. (I don't have much patience for drying glue.) I need to contact 3M to see if there is a special adhesive. I'm thinking about fabricating my bath enclosure out of Celtec.
 
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GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
For the overhead cabinets (1x5' & 2x5' or 1x10') I am planning to use 1/4" thick sliding doors. I don't have much experience with Celtec but do know that it is lower weight than HDPE. How is the expanded PVC edge would look like without additional processing?

Do you think that vibration noise in the sliding channel would be more pronounced in a likely more rigid PVC than an HDPE?

Thank you ,

George.
 

hein

Van Guru
Celtec could be nice for overhead cabinet sliding doors. The exposed edge is not that pretty but could be covered with some paint or a trim strip/channel. I tried to find some 1/4 wide T-molding but haven't had any luck. Celtec appears to have a low natural frequency so should be fairly quiet even if it bounces a little. Some foam along the top edge of the door might help keep it slightly loaded.
 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
I'm thinking about fabricating my bath enclosure out of Celtec.
You might consider Macrolux polycarbonate multi-wall panels for your shower fabricated by CO-EX Corp. I plan on using the Macrolux for the shower and ceiling and possibly walls on next conversion.
 

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