2010 3500 RV build

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Toilet is a Thetford Tecma Silence Plus.

And to get rid of the stinky smells, I mounted a 3" bilge fan between the bath rear wall and the rear door window panel. Behind the upholstered panel is a baffle that directs air out of the vent hood on the outside of the door.
speaking of.... what is the make/model of the vent cover on the rear door? I need one that will cover a drain/vent pipe fitting that has a flange dia. of abooot 2" and 0.125" depth. EDIT: I see you added a url for the vent cover... perchance you could measure the internal h/w/d of the clamshell?


also, there may or is an aerodynamic 'push' on the rear doors when in motion... will this be an issue with a possible reverse air flow through the vent system?
 
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hein

Van Guru
Inside roughly measured: 6.5" wide x 4.5" tall x 1.125" deep at the bottom; top is ~.75 deep. I agree that it could flow inwards while in motion. I have side exhaust but if it is a problem then a closure or flapper valve will be needed.


Update:
I have tested flow in while in motion at various speeds. There is always suction drawing air out of the bathroom.
 
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OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Inside roughly measured: 6.5" wide x 4.5" tall x 1.125" deep at the bottom; top is ~.75 deep. I agree that it could flow inwards while in motion. I have side exhaust but if it is a problem then a closure or flapper valve will be needed.
Great... those measurement work for me, even the 0.75" top, that allows be to mill down the flange depth even less than I anticipated. How's the build quality? Will it allow for automotive paint?
 

hein

Van Guru
The inside of the inner (closest to van center) bathroom wall is ~1/4 (6mm) thick and is sandwiched to the outside ~3/4 (19mm) thick wall pieces with contact cement. The opening is smaller so it forms the door stop. CAD rendering below shows the inner and outer walls separated.









The next step for the bath is to machine and fabricate the door. I ordered a 6ft black piano hinge at MMC. And that is a roll of 1/2 x .090" thick VHB tape. Also from McMaster-Carr.

 
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hein

Van Guru
I wasn't planning on using the VHB tape for the hinge. I chose it for the black paint. But it definitely would work with some thinner (.020) tape. Then no holes to drill or screws to drive at all. Hmmm....
 

hein

Van Guru
Being a HDPE (Starboard) man meself.... do you have experience with Seaboard/Starboard & thereby formed a comparison to Celtec?
Sorry about the spelling. My subconscious mind must think it looks better with a 'k' at the end. I've designed and worked with both materials. They each have many uses. It's not really worth comparing the two since they have so many unique qualities. However, they are both available in gray and black and machine well.

Besides, this is more interesting...

My battery install has been on hold due to some cable issues. Way-back-when, I had used a dummy battery to plan and measure my cable lengths. I had all the cables made up and ready to go. Then I changed my cable routing slightly to reduce lengths and had to rework some of the cables. While cutting them down, I noticed how easily I could pull off the lugs. I did some quick checking and came to the conclusion that no-one that sells battery cables (in my area) really crimps these correctly or even has the equipment (hydraulic) to do so.

So being familiar with hydraulic hose (designed skid steers) and aware of a place in town that assembles hoses; off I went with my cables. A picture can finish the story:

 
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hein

Van Guru
Thanks for the offer, George. These are heavy Magna-Lugs for 4/0 with an O.D. of .75" Probably overkill. My wife was office manager at the place where I took them so thankfully I didn't have trouble convincing them to use their hose crimper on my cable lugs.
 

hein

Van Guru
Working late assembling the cabinet. One reason I am using Celtec: Stuff sticks to it.

VHB tape to hold the angles on the rear edge of the shelves.


Angles go into pockets machined in the sides. (Sitting in an L is sturdier than sitting on it.) The angles were scrap I salvaged off an old cabinet.


The cabinet has an open back so the angles are there to support the rear edges of the 1/4 (6mm) thick shelves. The other 3 shelf edges fit into grooves machined into the front and 2 side panels.

Some threaded inserts in the back of the front panel for the hinges:


Thin CA glue capillaries completely into all the joints. Self positioning assembly needs no clamps. Instant cure. No fasteners.


Sanded and ready for paint:


One more battery detail done. Hold down brackets and long carriage bolts.


That's it for today.
 
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hein

Van Guru
Cabinet installed:



The front and forward walls are attached to the floor with 1/2 wide VHB tape. The rearward wall is screwed to the refrigerator support frame in 12 places. There are two VHB backed brackets holding the forward wall to the van chassis (picture below) using two 1/4-20 Rivet nuts each. The doors have Southco M1-62 Latches and E6-10-301-20 hinges. Total weight of the cabinet is just under 50 lbs.



couple more pictures:

Bottom doors: The vent next to the lower door is for the Espar D2 which is located in the bottom of the cabinet. That's a dehumidifier that I let run 24/7.


Below: Top extending over the refrigerator. Tough to see but there is a large open area toward the back over the fridge. I have allowed for lots of airflow even though it is self venting. Blob in the top left foreground is the corner of the air conditioner ceiling unit. It's not as low as it looks; I held the camera up against the ceiling for this shot.
 
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