2010 3500 RV build

hein

Van Guru
Forgot I had a login to that site and now recall browsing there before. I downloaded the Solidworks files. Looks like just the outside of the van. I'm mostly interested in the interior surfaces. I've been measuring and modeling those as I need to plan and build. I don't have a lot of extra geometry even though the model looks like a mass of pixels when zoomed out.
 
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hein

Van Guru
I added the outer body (from the grabcad SW download) to my model. It's a 170 extended and my van isn't so the back doesn't line up. The downloaded model is huge (lots of trimmed and untrimmed surfaces) so it really slows down performance if I try to work with it all shown. I mostly work on the layout model and discrete parts. Only use the top level assembly to check clearances and interferences.

 
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OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
I added the outer body (from the grabcad SW download) to my model. It's a 170 extended and my van isn't so the back doesn't line up. The downloaded model is huge (lots of trimmed and untrimmed surfaces) so it really slows down performance if I try to work with it all shown. I mostly work on the layout model and discrete parts. Only use the top level assembly to check clearances and interferences.

I can tell you where to slice the EXT... as I have one. Basically the D-pillar moves forward 15". On my 'metal', they just added/welded 15" 'pieces' on all 4 sides- floor, roof and walls. I can see the lines in your image.
 

hein

Van Guru
Thank you, Orion.

I exported the outside sheet metal from SW as one iges entity. I saw the extension pieces in the SW assembly so should be able to rework that into a regular length van. Those lines you see are the ends of the walls in my model. The rear roof extension is clear to see.
 
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OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Thank you, Orion.

I exported the outside sheet metal from SW as one iges entity. I saw the extension pieces in the SW assembly so should be able to rework that into a regular length van. Those lines you see are the ends of the walls in my model. The rear roof extension is clear to see.
Yep... I was referencing the rear roof panel (w/dimpled rails).
 

JohnY

Member
Adding a filter on the combustion air intake duct could have unintended and unwanted consequences. The filter will result in an increased flow resistance and less air flow through the intake duct than if it were absent. For example, Espar has a limit on max length of intake duct and also proscribes shortening the duct if the routing has a 90 degree bend. I presume this Espar guidance is to limit the flow resistance to ensure that adequate flow can be achieved under design conditions. Too little flow could result in out of spec fuel/air ratios and poor combustion. If your actual intake duct length is, say, the minimum of 8" (my recall without checking manuals) you may be ok with the filter. However, most just tuck the duct either in the cavity along the rocker panel or inside a frame to ensure a supply of clean, moisture free combustion air. Just my two cents.
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Adding a filter on the combustion air intake duct could have unintended and unwanted consequences. The filter will result in an increased flow resistance and less air flow through the intake duct than if it were absent. For example, Espar has a limit on max length of intake duct and also proscribes shortening the duct if the routing has a 90 degree bend. I presume this Espar guidance is to limit the flow resistance to ensure that adequate flow can be achieved under design conditions. Too little flow could result in out of spec fuel/air ratios and poor combustion. If your actual intake duct length is, say, the minimum of 8" (my recall without checking manuals) you may be ok with the filter. However, most just tuck the duct either in the cavity along the rocker panel or inside a frame to ensure a supply of clean, moisture free combustion air. Just my two cents.
This information is entirely correct. The addition of the filter is exposing you to performance issues and potential failures. Even if the filter has negligible effect when clean, it will be a dust/debris magnet and degrade rather quicky.

Starting at page 67 of the attached Espar Product List PDF are guidelines on ducting.


.
 

Attachments

hein

Van Guru
Machined and fit up some parts today. Shortly after I tied the back of the refrigerator to the wall, (see this post) I realized that would make it difficult to remove for service. I redesigned the installation so that the same chassis attachment points (rivet nuts) and aluminum brackets are now used to support the frame that goes around the front of the fridge. (see picture). These parts are made out of 19mm Celtec expanded PVC. Best part is no plywood smell.

I also machined the forward bathroom wall. (background). Some portions of these parts will be painted so I'll have to remove them for that. There are also some trim pieces that go down the sides and along the bottom of the fridge.



The refrigerator cabinet does not go up to the ceiling. I thought that would make the interior feel more spacious. Below is a rendering of the current design with some Southco hinges and latches. I have some louvered vent covers to go in the openings at the bottom.

 
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hein

Van Guru
Refrigerator front panel is assembled and painted. I added a horizontal support rib behind the vent openings and a flange along the bottom so it can be fastened to the floor. I clamped the pieces together. Then applied some thin CA (cyanoacrylate) along all sides of the joint. The glue wicks into the joint and sets in a few minutes. Then some sanding and a couple coats of Rustoleum Aged Iron texture paint.

 

hein

Van Guru
Thanks George. I work all day and night.

The panel ties the top of the fridge back to the wall. The main support is a welded stand. Below is an earlier picture. I've since added 4 bolts through the stand into rivet nuts in the bottom of the fridge frame.



more pics in this post
 
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hein

Van Guru
Few more pics from today's effort:

Espar D2 install. Gotta love the wiring mayhem. (below) The box mounted on the wall is the altitude sensor. Its harness has to be spliced in and a user supplied SPDT switch is needed to select between activating the sensor or enabling diagnostic mode on the controller. (If I understand that correctly.)



Couple of shots (below) from underneath the van showing the debris shield (painted with high heat black) and the exhaust/muffler setup.

2nd picture: Intake tube and fuel line (not visible behind the intake tube and threaded inside some 7/32" ID washer line) comes out the front of the enclosure and goes directly into a hole in the frame X-member. Wires hanging are for power and the dosing pump yet to be installed.

I am planning on a secondary shield coming down ahead of the tire because otherwise the whole area would become packed with snow and ice in winter conditions.





Paint barely dry but couldn't resist dropping the louvers into the fridge panel.

 
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hein

Van Guru
Enjoyed some wine with dinner and planning on some hot tub therapy. I don't crawl around under vehicles and jump up off the ground quite as quickly as I used to.

Edit: Ha ha, now I get it. I've had the fridge for almost year and it's yet to be plugged in. Soon; -picking up batteries tomorrow.
 
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hein

Van Guru
Celtec is turning out to be a great material for me. It does mar/scratch somewhat easily (with fingernails) but I can live with that. It is expanded pvc so has some insulating properties. It has no residual smell and is totally water proof.

Many of my panels will be painted with the Rustoleum texture paint which increases the durability of the Celtec significantly. It also is possible that the texture spray increases surface area significantly which allows the surface to absorb heat more readily and thereby reduces the cold-to-the-touch sensation common to smooth parts.

 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
I used expanded PVC for my ceiling. https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=17667&highlight=orton+ceiling&page=2 I bought it from the T-Slots (80/20 competitor) when I bought the extrusions. Works well and I do like the white color to brighten the interior. Easily conforms to curved roof. I do have a place where it squeaks occasionally. You are correct that it is soft and will mar easily. I held it in place with 1/4-20NC inserts. Used a SS fender washer under each bolt to distribute the load. Also used some scraps to replace the OEM cardboard over the rear and slider windows. Seems the cardboard does not like to get wet so it disintegrates.

I will probably use white double wall polycarbonate sheets for the next conversion. Should give a bit of insulation and should not mar. Probably will not look as nice as the expanded PVC.
 

hein

Van Guru
With the fridge frame installed, (no cold beers yet) I needed to add some framing to support the span of front bath wall. I cut some strips out of 3/4 thick Celtec, positioned them and then applied CA glue to the joint. 3-5 seconds later it's hella-stout.

I put the cross member (shown below) too low where it would have interfered with the bath faucet. It took some fairly aggressive whacks with a hammer to break it loose. The material itself broke out rather than the glue joint failing. A little bit of damage is still visible just below the new joint. I will run a drywall screw through each connection but I don't think it is necessary. The strip going up/down the wall is also 3/4 thick Celtec. It's flexible enough to follow the wall curve.



couple more pics for clarity:

Framing is minimal since the fridge provides structure.


Bath front wall set in place temporarily to make sure the faucet fits:
 
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