NAG1 Transmission Fluid Change

billintomahawk

'02 2.7 T!N Freightliner
'02 Freightliner OM612

A picture of the slot for the filter.



Then, rather than crawling around under the vehicle to find the TC drain plug know that it is marked on the harmonic balancer. Bring the mark up to the top and crawl under to find the plug on the bottom.







Hope this helps someone.

Mark it for next time.

bill in tomahawk
 
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gl21133

New member
Did this today on my new 06 to baseline all (most) maintenance. Great write up, very helpful. I was able to use a harbor freight 1/2” torque wrench with a 1-1/16” socket and sit in a way that I could rotate the crank while watching the torque converter. Laying straight on the driveway with the ratchet between my legs. YMMV, I’m 6’2” so my height didn’t hurt.
 

scotto

2005 3500 158wb SHC cargo
man, i gotta do this one day soon. trying to hold out until i have my lift installed. its kinda hard to get motivated to do work under a vehicle when you know you will have a nice lift before too long.

my van has 182,000 on it and i dont know the history as far as trans fluid change. i have had it for about 15,000 miles and everything is great on it. is there any reason not to do it if it has been neglected for this long? i know there are some old timers who used to say that if it goes too long, that changing out the fluid will dislodge a bunch of stuff that is built up in there and make it start to slip and act up. thats just talking about all cars n general. i have never put much stock in that, but open to comments.
 

Midwestdrifter

Engineer In Residence
That idea, that changing after so long is bad, is total bunk. That myth is created by people using a power flush to try and fix a malfunctioning transmission. In those cases the flush just exacerbates the debris building up due to failed parts.

The Sprinter NAG1 degrades its fluid due to oxidation and contamination, mainly from the very active TC clutch. Change it regularly, with the correct fluid for maximum life, and to ensure good performance.
 

smiller

2008 View J (2007 NCV3 3500)
I would agree with the above and on a van with 182k miles and an unknown service history a transmission fluid change would definitely be on my maintenance to-do list.
 

sethlp

2006 2500 140 HT 263k

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jagarwal

'04 158" Cargo, 200K
I made an error today while changing the transmission fluid. After reading the write up I thought that facing the engine meant facing the engine from underneath the van, thus I turned the crankshaft clockwise as the writeup said, however after further reading and seeing Doktor A's post regarding the correct direction being clockwise from the exterior front of the van I realize I have actually turned it CCW. I have yet to start the engine (Tranny drain pan is being re-installed now), is there a way to check that I haven't caused a timing problem and prevent any damage from trying to turn the engine over?

thanks for any tips, Im new to all this stuff.
 

Rocky59

New member
Hi All,
I have a 2010 NCV3 (ex Ambo) with a NAG1 that I brought with 74k on the clock and the trans shifted like a truck, clunkety clunk. (I honestly thought I brought a lemon !) After reading that they have been using this trans in the MB Cars since 2000 models I realized MB would not have a very good rap if they all shifted as bad as mine. So I decided to buy a trans filter kit, dipstick, new sump plug (and washer) and new trans oil and give the trans a service to see if that made a difference.
I drained about 5 - 6 liters (without draining the converter figuring I would do this a couple of times to flush away the rest of the gunk.) The old oil was thin like water, dirty brown with a burnt smell. Even with the few liters of dirty oil left in the converter I have to say it was literally like going from a truck to a limousine. The trans shift was smooth and the trans noise just went away. Every service now I just drain about 3 liters from the trans plug into a measuring container and put the exact same amount back in. Not ideal but each time I am diluting the dirty stuff and each time the trans just gets smoother and smoother and the old oil no longer smells burnt, looks redder and feels slipperier.
The shifts are now so smooth a couple of times when I use cruise control on the open road (at 110kph) and I accidentally bump the stick into 4th cog I do not even notice the down shift until I look down and see the engine revs have gone up and see the #4 where the #D should be !!! I can not recommend a trans service highly enough.
(Cost - MB 236.14 Trans Oil $20 per liter, new sump plug & washer $10)
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder
... Every service now I just drain about 3 liters from the trans plug into a measuring container and put the exact same amount back in. Not ideal but each time I am diluting the dirty stuff and each time the trans just gets smoother and smoother and the old oil no longer smells burnt, looks redder and feels slipperier.
...
Some recommend a partial slow change out schedule if a transmission hasn't been regularly serviced. The concern is that a complete change out can flush junk free or somehow otherwise shock the system.

I have no data. I'm merely being a parrot. Good to hear that it seems to be working for you. :thumbup:

:cheers: vic

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Added:
I have some tips for the Connector Body install.
Don't use the bolt to try and pull the connector into place. The bolt threads into a fitting on the circuit board. It is fragile.
Align and push the connector body in as far as it will go. After mostly in, use your fingers with the 7 mm socket to thread the bolt in until finger snug.

Note: The bolt sticking out prevents full seating. Screwing in the bolt finger tight and just pushing on the connector may yield similar results as my screwdriver levering method. The leverage made me feel better about fully seating without any strain on the circuit board screw mount.

Hold a kinda long chunk tip of a 2x2 against the tranny housing recess. Use a large screwdriver against that to lever/move the connector body in without forcing. Use the socket and your fingers to turn the screw in again. It should turn in some. Alternate the screwdriver pressure to opposite sides of the connector.
Repeat the above procedure until the screw no longer turns in using your fingers.
Use a ratchet handle to snug the bolt in. Try the 2x2 and screwdriver lever procedure one last time. Check that the bolt is still snug. If snug, you are done. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.


T1NtransConnectorRecess.jpg

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Added:
When the Connector Body on the 2006 started leaking it would leave quite a puddle. That was especially true when the transmission was completely heated after a long(er) trip. I never noticed any early slight drips. My habit is to watch areas parked for any signs of leaking. The leak came on fast and was bad enough that I was worried that the leaked fluid was from somewhere other than the connector body. Changing the connector body cured everything. I jacked the front end of the Sprinter up high and installed jack stands for the connector change. Very little fluid was lost.
 
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Alphacarina

2006 Itasca Navion 23H
Did this today on my new 06 to baseline all (most) maintenance. Great write up, very helpful. I was able to use a harbor freight 1/2” torque wrench with a 1-1/16” socket and sit in a way that I could rotate the crank while watching the torque converter. Laying straight on the driveway with the ratchet between my legs. YMMV, I’m 6’2” so my height didn’t hurt.
I did it on my new (to me) '06 Navion 23H which we bought last month with just 20,000 miles on it - I wanted to baseline all the maintenance as you mentioned. Trans & Converter drain, new filter & fluid, oil and filter change on the engine, new fuel filter and a new K & N air filter

My coach is on an '05 Dodge chassis and 'the book' said it uses the smaller drain plugs for the trans and converter, so I ordered 2 of the smaller ones with gaskets. Turns out the pan uses the larger one and the torque converter uses the smaller one, so I ended up reusing the one in the pan - So much for planning ahead

I used a 1 1/6th socket and a Craftsman ratchet to turn the crank and I was able to turn it and watch for the drain at the same time - The ratchet made it a quick and easy task, plus I didn't have to turn it very far before the drain plug appeared. I put the socket on the crank bolt and then carefully got the ratchet in there and onto the socket without touching the radiator. The under engine pan on mine was missing, so it was actually a pretty quick drain procedure. I let it drip overnight before removing the pan and changing the filter. This thread was a great help all around - I *almost* felt like I knew what I was doing each step of the way :clapping:

Don
 

caeppinger

New member
This is how I modified the one time use lock pin to be reusable, Just cut off the catch/protrusion on the lower end of pin. With the Pin inserted the cap will not come off, simply remove the Pin by pulling it out of the cap and the cap then comes off easily.

The top Pin is unmodified, the bottom Pin has been modified.
 

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mija5290

Member
Is the Penrite ATFBMV004 ok to use? Currently it's $36.99 for 4L at stupidcheapauto
 

Aqua Puttana

Poly - Thread Finder

Bill B.

Member
Im not sure if this counts a hijacking but since my torque converter is still dripping and I haven’t removed the pan Im curious about the Aftermarket high capacity nag1 drain pan for a 2500 conversion van that is likely to tow an ultra-lite dirt bike/rowboat trailer. I understand the drivetrain on the T1N isn’t going to nor should it pull a fifth wheeler but I do know that I don’t know much at all.
And P.S.(should have started with this) I drained the pan when the engine was warm Last night and Then I waited Overnight til the engine was well cooled before draining the torque converter. Before anyone asks... I started the task late evening, couldn’t find the Tiny damn TC drain Screw, and succumbed to exhaustion. Not ideal but I presume the transmission won’t explode after following through with the rest of this delightful task???
Final thought/question... I’m wondering if anyone has tried backfilling the precise amount removed through the drain plug(s). I only ask because of the complaints associated with filling via dipstick.? Better yet secure the pan to the transmission with long bolts on each corner(to allow a filler gap). After the pan’s refilled with the appropriate amount of fluid, evenly adjust the bolts to keep from dumping. Hmmm... I see now the nightmare unfolding before me. I’ll shut up and do as I’m told. 😬
 
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Bill B.

Member
Personally, I find this to be a fairly easy task thus far. I didn’t need to jack up the vehicle which is always nice. Drain, new filter, cleaned the connector, and refill done but I’ve yet to reconnect the battery and fire it up.
The hardest parts were consistent with what’s already been reported.(provably thread lock on drain plugs) 7.5 liters(I only bought 8 1-quart bottles.) poured into the filler with ease but after reading the SM Listed fluid capacities I should get clarification. I presume 5.5 liter “Service Fill” Refers to draining only the pan without removal, filter change, or draining the torque converter. Whereas a 7.7 liter “Overhaul Fill” Is all those. I didn’t rebuild the transmission.
For what it’s worth I used Shell 134 ATF
(MB 236.12 and 236.14)
My biggest concern is what I found in the pan(not on the magnet), primarily because I don’t understand how it bypassed the filter.
Metal bits in the bottom of the pan in addition to the black goo on the magnet.(image 1 & 2) The bits in the pan are presumably Not magnetic which rules out very little.
Should I be concerned?

Considering what I found in the pan I thought it would be interesting to cut open the filter and inspect the element. (Pictures 3-5) both sides and a close up. The filter trapped a lot of debris but it’s difficult see in photos.


Personally, I find this to be a fairly easy task thus far. I didn’t need to jack up the vehicle which is always nice. Drain, new filter, cleaned the connector, and refill done but I’ve yet to reconnect the battery and fire it up.
The hardest parts were consistent with what’s already been reported. 7.5 liters(I only bought 8 1-quart bottles.) poured into the filler with ease but after reading the SM Listed fluid capacities I should get clarification. I presume 5.5 liter “Service Fill” Refers to draining only the pan without removal, filter change, or draining the torque converter. Whereas a 7.7 liter “Overhaul Fill” Is all those. I didn’t rebuild the transmission.
For what it’s worth I used Shell 134 ATF
(MB 236.12 and 236.14)
My biggest concern is what I found in the pan(not on the magnet), primarily because I don’t understand how it bypassed the filter.
Metal bits in the bottom of the pan in addition to the black goo on the magnet.(image 1 & 2) The bits in the pan are presumably Not magnetic which rules out very little.
Should I be concerned?

Considering what I found in the pan I thought it would be interesting to cut open the filter and inspect the element. (Pictures 3-5) both sides and a close up. The filter trapped a lot of debris but it’s difficult see in photos.
 

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when I rotated the engine I didnt use a socket on the crankshaft, but grabbed the serpentine belt from underneath and was able the pull the belt and spin the engine... too lazy to get out from under and find the right socket and extension.
 

gogobrent

New member
I just attempted a fluid change on a 2004 with 348000. I had been having troubles with shifting from 2nd to 3rd. when the transmission tried to shift, it would go into 'neutral' before shifting. if I timed it just right I could just barely let off the pedal at the right rpms and it would shift a little smoother and I would continue driving. a few weeks ago it completely failed to go into 3rd, and I had to coast off the highway. I let it sit for a few minutes and got back home ok. I read the code, and it was incorrect gear ratio.

that's when I started digging through the transmission posts here. after hours of reading, I went ahead and bought all of my parts for a fluid change, hoping that it would solve the problems. I bought a filter, Fuchs fluid, T.c.m. connector, and gasket from Europarts along with a dipstick.

upon reading the dipstick it was definitely low. maybe about half full on the stick. I went ahead and drained, dropped the pan, dropped the valve body, and thoroughly cleaned and inspected the solenoids and sensors. much to my dismay, once I got to the torque convertor plug, I saw that whoever serviced it before had completely stripped it, so I decided to skip that for now and put everything back together and refilled with 6 liters of fluid.

now one thing I didn't do, that I wish I had, was disconnect the negative cable to the battery. when I started it up, I noticed I had 3 lights come on, the abs, wheel traction, and another yellow one next to it that I can't remember off hand. I also noticed that the shifter was stuck in park. I had to use a trick I learned from an old mechanic and stick a small screwdriver into the shifter housing to get it to disengage.

when driving, it was noticeably faster, and smoother, but the shift flare from 2 to 3rd was still there. im wondering if I didn't engage the selector valve properly, and it seems like there is too much fluid having not drained the torque convertor. im about to re drain and take a look, but any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
 

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