NAG1 Transmission Fluid Change

sikwan

06 T1N Can
Just executed my first transmission oil and filter change.No need to crank the cam to see the TC drainplug.Transmission in "N" insert a screwdriver (rectangular inspection opening) and turn TC until you see the drainplug,TC will turn very easy.
I tried doing that, but I had no leverage even when the transmission was set to neutral. I could turn it though from the other window (not the drain bolt window), but only when the torque converter spine (?) can be felt. After the turn I had no leverage and it was back to the rounded surface of the torque converter. Since I didn't want to mar up the surface, I didn't pursue it. Probably another reason why it took me so long to do this job. :smirk:
 

BaywoodBill

pre-Yuppiedom
Changing the fluid the first time took me about 5 hours with a lunch break in between, exchanging my clothes, and going for a drive and back and it got cold, windy, and rainy as the day progressed. I think the longest time was figuring out how to squeeze the wrench into the space available to turn the crankshaft. The pan drain bolt was a real pain to remove. Every time I tried removing the bolt, the van would move.
Thanks for that bit of information for "topping it off" on your write up. As I read your write up I kept thinking "I don't think I can do this". Now, with the top off, I'm pretty sure I don't even want to try. :rolleyes:
 

contractor

New member
Hey Seek

Any chance of you opening that spent filter and posting a few pics so we can see what kind of debris is being captured? Thanks:thumbup:
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
Redline D4 is a synthetic.

One of the recommended ATF (at least for NCV3s) is Shell 3353 (and T1Ns use the same NAG1 tranny, yes?). I was under the impression that 3353 was a mineral/conventional oil fluid.... but the Shell PDF indicates

The product is formulated using high-quality synthetic basic oils, combined with premium quality latest technology performance additives.
This product meets and exceeds the specific ATF requirements of MB for these applications.


Anyway, attached are two PDFs for comparision review.

-Jon
Looking at the two attached PDFs, it seems that D6 is the RedLine product possibly meeting the MB spec 236.12. D6 is recommended for the NAG2 (7 speed auto) on their PDF and the Shell product (on their PDF) is recommended for the NAG2 and meets MB spec 236.12 (which the '06 owner's manual recommends for the NAG1).
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Looking at the two attached PDFs, it seems that D6 is the RedLine product possibly meeting the MB spec 236.12. D6 is recommended for the NAG2 (7 speed auto) on their PDF and the Shell product (on their PDF) is recommended for the NAG2 and meets MB spec 236.12 (which the '06 owner's manual recommends for the NAG1).
I'm glad I'm not the only one to notice that. I wish RedlLine would explicity say D6 meets MB236.12.
 

BULBASOR

Active member
Dan at the dealer said BULASOR gets his NAG1 fluid changed at 60K, and that it can easily go to 80. I asked him if I could get it changed at 40K if I were willing to pay for it (it's 400 dollars for a change with the fluid and all) and Dan said that was too soon for BULBASOR. :thinking:
 

tegimr

2003 Pass 140 289000 mile
Dan at the dealer said BULASOR gets his NAG1 fluid changed at 60K, and that it can easily go to 80. I asked him if I could get it changed at 40K if I were willing to pay for it (it's 400 dollars for a change with the fluid and all) and Dan said that was too soon for BULBASOR. :thinking:
Cheaper than transmission troubles. $400 seems a bit steep, though. I'd be happy to change it for $400. :2cents:

Tim
 

hkpierce

'02 140 Hi BlueBlk Pass
Cheaper than transmission troubles. $400 seems a bit steep, though. I'd be happy to change it for $400.

Tim
Just the supplies for a transmission oil change are over $200. See below from my order from EuroParts:

Product Information:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Filter Service Kit-Automatic Transmission 2002-2008

Part#: 140 270 00 98

(Qty: 1 x $19.97)


Seal Ring-Drain Plug for Torque Converter & A/T Pan 2002-2008

Part#: 007603-010100

(Qty: 2 x $0.25)


Sprinter Transmission Service Dipstick 2002-2008

Part#: 140 589 15 21 00

(Qty: 1 x $48.97)


Transmission Fill Pipe Cap 2002-2008

Part#: 140 270 00 91

(Qty: 1 x $2.83)


Transmission Fill Pipe Cap Lock Pin 2002-2008

Part#: 140 991 00 55

(Qty: 1 x $0.70)


Transmission Fluid-MB Specification 236.12 2002-2008

Part#: 001 989 45 03

(Qty: 8 x $12.95)


Transmission Adapter Plug Housing 2002-2008

Part#: 203 540 02 53

(Qty: 1 x $9.75)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subtotal: $186.32

Tax: $0.00

S&H: $25.83

Final Total: $212.15
 

hkpierce

'02 140 Hi BlueBlk Pass
I changed my transmission oil last Friday. Taking SIKwan's instructions, I was able to complete it within two hours, including changing the "Transmission Adapter Plug Housing." This is the van's first transmission oil change, and the van has 64000 on it of non-abusive, mostly highway driving. I have no transmission problems other than the standard NAG1 shudder, which I know how to avoid.

I had no trouble with getting a 1 1/16 inch socket and ratchet in. In fact, contrary to Doktor A's recommendation of cutting down a socket, I found that the socket depth necessary to extend out of the pulley well. The ratchet then fit perfectly between the socket and the radiator. I have a 2002 Sprinter with a single AC compressor. The motor turned over very easily.

P5230007.JPG

I was stunned at the appearance of the oil and the whitish slime at the bottom of the pan. The oil was a reddish brown and not transparent. But no burnt smell whatsoever. The whitish slime at the bottom implied the detergent was taking out water.

Going step by step: The first picture shows that, at least my 2002 Düsseldorf assembled model has a grate magnet instead of the donut SIKwan's model has. While no picture, the grid had some dark colored slime, but nothing that seemed significant or different from SIKwan's:

P5230001.JPG

Any chance of you opening that spent filter and posting a few pics so we can see what kind of debris is being captured?
Picking up on Contractor's curiosity, I broke open the filter. The first picture shows the top view (filtered oil flowing into the transmission) of the filter:

P5230009.JPG

Other than the color, nothing particularly notable from my ignorant observation.

Now removing the filter and looking at the bottom of the filter (the intake side of the filter). Two things, on the metal part of the filter, note the white slime that also covered the bottom of my pan. Note how the transmission oil is actually beading on it. This, I guess, is the detergent and other additives pulling water and other stuff out of the oil. Also note the solids. Then, on the filter itself (remember, the orientation is actually the bottom of the filter) note the shiny metal flecks. There were no flecks of metal on the magnetic grid, nor anywhere else on the bottom of the oil pan - only here. Further, note the deposition pattern of the solids and the metal flecks - in line with the filters intake and through the center of the filter. I think this reflects the fluid dynamics of the oil and the weight of the flecks.


P5230010.JPG

Looking more closely at the filter, on the complete perimeter there was a ridge of (for want of a better or more accurate word) tiny flakes of rust. [Not likely rust as the magnet should have been covered with this stuff if it was - and it was not.] This stuff must be relatively light and is pushed to the far edges of the filter by the transmission oil flow.

P5230012.JPG

Being a firm believer of not panicking until something goes wrong and that what ever happened has happened, and there are no signs of transmission trouble, I installed the new filter, gaskets, and oil.
 
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hkpierce

'02 140 Hi BlueBlk Pass
I would (in Seeks case) however- have pre-emptively replaced the multi-pin socket/o-ring assembly. I will post a short posting on that subject soon. Doktor A

Listening to Doktor A (https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2815&highlight=plug), I also replaced the "Transmission Adapter Plug Housing." My OEM seals, as has not been the case with many, never leaked. The OEM o-rings are orange, and have a strange cottage-cheese feel.

P5230002.JPG

What you cannot see when taking the adapter off is the 7 mm headed screw in the center. The photo above shows the extension bar into the plug, and the lower photo the head of the screw.

P5230003.JPG

Doktor A mentions in his write-up about removing the plug. The white collar rotates about 90 degrees (up tab is locked, down tab unlocked) on the adapter has 3 internal pins that go into the radically angled threads of the plug (see photo above). To get the plug out, you must cut a tie that clamps the wires to a line. Note the picture below shows that I also mistakenly clipped the tie holding on a shield that protect the internals of the plug from debris coming from the front of the motor. It is not necessary to clip this tie, and the mistake is easily corrected.

P5230004.JPG
 
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hkpierce

'02 140 Hi BlueBlk Pass
The transmission oil I used was from EuroParts-SD. Note that specification of 236.12 is listed below the "US-quarts". The color was red - but very translucent.



P5230008.JPG
 
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sikwan

06 T1N Can
Thanks HKPierce! :bow:

Another thing I will be doing as my mileage increments toward another ATF change.
 

maxzoom

Member
What does the acronym "NAG1" stand for?
 

BULBASOR

Active member
New Automatic Gearbox - It's part of the secret of the T1N making a tiny little engine perform like a big V8.

Lots of complicated stuff but at the same time much more modular and simplified. Trade Offs.
 

maxzoom

Member

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