NAG1 Transmission Fluid Change

sikwan

06 T1N Can
EDIT: Additional to do list in addition to a fluid change can be found here.

The T1N was a tad over 20k miles when I decided to change the transmission fluid. Nothing out the ordinary, except changing it because I had the fluid and I wanted to get rid of the additive that I recently added.

Required Tools:
- OEM dipstick
- 5mm allen wrench (possibly 4 mm also)
- 27mm socket, with 1 inch (1/4") extension, and socket wrench with pivoting head
- T30 torx bit
- 9 quarts of ATF fluid (service manual recommends 7.7 liters for a full drain and fill).

Added from my 2006 experience. (vic here.) said:
My 2006 torque converter drain screw is 4 mm Allen on the forward side of the TC.
My 2004 torque converter drain screw is 5 mm Allen on the aft side of the TC. (Less messy to drain.)
The 2006 5 mm pan drain plug was so tight I just did a tilt pan drain (messy).
Without the rear air conditioning 2 belt pulley, a standard 1 1/16" socket fits (27 mm). Actually I used a 1 1/8" 12 point. (My craftsman 1/2" drive set doesn't include 1 1/16".) ONLY rotate the engine clockwise as you face the front of the engine. (Righty tighty.)
Also there's a nice Write-up by Deancm for NCV3. Much applies to T1N's, but as one example, eg. -the frame doesn't need to be shifted for the T1N.
http://www.sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=40609
As I mentioned earlier in this thread-the drain plug is removed (or attempted to be removed) with an Allen bit- not a torx bit. 5mm to be exact.

I have never stripped a drain plug's internal socket head but I have deformed a very high strength Snap-on Allen bit in the attempt. Doktor A
NAG1 Transmission.
IMGP0015.JPG
Pan drain bolt to the left and rectangular rubber plugs on the bottom of the bell housing.

Close up of the rectangular rubber plugs
IMGP0013.JPG
Remove plugs to access torque converter drain bolt.

Close up of the pan drain bolt and 2 of the 6 torx bolts that fasten the pan to the transmission.
IMGP0014.JPG
5mm allen wrench to remove the drain bolt and a T30 torx bit to remove the 6 pan bolts.

I don't think you need a wrench this long, but this is all I had for a pivoting head. You'll see what I mean.
IMGP0021.JPG
27mm socket, 1 inch (1/4") extension, and wrench with pivoting head.

Here's where the wrench is attached to the crankshaft bolt. Unclipped the hose attachment for full wrench swing.
IMGP0017.JPG
It would've been easier to use a ratcheting wrench, but I couldn't get it in there without the pivoting head. Be careful to not hit the radiator fins.

DRAIN TC without using the plug?

The method below worked to drain a T1N NAG1 transmission TC and pan. I'd suggest trying it on your NCV3. If it works it's easier than messing with the TC plug even when one is included. The mentioned 7.5 qts. is about what I get doing a T1N pan/TC drain. An overnight drain will get more out than even a couple hours will. With the pan off I noticed that the fluid drips off the upper parts for quite some time = made things messy.

Assuming the ramps do the job.

To take this drain method my extra step. Use the ramps for your draining and just change the filter every other service. The filter on the T1N's was sized for "Once only at 80,000 miles" and then no more per the 2006 Operator Manual. Even knowing that "Once only" service schedule wasn't realistic, my logic is with a 40 - 60k OCI, the transmission filter is good for every other service.

View attachment 109834

First off, sorry for the wall of text below. I wasn't sure how to tell this story shorter.
...

So, I built myself some 6" ramps out of 2x10s (couldn't quite get myself to trust a plastic Rhino ramp for what I supposed would be long-term elevation). There's lots of room under a Sprinter, but I'm a big guy, and I like my elbow room.

With the front end elevated 6", I started draining the transmission pan. Here was my first surprise. I used my 7 quart drain pan, expecting to only get the normal 4 quarts out of the pan.

When I came back, the fluid had filled the pan to just barely under the edge. After dropping the pan and getting the rest of the fluid out of the bottom (and with what came out of the valve body), I drained about 7.5 quarts.

I had originally planned on draining the torque converter, as recommended on these forums. However, it was apparent from the amount of fluid that the converter had already drained.

The only logical conclusion in my brain is that with the front of the van up on 6" ramps, the torque converter drained back down into the transmission pan. This meant I didn't have to mess around with turning the crankshaft, digging in for the torque converter drain bolt, etc.

...

My short, short list of takeaways:

Driving up on ramps to drain the torque converter is way easier.
The Autel MD802 is awesome (for this vehicle).
Redoing the valve body was really easy to do with the above video help.
Happy with the valve replacements!
If I can do this, anyone can. This is my first major job on any car ever.

-Aaron
Added:

My 2006 torque converter drain screw is 4 mm Allen on the forward side of the TC.
My 2004 torque converter drain screw is 5 mm Allen on the aft side of the TC. (Less messy to drain.)
The 2006 5 mm pan drain plug was so tight I just did a tilt pan drain (messy).
Without the rear air conditioning 2 belt pulley, a standard 1 1/16" socket fits (27 mm). Actually I used a 1 1/8" 12 point. (My craftsman 1/2" drive set doesn't include 1 1/16".) ONLY rotate the engine clockwise as you face the front of the engine. (Righty tighty.)
Also there's a nice Write-up by Deancm for NCV3. Much applies to T1N's, but as one example, eg. -the frame doesn't need to be shifted for the T1N.

Added2:
I agree with the feel method. The pan bolts hold the spacer blocks into place. The blocks automatically set the proper spacing for the reusable rubber seal. Tight enough. Don't strip them.

Same with the torque converter drain bolt. Tight enough. Don't strip it.

I did find this during a search.

Connector body install
"Use ATF to lube the new O-rings -also lube the exterior of the new socket and carefully align the 3 indexing slots. They will assure subsequent correct alignment of the delicate elec pins within the socket holes. Once the slots are aligned exert pressure (don't worry you won't harm it) on the socket's outer end - the o-rings will compress and the socket will "pop" into position. Make certain its fully seated then tighten the small bolt to correct torque. Using a stubby 1/4" drive wrench w/7mm socket- only about 22 in./lbs. is sufficient (gentle hand torque-if you lack a small torque wrench)." Doktor A

I cleaned everything on the transmission thoroughly, pan, above pan and everywhere I could reach. I dropped the pan, changed the fluid from pan and converter, changed strainer, used new rubber gasket.
Torqued the bolts 70in/lbs.

My good deed for the day. Not needed as posted above

“ Bolts Oil pan NM 8 inch lbs 71
“Plug oil pan” 20NM 177 inch lbs

Dont know about the torque converter drain bolt maybe its the same as the trans pan drain bolt. Dont see in on the list.
 
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sikwan

06 T1N Can
The service manual says to turn the crankshaft in a clockwise direction until the torque converter drain bolt can be seen. It was easier for me to turn it counter-clockwise, when looking towards the front of the vehicle, so I don't think there is any damage to doing it counter-clockwise except for loosening the nut on the crankshaft pulley. As long as the transmission is set to neutral, I don't think there will be any danger of loosening the crankshaft pulley. At least I didn't have any problem.

I shifted the transmission to neutral, laid on the ground with my feet towards the front of the vehicle and positioned my head right underneath the bell housing window. I would turn the motor while watching for the drain bolt. I would worm my way back to the front, reposition the wrench, worm back, and repeat the process until I saw the drain bolt.

Drain bolt finally appears.
IMGP0016.JPG
5mm allen wrench to remove.

I decided to drain the pan first.
IMGP0024.JPG
The pan drain bolt was :censored: tight on there. Copper washer was reused.

I decided to drape a plastic over the cross member before removing the torque converter drain bolt.
IMGP0027.JPG
I'm glad I did, otherwise it would've been an oily mess.

WARNING: I didn't find the washer for the drain bolt. :thinking: It might have fallen into the collection bucket, but my fishing attempts were futile. Since, I couldn't find the drain bolt washer for the torque converter and I didn't want to install the bolt without a washer, I used a brass washer I had around (plenty) that fit fine. You might want to make sure you find that washer when draining or at least purchase one to have around. I'll insert a dimension for the washer that I used.

6 T30 bolts with clips were removed to remove the pan.
IMGP0028.JPG
Pan with some fluid left in it. The donut next to the drain is a magnet.

Wiped off a lot of metal shavings from the magnetic donut.
IMGP0029.JPG
Metal shavings were on there like a muddy paste.
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
The new filter. Notice the o-ring on the tube.
IMGP0034.JPG
Make sure the plastic tab to the right is positioned correctly when mounting.

The old filter.
IMGP0035.JPG

A cleaned up transmission pan with new gasket.
IMGP0037.JPG

Oops, I almost forgot the magnet.
IMGP0038.JPG
Magnet just sticks to the steel pan.

Old filter is pulled off and the new one attached.
IMGP0039.JPG
Filter is attached using friction of the o-ring.
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
Make sure to make a note of the pan clips.
IMGP0041.JPG
There are a total of six, 5 of the left, and 1 of the right.

Bolts go through the holes next to the numbers.
IMGP0042.JPG
The clip on the right goes to the forward most, driver's side of the pan. It doesn't attach to anything though.

I purchased 9 quarts of this at $7.95 a piece (shipping extra).
IMGP0044.JPG

Filling the tranmission was a laborious task. :snore:
IMGP0043.JPG

I first filled it with 5 quarts, turned on the engine, and set the transmission to Drive with the parking brake and front wheel chocks. Shifting it into Drive will start to pump most of the fluid into the torque converter. I then filled it with 2.5 more quarts and measured it. It was definitely low, but it wasn't at operating temp, so I went for a drive around town.

Coming back, I set up the parking brake and front wheel chocks, shifted it into Drive, and measured it. I could see the fluid just on the low side. I filled up the remaining half a quart for a total of 8 quarts (service manual recommendation on a full drain and fill), measured and was at the half way mark on the dipstick. I left it at that so that the fluid had more room to expand.

EDIT: I made a mistake with above cross out. Level must be checked with transmission set to PARK with the engine running.
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
It was easier for me to turn it counter-clockwise, when looking towards the front of the vehicle, so I don't think there is any damage to doing it counter-clockwise except for loosening the nut on the crankshaft pulley. As long as the transmission is set to neutral, I don't think there will be any danger of loosening the crankshaft pulley. At least I didn't have any problem.
I think the intent of the admonition in the service manual is to turn the crankshaft in the normal direction so the slack in the chain is always taken up by the tensioner and doesn't appear on the side w/o the tensioner. Turning in the wrong direction might risk the chain jumping a tooth or two on one of the sprockets? Or maybe interference between a piston and a valve? Can't tell from your write-up whether you turned in the normal direction.

Noticed that the outside of your torque converter had a coating of fluid - maybe a seal leak?
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
I purchased 9 quarts of this.
Is this MB spec 236.12 fluid? Did you measure fluid temp and correct the level target for temp?
 

talkinghorse43

Active member
The T1N was a tad over 20k miles when I decided to change the transmission fluid. Nothing out the ordinary, except changing it because I had the fluid and I wanted to get rid of the additive that I recently added.
A problem with the additive?
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
Turning in the wrong direction might risk the chain jumping a tooth or two on one of the sprockets?
Can't see a reason why that would happen when it's this new. At the speed that I was turning, I would be pretty disappointed (more likely using expletives) that my timing or timing chain would jump off because of turning the wrong direction. :idunno:

Turning it clockwise (looking towards the front of the vehicle) will go with the direction of the motor when running. I turned it counter-clockwise.

Noticed that the outside of your torque converter had a coating of fluid - maybe a seal leak?
When I pulled the rubber plugs from the bell housing, it was wet. Don't know if this is normal from production, or because of the missing washer from the drain plug. The torque converter did not show any signs of fluid leakage; essentially dry to the touch. The yellow/orangey stain on the bell housing is some type of sprayed-on rust (I think?) coating. The coating is also found in many parts of my engine.

Is this MB spec 236.12 fluid? Did you measure fluid temp and correct the level target for temp?
According to Redline it is, but I'll have to double check. I know I asked them before ordering.

EDIT: http://www.sprinter-source.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2663&postcount=31

I didn't measure fluid temp.

A problem with the additive?
No problem found with the additive nor did it produce a solution to the RSN.
 

contractor

New member
Excellent post Seek :clapping: I plan on doing my transmission in the Spring (since it is presently 10F). Thank you for the caveat pertaining to the torque converter fastener and buying a bolt and washer in advance is a nice insurance policy. My transmission access covers are also very oily too and hopefully that is cosmoline (that is what the dealer said).
 

abittenbinder

Doktor A (864-623-9110)
Someone suggested-"turning engine CCW might cause chain to jump a few teeth on sprocket."

Can't see a reason why that would happen when it's this new. At the speed that I was turning, I would be pretty disappointed (more likely using expletives) that my timing or timing chain would jump off because of turning the wrong direction. :idunno:
Turning it clockwise (looking towards the front of the vehicle) will go with the direction of the motor when running. I turned it counter-clockwise.
There are several issues regarding rotation of the Sprinter 5 cylinder engine in a counterclockwise direction(viewed head-on from front).

If you sketch a diagram of the timing chain, crank and cam sprockets and the location and orientation of the curved tensioning rail as well as its pivot point and its contact point with the chain tensioner-the kinematics become clear.

The tensioner features a mechanical spring but the pressure exerted against the tensioning rail is also supplemented by engine oil pressure when the engine is running. The engine oil pressure also feeds a hydraulic damper integrated in the tensioner. With engine off and spring tension alone acting on the curved tensioning rail(sans damping action due to possible leak down over time while stationary), the forces acting on the curved tensioning rail, during CCW turning, could defect the tensioner and the tensioning rail enough to temporarily affect cam timing-with possible though not likely, negative results.

In addition, if the engine was not then later again carefully manually rotated in a clockwise direction (after CCW rotation), the above mentioned, induced slack, could cause very high momentary stresses when the engine is restarted.

A very high mileage engine, which may be testing the span limits of its chain tensioner, would only intensify these effects.

Bottom line- please remember to turn engine CLOCKWISE ONLY. Doktor A
 
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hkpierce

'02 140 Hi BlueBlk Pass
Bottom line- please remember to turn engine CLOCKWISE ONLY. Doktor A
Andy: Given that Seek indicated difficulty in turning the crank clockwise, any suggestions on techniques to turn it clockwise and without bending the fins on the radiator?

Thanks Seek for the great write-up and pictures. A spring project for me, it is too cold now (10 degrees also - and I am still warming up from taking the Scouts to the Klondike Derby - speaking of which, to my great surprise my 5-year OEM battery started the van right up after 2 days of not running in that cold).
 

sikwan

06 T1N Can
Andy: Given that Seek indicated difficulty in turning the crank clockwise, any suggestions on techniques to turn it clockwise and without bending the fins on the radiator?
HK...it wasn't difficult at all to turn it clockwise. I may have made it sound like it was. The force to turn it clockwise was the same either direction, and the force was light. It may have been very light due to the length of the wrench.

Lying down on the ground with barely any room to move around underneath, it was easier to have the wrench positioned parallel to the ground and pulled downward, turning the engine counter-clockwise. It would have been just as easy turning it clockwise, but the wrench would have to be hanging down and pushed upward to its horizontal position shown in the picture.
 

BaywoodBill

pre-Yuppiedom
Seek, thank you very much for this detailed write-up and thanks Dr. A for the counterclockwise caveat.

Seek, did you (shame on me for not reading it thoroughly:snore:) clean the electrical stuff that Dr. A talked about in an earlier post?
 

abittenbinder

Doktor A (864-623-9110)
Seek, thank you very much for this detailed write-up and thanks Dr. A for the counterclockwise caveat.

Seek, did you (shame on me for not reading it thoroughly:snore:) clean the electrical stuff that Dr. A talked about in an earlier post?
With low mileage and the lack of severe duty use -that would have been useful only for curiosity and educational purposes. BTW-"electrical stuff" is somewhat of a misnomer. The speed sensors in particular, are strong magnets and are the primary focus of that cleaning procedure alert.

I would (in Seeks case) however- have pre-emptively replaced the multi-pin socket/o-ring assembly. I will post a short posting on that subject soon. Doktor A
 
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sikwan

06 T1N Can
Seek, did you (shame on me for not reading it thoroughly:snore:) clean the electrical stuff that Dr. A talked about in an earlier post?
I didn't. Changing the fluid the first time took me about 5 hours with a lunch break in between, exchanging my clothes, and going for a drive and back (not to mention taking pictures :smirk:). And, I didn't start until 11:00am and it got cold, windy, and rainy as the day progressed. I think the longest time was figuring out how to squeeze the wrench into the space available to turn the crankshaft. The pan drain bolt was a real pain to remove. Every time I tried removing the bolt, the van would move. That's how tight it was on the pan. I was worried at some point that I was turning the bolt the wrong way, tightening it rather than loosening it.

My goal was to change the fluid, filter, and gasket and nothing else. I didn't have the luxury to do the other things. Now that I can do it in my sleep, I'm sure I can do this fluid change within 2 hours and probably look at other things.
 

abittenbinder

Doktor A (864-623-9110)
I think the longest time was figuring out how to squeeze the wrench into the space available to turn the crankshaft. The pan drain bolt was a real pain to remove.
The transmission pan drain plugs are ALWAYS too tight at first fluid change. I suspect they slapped the wrists of the assembly line worker after several dropped off- and now he has set his air wrench to- "friction weld" mode.

Regarding the access to the recessed pulley bolt head-I recommend anyone who does this procedure often- purchase a cheap socket and cut its length down to minimum head engagement- to make entry easy(and using just the right length short extension , as needed).

BTW-That pulley bolt is torqued to several hundred ft./lbs. It is in no danger of being broken loose by turning the pulley CCW. But now you know why the CW caution is important. Doktor A
 
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jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Is this MB spec 236.12 fluid? Did you measure fluid temp and correct the level target for temp?
Redline D4 is a synthetic.

One of the recommended ATF (at least for NCV3s) is Shell 3353 (and T1Ns use the same NAG1 tranny, yes?). I was under the impression that 3353 was a mineral/conventional oil fluid.... but the Shell PDF indicates

The product is formulated using high-quality synthetic basic oils, combined with premium quality latest technology performance additives.
This product meets and exceeds the specific ATF requirements of MB for these applications.


Anyway, attached are two PDFs for comparision review.

-Jon
 

Attachments

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kurt

New member
Someone suggested-"turning engine CCW might cause chain to jump a few teeth on sprocket."



There are several issues regarding rotation of the Sprinter 5 cylinder engine in a counterclockwise direction(viewed head-on from front).

If you sketch a diagram of the timing chain, crank and cam sprockets and the location and orientation of the curved tensioning rail as well as its pivot point and its contact point with the chain tensioner-the kinematics become clear.

The tensioner features a mechanical spring but the pressure exerted against the tensioning rail is also supplemented by engine oil pressure when the engine is running. The engine oil pressure also feeds a hydraulic damper integrated in the tensioner. With engine off and spring tension alone acting on the curved tensioning rail(sans damping action due to possible leak down over time while stationary), the forces acting on the curved tensioning rail, during CCW turning, could defect the tensioner and the tensioning rail enough to temporarily affect cam timing-with possible though not likely, negative results.

In addition, if the engine was not then later again carefully manually rotated in a clockwise direction (after CCW rotation), the above mentioned, induced slack, could cause very high momentary stresses when the engine is restarted.

A very high mileage engine, which may be testing the span limits of its chain tensioner, would only intensify these effects.

Bottom line- please remember to turn engine CLOCKWISE ONLY. Doktor A
Just executed my first transmission oil and filter change.No need to crank the cam to see the TC drainplug.Transmission in "N" insert a screwdriver (rectangular inspection opening) and turn TC until you see the drainplug,TC will turn very easy.

Back to inline transmission filter.Concerning pluged filter creating back pressor and other problems etc
In my research I found all transmission inline filters have "Anti-Drainback Valve plus a 20 PSID By-Pass Valve." for safety.
 

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