2010 Fuel Filter Replacement

Kat

Katmobile
Since this was my first attempt at changing the fuel filter on my 2010 van I took photos mainly so I would know how to put everything back together again. Because things are different with different years, I thought the photos and explanations might help someone else. I didn't have a repair manual or anything, so I basically had to figure it out myself.

The fuel filter is underneath the engine air filter, so the air filter needs to be removed. There are 2 plastic arms that extend towards the front of the engine compartment (near the grille). They have pegs that fit into a couple of rubber grommets. Use firm, steady pressure to pull them up and out of the rubber grommets. Then pull the filter towards you a bit until it unhooks in the back. It has an electrical connection on the left side, so try to be careful with the wiring when moving the air cleaner. Loosen the clamp on the large hose on the left side of the air filter and pull the hose off of the air filter. Once the air filter is loose, flip it over to the left (upside down) to get it out of the way. The intake hose on the right comes with it, so there's no need to remove that separately.

Photo of air filter removal:

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This is what it looks like once the air filter is out of the way. The fuel filter is sort of in the middle of the picture:

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You need a size E 10 socket or wrench (socket is easier) to remove the 2 bolts that secure the square black box (I have no idea what this is!). I also removed the flat metal bracket it sits on in order to have more room to work. Remove the 2 bolts that secure the metal bracket. Note: While the bolts are the same diameter, the bolts that secure the black box are a little shorter than the ones that secure the metal bracket.:

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Kat

(to be continued...)
 
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Kat

Katmobile
Next I removed the intake hose to the compressor housing of turbo. You can use use a flat head screw driver to loosen the clamp. Once loose, move it over to the side.

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As you can see, there is an assortment of hoses and electrical connections that will need to be unhooked. (In this photo I have already removed the 2 torx head bolts that attach the WIF sensor to the fuel filter).

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The one with the fabric braided hose that runs from the top of the filter to the lower left is attached to the water in fuel (WIF) sensor. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE THIS CONNECTOR UNTIL YOU KNOW HOW!!! I can't stress this enough. I broke mine as have most people who have attempted their 1st fuel filter change. As I understand it, you need to push IN on the white clip (which is supposed to spread out the 2 black tabs on the sides) while pulling on the top of the connector at the same time. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PRY AT THE SIDES OF THE 2 CLIPS OR THEY WILL BREAK! If you break the black clips, you will either need to replace the entire line, or come up with a MacGyver fix like I did. If you don't, this part could come loose, fuel will go all over your engine compartment and you may need to be towed to a repair shop. See this thread called “warning about diy fuel filter replacement”:
https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9926


This is a photo of the WIF hose connector (from another thread). Once the 2 black tabs are released by pressure from the white clip, it is just held in the sensor by the green "O" ring (it doesn't screw off or anything).

new-fuel-hose-with-clips.jpg


Like most people, I had no intention of trying to reuse the OEM fuel hose clamps. Instead, I used fuel injection clamps that I bought at an auto supply store. Fuel injection clamps have slightly rolled edges, hold higher pressure, and are designed for fuel lines (Don't use the perforated type). Anyhow, I slipped a very thin screw driver under the top part of the OEM clamps to loosen them.

There are a couple of black plastic clips running from one hose to another... unhook one of side of the clips to help get the hoses out of the way.

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There are 2 locking electrical connectors that need to be removed. One is above and to the left of the fuel filter and the other is hooked to the WIF sensor. I had no clue how to remove them, but saw in one post (photo to follow) that you need to pull the little white tabs out (away) until you hear a click. I was able to pull the tabs out a bit (you don't totally remove them), but the connectors still wouldn't come loose. Perhaps you can find another thread that explains their proper removal. Be careful, the white tabs are also delicate and easy to break. Because I couldn't find the answer for proper removal, I ended up slipping the small/thin flat head screw driver in the back side and then the connections came loose. But I was very careful/gentle...

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Kat

(to be continued)
 

Kat

Katmobile
This photo is from another thread, but it shows the direction to pull the white tabs.... supposedly until they click. Maybe that is all a guy needs to do to be able to undo the electrical connectors. (Admittedly, I am a weakling and often have to resort to other methods to accomplish a task).

Image.jpg


Sorry, this isn't a very good photo. What I'm trying to show is that you will need an allen wrench in order to loosen the bolt on the fuel filter clamp. It's on the back side of the filter. I think the allen wrench size is 5 mm (mine has a #5 stamped on it). I found that it's also much easier if you take the allen wrench off of the ring. :bash: Don't remove the bolt from the clamp, just back it out enough to get the filter loose. By now, everything should be unhooked from the filter and you should be able to pull or wiggle it out of the engine compartment... it's kind of a tight fit. (BTW... if you haven't figured it out already, you should wear gloves and have a rag near the filter when you are working to catch any drips of fuel).

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Next, you need to pull the WIF sensor out of the old oil filter... easier said than done. Either I am a complete weakling or it's not possible to just pull the sensor out with your bare hands. So I put it in the vise and used 2 flat head screwdrivers to pry it up from the filter. If you look near the bottom of the sensor you can see a couple of little notches. That's where I inserted the screwdrivers and then I carefully pried it up.

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Once the sensor is out partway, you can pull the rest of it out with your hands.

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Replace all four of the "O" rings on the stem of the WIF sensor (they come with the new filter). I also read on another thread that it might be a good idea to pour some diesel fuel into the new filter to make it easier to prime, so I did that before inserting the WIF sensor into the new filter. I tried with all of my might and my full body weight to push the WIF sensor into the new filter without success. So I resorted to carefully tapping it into place using a small piece of wood (as a buffer) and a hammer. Worked like a charm!

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Now you should be ready to install the new filter, in basically the reverse order of removing it.

Because I lost one of the torx head bolts that fasten the WIF sensor to the filter, I haven't had a chance to try priming the filter by turning the key on and off as mentioned in other posts. Hopefully I should have a follow-up on how that went tomorrow.


Kat
 

Kat

Katmobile
Also, I want to point out that if you happened to break the tabs off of the fitting on the WIF sensor, the trick of trying to exchange the "thumbscrew on the water drain", indicated in the post below, it won't work on a 2010 Sprinter. MB changed that fitting to match the one on the WIF sensor, so you have two (2) of the same connectors with the flimsy black tabs. :thumbdown: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12514 You will either have to buy a whole new line with new fittings and install it (or have it installed), or you will have to come up with a fix that will keep this WIF fitting from popping out. If you don't you might end up like this: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9926

Here are photos of the other end of the WIF line on the 2010. In the first picture, my thumb is pointing towards the connector. You can see in the second photo that it is near the oil dip stick:

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Kat
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
The forum's needed a write up for OM642.898 engine fuel filter replacement.
I've asked a few 2010+ owners to do this, when they've come on the forum, lost and frustrated.

Thanks for taking the time to photograph and write about the caveats; very, very helpful and it's really very much appreciated.

-Jon
 

Trekker

Trekker
Thanks for the write-up, Kat. Every time I begin to entertain thoughts of changing my own fuel filter, I get slapped back to reality when I read horror stories of what COULD go wrong. :bash:

Wow, with all that potential to mess up, it just doesn't seem worth the effort. And now you say that there is a possibility that I have to call MacGyver or get it towed to the dealer if I mess up? Wouldn't that sort of negate any cost savings of DIY?? No thanks. This job is better left to the pros, methinks. As Clint Eastwood said, "A man's got to know his limitations."

I used to run an electron microscope in my chem lab at work. That seems less daunting than changing a fuel filter on a sprinter. :bounce:
 

Kat

Katmobile
Thanks for the write-up, Kat. Every time I begin to entertain thoughts of changing my own fuel filter, I get slapped back to reality when I read horror stories of what COULD go wrong. :bash:

Wow, with all that potential to mess up, it just doesn't seem worth the effort. And now you say that there is a possibility that I have to call MacGyver or get it towed to the dealer if I mess up? Wouldn't that sort of negate any cost savings of DIY?? No thanks. This job is better left to the pros, methinks. As Clint Eastwood said, "A man's got to know his limitations."

I used to run an electron microscope in my chem lab at work. That seems less daunting than changing a fuel filter on a sprinter. :bounce:
It really wasn't that bad. The worst part was not knowing the correct method for removing the WIF sensor connection and then breaking it. But now that we know the white clip needs to be pushed IN (and you don't dare pry at the black tabs) while pulling up on the connector, the job should be much easier. Now that I know what to do, I won't hesitate to change my own fuel filter from now on. I'm pretty sure I could do it in 1/2 hr or less.

Although I'm sure that my MacGuyver fix for the WIF sensor would work, I don't like the way it looks. It does look funky, so I'm going to try to fashion a fastening holding mechanism out of stainless steel wire.

Kat
 

Kat

Katmobile
Yesterday I got replacement bolts to connect the WIF sensor to the fuel filter (I lost one of the originals) and today I fashioned a different MacGyver fix for my broken WIF hose connector, so I was able to put everything back together. So I figured that I might as well take photos of the re-installation. If you are interested in seeing my MacGyver fix for the broken WIF hose connector, here's the link: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?p=202325#post202325

So picking up where I left off...

Once you have inserted the new WIF connector into the fuel filter you can re-install the torx head screws that keep the sensor attached to the filter.

Then put the fuel filter back into the engine compartment and tighten the bolt on the filter clamp with a 5 mm hex head wrench.

Then attach fuel lines using the appropriate high pressure fuel line hose clamps and tighten their bolts.

Reattach electrical connectors and push the white tabs back in.

Put the WIF hose connector back into the WIF sensor. Since I broke the tabs off of mine, I'm not sure if you need to push in on the white clip or not while pushing down. All I can say here is to be careful with it since the 2 black tabs are very delicate. (If you broke yours, you will either need to do a MacGyver fix or buy a replacement hose from the dealer... good luck with that!).

Next, put the intake hose to the compressor housing of turbo back on and tighten the clamp. (There is a raised black arrow on the hose that lines up with a mark on the housing to get it into the right position).

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Reinstall the flat bracket using the 2 longer E 10 bolts (it's easier to put the hose back into the hose clip before bolting it down).

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Attach the square black box to the flat metal bracket using the shorter E 10 bolts.

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Now you need to reinstall the air filter. You need to fit the 2 plastic brackets on the back of the air filter over the black rubber cylinders. I found it easiest to hook the left side on first and then the right, because you also need to push in on the air intake hose (on the right) a little to get it into the engine compartment. (This view is from the driver's side)

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This is what the back of the filter looks like when it's installed (the view is from the passenger side).

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(continued...)
 

Kat

Katmobile
Make sure that the front pegs on the arms at the front of the air filter are aligned with the rubber grommets, and push down to insert them.

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Now they are connected.

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The air filter intake should also be sitting in the hole it fits into. Press the hose into the fitting until it connects to the fitting. You should hear it click when it connects.

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Now connect the hose from the turbo housing to the left side of the air filter and tighten the bolt on the clamp.

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You are not done yet.... You should make sure that the fuel filter is properly primed and that there aren't any leaks.

As I said earlier, I put diesel fuel from my old filter into the new filter (drained it into a clean glass jar first). But make sure that the top of your old filter is clean before you transfer any fuel. While I have read that this isn't absolutely necessary, it might make priming the filter easier...

I know that when I released one of the fuel lines during the initial disassembly, it looked as though some of the fuel drained back into the line, so I wanted to make sure that the pump was primed correctly.

So I did what Sikwan said he did in his post. See post #4 on this thread: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2318&highlight=prime+fuel+pump (Thanks Seek!).

I went through the process of turning the key to the on position (position #2 with no engine start) and I let it sit there for 40 seconds. I listened under the hood and it sounded like the fuel was being pumped into the fuel filter. But I went ahead and repeated the procedure 4 more times just to be sure. My van started up without any problems.

Then while the van was running, I looked at the filter and under the van to make sure that there were no leaks.... No leaks! Yea!

Next I wanted to reset the ASSYST so that the wrench icon would go away and that the computer would remind me of the next maintenance in another 10,000 mi or 2 years (I also just changed my oil, air filter, and will have the brake fluid replaced next week). I followed the instructions that Bikergar posted on post #1 of the thread below. The instructions are for vans without the steering wheel buttons, so if you have them you will probably need different instructions. The instructions say:

1. Put the key in the ignition and switch it on without starting the engine.
2. The ASSYST mileage will show, when the mileage shown returns to the vehicle mileage, hold the O button down till you hear a beep (could take a while)
3. As soon as you hear the beep, press the M button repeatedly and a number of reset menus will appear. Select "reset 51" (don't know what the other reset menus are for)
4. At reset 51 press the O button until a number 2 appears, release the O button, then press it twice and the LCD should show "display reset done"


I didn't have any problems following the instructions and it looks like the ASSYST did reset. (Thanks Bikergar!) Here is the link: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8113

I realize that all of this may sound complicated, but it really isn't hard at all. I probably included more information and details than were necessary, but I'd personally rather have more information than not enough...

I am So thankful for all of the information provided here at the forum and for all of the help I have received. :bow::bow::bow:

Good luck!

Kat
 
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danski0224

Active member
I have found out on my 2008, that the WIF connector with the white tabs does not need to be removed from the larger black piece that is held to the fuel filter with 2 screws.

There is *just enough* fuel line to pull the whole piece up and off of the fuel filter (an extra 1/2" or so of slack would have been nice).

Maybe the same would work on the 2012 model.
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
<snip>
You need a size E 10 socket or wrench (socket is easier) to remove the 2 bolts that secure the square black box (I have no idea what this is!). <snip>
That's your glow plug control module.


-Jon
 

kmessinger

Active member
They sure made this more complicated than the 2008.

Keith
 

Kat

Katmobile
I have found out on my 2008, that the WIF connector with the white tabs does not need to be removed from the larger black piece that is held to the fuel filter with 2 screws.

There is *just enough* fuel line to pull the whole piece up and off of the fuel filter (an extra 1/2" or so of slack would have been nice).

Maybe the same would work on the 2012 model.
I don't know where the fuel filter sits on a 2008 model, but on the 2010, but it is nestled down in and surrounded by the engine components. The question would be whether there is room to slip 2 screwdrivers between the top of the sensor and fuel filter to be able to pry it out. However, if there was a tool that worked similar to a plumber's faucet puller, you wouldn't need much room on the sides. But I don't know if the hose is long enough either.

I've got my van back together and running now :bounce: so I don't want to take it apart again until I have to. But if someone wants to give this a try on the 2010 model, I'd like to know what they used to get the WIF sensor out and if the hose is long enough.

But if you are lucky enough to have a model where there is enough room to work to get whole WIF sensor and hose connector out as one piece, that might be the way to go.

Kat
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
...my tongue is killing me....
Maybe Buster will kiss it and make it better.


I don't know where the fuel filter sits on a 2008 model, but on the 2010, but it is nestled down in and surrounded by the engine components. <snip>

Kat
2007, 2008 and 2009 US/Canadian diesel powered Sprinters all have the filter in the same place:

https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3652

The location is the same. The engines are different, though. 2007-2009: OM642.993 and 2010 to current: OM642.898

That's part of the fuel filter difference too....

Daimler Vans of North America ordered fuel filter pre-heaters, I think, as a "standard" for OM642.898 engines in the US and Canada; whereas DaimlerChrysler Vans of North America ordered OM642.993 w/o fuel filter heaters; don't even think they made the option available to us.

-Jon
 

bkhi

New member
I have a 2011, and I just finished changing the fuel filter. This info helped greatly. Next time will be very quick.

I did not have problem with WIF connector as much as other electrical connectors, moved gray tab out> clicked> still could not remove connector easily, I just removed screw holding bracket to left of filter and spun it out of the way.

If I could have figured out how to remove connectors on rear turbo hose I would just remove the entire thing rather than twist it back.

There has got to be a secret to removing the piece that sits right on the filter, that's a bear to remove. 4 or 5 O rings have to be unseated.
Getting it on the new filter was easy just twist back and forth while pushing.

I also filled new filter before installing which was not necessary, when key is in position 2 you can hear fuel pump filling filter. In my Isuzu and Fuso you had to hand prime, 150-200 times.

I could not find my 5mm allen wrench so my 3/16 was close enough

Really not too bad
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
<snip>
There has got to be a secret to removing the piece that sits right on the filter, that's a bear to remove. <snip>


It's not a secret. You push the white tabs, forcing the black claws away and you use a plastic pry tool to pop it off.

-Jon
 

bkhi

New member
Not the electrical connector, the sensor itself was a pain to remove
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Not the electrical connector, the sensor itself was a pain to remove
I was talking about the WIF drain connector.

2010+ models are the only ones in the US and Canada with the electrical connector.

I pry up the WIF sensor too.

-Jon
 

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