What did you do to your Sprinter today.

D

Deleted member 86082

Guest
Wow! Your awning is holding on really good, even upside down it doesn't fall off. :smirk:

-Randy
I know!!
A case of beer to the person who can figure out why my pic's are always up side down:thinking:

Btw, if you right click the image and click view image, it comes out right side up.
 
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Bob Laps

Member
Handsome dog! What's Choppers name? I bet protective and certainly wouldn't want to tangled with him.
Thanks Bob...his name is Bo because he was rescued from a Bo-Jangles (fast food joint in the SE)...looks are deceiving...he's the biggest baby ever. Maybe if my wife or I were getting attacked he would get aggressive but luckily that hasnt happened.... He basically thinks every human on earth is here to play with him!

Bob
 
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elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
A case of beer to the person who can figure out why my pic's are always up side down
Chances are good that you are holding your device upside down from its "standard" orientation when you take picture, especially if you are using a mobile phone and not a camera. That, coupled with inconsistencies in how different software processes digital photos can lead to the results that you are seeing. If you are not holding it upside down, the software that you are using may be introducing the problem.

A digital photo is data stored in a file. There is a standard way of reading that data and displaying the image oriented as it was stored. Digital photos can also have metadata that adds things like date/time information, camera settings, descriptions, etc (EXIF metadata). One of the pieces of metadata is an orientation tag. The orientation tag can specify that the picture should be displayed "rotated" from how it is stored in the file. Newer cameras and mobile devices typically have an orientation sensor and use this to set the EXIF orientation tag. A device that doesn't have such a sensor will store the image from the point of view of the device without regard to the devices orientation; if it adds an orientation tag the tag will indicate no rotation is required (even if it is).

There are inconsistencies in how devices/software handle the tag. For example, if you take a picture with a camera that is physically rotated (from its standard orientation), the camera might store the image in the file without regard to orientation (i.e, the "default" view would show a rotated picture), but add the orientation tag to indicate that the picture should be rotated to its correct orientation when viewed (soft rotate). However, if you view a picture where the orientation tag specifies the image should be rotated upon display, but the software that you are using doesn't interpret the orientation tag, it will be oriented incorrectly because the software simply reproduces the picture as stored in the file.

It gets worse. If you use that same software (that doesn't handle the EXIF orientation tag) to correct the orientation, it will probably change how the data is stored in the file (hard rotate), but not update the orientation tag. If you next view the image using software that DOES interpret the orientation tag, that software will rotate the image from its default orientation, which will make it appear incorrect (despite the fact that you thought you had fixed it). [Soft rotate is generally preferred to hard rotate, because hard rotate can cause a recompression of digital data that reduces image quality. This is one of the reasons why the orientation tag is used instead of just flipping the bits around in the file all of the time.]

So... you will need to do some sleuthing. What is the "standard" orientation for your device? How does your device store the data - does it store the picture in the data file as if the device were not rotated but add an orientation tag? How do you extract photos from your device - some import software will rotate on import if there are orientation tags, some won't. What software do you use to process your pictures? Is this software "aware" of orientation tags and updates them if you use the software to rotate your picture? Here is some technical information on digital picture orientation handling. You can find more using Google using search terms like "EXIF orientation" or "digital photo orientation".
 

elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
So... you will need to do some sleuthing. What is the "standard" orientation for your device? How does your device store the data - does it store the picture in the data file as if the device were not rotated but add an orientation tag? How do you extract photos from your device - some import software will rotate on import if there are orientation tags, some won't. What software do you use to process your pictures? Is this software "aware" of orientation tags and updates them if you use the software to rotate your picture? Here is some technical information on digital picture orientation handling. You can find more using Google using search terms like "EXIF orientation" or "digital photo orientation".
Since the above may not have been enough to earn the case of beer, I took a look at one of your images - "Awning 4.JPG". The EXIF data says that your iPhone 6s was being held upside down from its "default" orientation, and it has an orientation tag that specifies 180 degree rotation (Orientation "3") so that the pictures will display correctly when viewed by software that is "aware" of and properly handles the orientation tag. (Incidentally, your image also has all of its original GPS location information showing you were standing on the south side of E Esplanade in Vancouver at 4:37 pm on March 20th when you took the picture. In this case, not such a big deal, because the image itself shows a street sign that could be used to locate it. But if you have pictures taken other places, like your home, you might not want to include that GPS location when you put pictures up on the Internet.)

I haven't investigated how the forum is transmitting the images, but it seems probable that the orientation tag is not being used to rotate the image for initial display (i.e., doesn't support "soft rotate") so images must have a "hard rotate" in order for the initial display to appear correct).

I'll take Central City Red Racer IPA, thanks.
 
D

Deleted member 86082

Guest
Since the above may not have been enough to earn the case of beer, I took a look at one of your images - "Awning 4.JPG". The EXIF data says that your iPhone 6s was being held upside down from its "default" orientation, and it has an orientation tag that specifies 180 degree rotation (Orientation "3") so that the pictures will display correctly when viewed by software that is "aware" of and properly handles the orientation tag. (Incidentally, your image also has all of its original GPS location information showing you were standing on the south side of E Esplanade in Vancouver at 4:37 pm on March 20th when you took the picture. In this case, not such a big deal, because the image itself shows a street sign that could be used to locate it. But if you have pictures taken other places, like your home, you might not want to include that GPS location when you put pictures up on the Internet.)

I haven't investigated how the forum is transmitting the images, but it seems probable that the orientation tag is not being used to rotate the image for initial display (i.e., doesn't support "soft rotate") so images must have a "hard rotate" in order for the initial display to appear correct).

I'll take Central City Red Racer IPA, thanks.
Wow!! That is alot of info that I clearly didn't know about. Thanks!!
I do owe you the case of beer!!
 

israndy

2007 LTV Serenity
A hard rotate on the Mac can be completed by opening in Preview and clicking the rotate
Screen Shot 2019-03-23 at 7.05.11 AM.png
icon. You can even do this just by highlighting the photo in Finder taping the spacebar to open Quickview and hitting the same icon.

On the iPhone when you go to edit the photo just hit the crop
IMG_A02E272BA65B-1.jpeg Screen Shot 2019-03-23 at 7.13.59 AM.png
icon, and then the rotate icon.

Since you are trying to override what appears to be the correct orientation already but is actually a SOFT orientation you need to rotate the image 90° four times to save that as the new HARD orientation.

-Randy
 

elemental

Wherever you go, there you are.
Or just hold the phone the other way when you take pics
The standard orientation for Apple i-devices is for the home button to be on the right, not the left. My wife, who is left-handed, typically rotates hers so that the home button is on the left. Usually doesn't have any consequences, but with photos it does.

Avoiding hard rotations during processing by holding the phone in the expected orientation avoids another lossy JPG compression pass on the image that was reproduced from a previous lossy JPG compression pass. The quality loss may not be significant for you in casual use.

If it isn't always possible for you to hold the iPhone with the "correct" orientation and you are using a Windows computer to process your photos, this tool may be useful: JPEG Autorotate.
 

israndy

2007 LTV Serenity
Avoiding hard rotations during processing by holding the phone in the expected orientation avoids another lossy JPG compression pass on the image.
Does it? Or does it just rewrite the meta-data when you change the hard orientation?

-Randy
 

az7000'

Active member
Washed and full hand polish with Nu Finish after 1000 miles to Baja and back. 200 on the infamous hwy 5 poop show to Gonzaga! Pulling a 12' enclosed too.
 

CJPJ

2008 3500 170"ext. 3.0 V6 OM642.993
maintained image

 
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BrennWagon

He’s just this guy, you know?
I rolled Herculiner on the Brennwagon today. Trying to minimize the need for seasonal rust treatments. I think running boards are next up. I’ve got them mostly welded together, fabed some brackets from measurements I found on the forum
 

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Got a new air compressor after the old one crapped out yesterday! Gotta love warranties thank goodness and upgraded to boot too! 2014 2500 144 I4

I still love my Sprinter [emoji7]



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

Mickyfin

Member
Removed my front mud flaps, inner plastic wheel liner removed made things easier. There's some rust I need to treat tomorrow, I've also removed all my side panels, and cleaned everything up ready for fitting new clips, ensuring they are all water tight.

Untitled by S STEEL, on Flickr

Untitled by S STEEL, on Flickr

Untitled by S STEEL, on Flickr

Untitled by S STEEL, on Flickr

Its forecast rain overnight, so I taped up all the holes. Tomorrow I will use isopropyl to clean everything a final time, including the remains of what the gaffer tape will leave. Will be sanding all the lower body sections, and painting in bed liner.

My OEM alloys are at the powder coaters, and should be ready next week all being well. BFGoodrich K02's will be fitted to these too.
 

Mickyfin

Member
Got a new air compressor after the old one crapped out yesterday! Gotta love warranties thank goodness and upgraded to boot too! 2014 2500 144 I4

I still love my Sprinter [emoji7]



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Whats that thing on your sliding door towards the rear.?

I was surprised to find when I removed my lower trim panels, those with the kerb lights, they are normal bulbs, and not led's.

Has anyone replaced these side markers bulbs with led's without any issues with the ECU etc?
 
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