Using 80/20

GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
I just got 1” – 25mm corner connectors form McMaster and digested its label written in German and English, cost was $10.65. https://www.mcmaster.com/47065T244/

After some searching it is most likely made by Rexroth by Bosch - würfelverbinder 25 rexroth

https://docs.rs-online.com/3616/0900766b816ca108.pdf

https://www.boschrexroth.com/en/us/products/product-groups/assembly-technology/index

80/20 similar corner connector is $17.85, lower grade finish and without caps. Both are aluminum casts not Zn. https://8020.net/4042.html
 

jmole

Active member
I was concerned about the cabinet bottoms not ending up level. The wall has about an 8.5 degree slope where the plus nuts would be mounted, and of course the bolt will have to enter at an 8.5 degree angle as well.
The method I used works because the T-nut inside the slot of the 80/20 (behind the headliner) has the ability to absorb that angle. That's not to say your method won't work, but that was my thought.

In fact I was planning to mount mine the way you described, but ended up copying @GeorgeRa because I believe he had similar concerns.
You likely could, ½ profile maintains common plane for all PVC shims. Drilling holes in the headliner is a little more forgiving in horizontal dimension with a slot vs a hole. But there are many ways to do it.
Here's my solution, I 3D printed some parts out of PETG that tie in to the sidewalls and give me the right angle for mounting the 80/20 to the van. I've also printed a template for the rivnut holes and a template for cutting holes into the headliner. I'm using the headliner tab holes as a spatial reference for the templates to make things easy and consistent.

I may end up switching to nylon for the parts once I have everything dialed in.6F4595BE-2D6C-4335-BAD8-CE19992B4376_1_105_c.jpeg
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99sport

Well-known member
Here is my solution to mount to the wall at an angle - door hinges. Pictures tell the story. Microwave / toaster oven cabinet weighs 16lbs including the plywood floor.

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99sport

Well-known member
For the ceiling did you just cut spacers at an angle?
No. It's a very slight angle (didn't bother to measure). I assume the slight angle is taken up in the 1050 (1"x1/2") 80/20 which is not terribly stiff in torsion given its small cross sectional size.

(The stiff frame was not mounted directly to the roof rail - rather the 1050 was mounted to the roof and the very stiff cabinet mounted to that. The 1050 twists as needed to make everything align. Again - this is one or two degrees we are talking about.)

Okay, you got me curious so I just measured the angle. Looks like it is about 2.5 degrees. In this picture you can see how I mounted the shower structure to the roof rail - that structure IS stiff, so I did need to take out the angle at that attachment.

Never considered grinding the spacer as the head of the screw would then not be clamping on a parallel surface - only on one side / edge. Or the screw would be going into the rivnut at an angle depending on which side of the spacer you ground. I prefer to get full preload / clamping on every fastener and take out the rotation elsewhere. However, an alternative would be an angled spacer (with the angle on the rivnut side) AND a self aligning / angle tolerant rivnut (McMaster sells them).

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99sport

Well-known member
No. It's a very slight angle (didn't bother to measure). I assume the slight angle is taken up in the 1050 (1"x1/2") 80/20 which is not terribly stiff in torsion given its small cross sectional size.

(The stiff frame was not mounted directly to the roof rail - rather the 1050 was mounted to the roof and the very stiff cabinet mounted to that. The 1050 twists as needed to make everything align. Again - this is one or two degrees we are talking about.)

Okay, you got me curious so I just measured the angle. Looks like it is about 2.5 degrees. In this picture you can see how I mounted the shower structure to the roof rail - that structure IS stiff, so I did need to take out the angle at that attachment.

Never considered grinding the spacer as the head of the screw would then not be clamping on a parallel surface - only on one side / edge. Or the screw would be going into the rivnut at an angle depending on which side of the spacer you ground. I prefer to get full preload / clamping on every fastener and take out the rotation elsewhere. However, an alternative would be an angled spacer (with the angle on the rivnut side) AND a self aligning / angle tolerant rivnut (McMaster sells them).

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Just did the hand calc. If the 1050 profile is twisted 2.7 degrees over a distance of greater than 3" the stress in the 8020 is below its yield strength.
 

CaptureAwe

New member
Anyone know of a free, or reasonably priced design tool to use with 8020 to plan out and order that works with MAC/Apple

The 8020.net tool seem to only be for PC
 

Git

Active member
Looking for hinge suggestions to mount 1/2 birch ply to 10 series 80/20 for benches. Trying to have the ply be flush, recessed in the frame. There are two layers of ply in the pictures to raise the ply flush with the top, but only one will be used.
 

Attachments

GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
Looking for hinge suggestions to mount 1/2 birch ply to 10 series 80/20 for benches. Trying to have the ply be flush, recessed in the frame. There are two layers of ply in the pictures to raise the ply flush with the top, but only one will be used.
For my 2 leaves table I was looking for low profile and used military style aluminum piano hinge, very expensive. You could use plastic hinge. See many options on this site. https://www.mcmaster.com/piano-hinges/mil-spec-piano-hinges-without-holes/material~aluminum/

Having panels flush with the frame is a tough call in 8020.

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brownvan

2017 4X4 HR 144"
Also checkout "weld hinges" https://www.mcmaster.com/hinges/mount-type~weld-on/material~aluminum/
you might find a size you can work with for your design where you can place the mounting holes to suit your geometry
I used these in order to get my cabinet doors to sit flush with 40-series extrusions (when closed), one leaf is attached to the vertical t-slot and the other to the edge of the door. The edge of the door had a machined relief for the leaf-stackup and screws went into the edge of the door. One of the leafs was trimmed to match the 12 mm thickness of the door.
I used stainless but would recommend aluminum since it's easier to work with. There are Euro hinges that may work too but I gave up looking for the right euro hinge for my application.
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MS42

2014 Freightliner 3500
For my 2 leaves table I was looking for low profile and used military style aluminum piano hinge, very expensive. You could use plastic hinge. See many options on this site. https://www.mcmaster.com/piano-hinges/mil-spec-piano-hinges-without-holes/material~aluminum/

Having panels flush with the frame is a tough call in 8020.

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What are those clamps you show in the third photo? Looks like a speed clamp of some sort.
 

RVBarry

Well-known member
Hi,
Anyone know the strength (pull-out) ratings for the different types of 80/20 T-nuts?

e.g. a 'Standard' 3204 vs an 'Economy' 3382?

Also, is corrosion risk greater on the thinner economy nuts?

Thanks!
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Hi,
Anyone know the strength (pull-out) ratings for the different types of 80/20 T-nuts?

e.g. a 'Standard' 3204 vs an 'Economy' 3382?

Also, is corrosion risk greater on the thinner economy nuts?

Thanks!
The 3204 has a thread depth of 0.171in vs 0.124in for the 3382.

Assuming they are made of the same steel alloy, the larger thread depth = stronger pull out.
 

RVBarry

Well-known member
Thanks...
I'm designing a roof rack for solar panels, and wondering if the Standards are overkill.

For interior cabinets with batteries, water, etc., the standard ones seem prudent.
 

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