Using 80/20

akadventurecpl

New member
One method of thermally isolating a 80/20 structure from the van steel:

https://www.boellhoff.com/us-en/products-and-services/special-fasteners/decoupling-rivnut-av.php

Aluminum is a very good conductor. When the extrusions are directly bolted to the van steel the aluminum gets close to the temperature of the steel van body.
What are thoughts about using sill seal (polyethylene foam gasketing strips) like used on a building foundation to isolate the 80/20?
 

GSWatson

2013 144
I’m not entirely convinced it makes that much of a difference, though others may differ. I think any metal just feels colder in general, especially in colder temperatures. It’s one reason why I like the all wood interior of my van, though the van I’m converting right now is using 8020 as the cabinetry framework.


Cheers,
Greg
 

Gski

Member
What are thoughts about using sill seal (polyethylene foam gasketing strips) like used on a building foundation to isolate the 80/20?
That would definitely make a difference.

Aluminum is the fourth most conductive (common) metal, scoring 237W/m.K, compared to 54W/m.K for carbon steel and under 40 for stainless steels.

For comparison, polyurethane is 0.02W/m.K and wood tops out at 0.1. Virtually all rubber and plastic materials will score under 1W/m.K.

Even a strip of electrical tape between the parts will make a noticeable difference. Because you have a steel bolt connecting the two parts, you don’t need perfect insulation, just a reduction in connection area.

I am currently looking for insulating material myself, as my build starts next week. I am looking for something that is 1mm to 2mm thick, and is very stiff so the parts don’t have enough freedom to loosen the bolt by vibration.

I plan to walk the aisles of my hardware store to find a stiffer gasket material than the sill seal mentioned, starting in the weather stripping section.
 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
Even a strip of electrical tape between the parts will make a noticeable difference. Because you have a steel bolt connecting the two parts, you don’t need perfect insulation, just a reduction in connection area.

I am currently looking for insulating material myself, as my build starts next week. I am looking for something that is 1mm to 2mm thick, and is very stiff so the parts don’t have enough freedom to loosen the bolt by vibration.
I also insulated the bolt heads from the angle extrusion with plastic spacers. One spacer between the extrusion and van steel and one spacer between the bolt head and the extrusion.

Spacer source: https://product-components.com/plastic-spacers-standoffs/plastic-spacers/spacers

Used 1/2" plywood between roof rib and extrusion to hang top overhead cabinet extrusion from the rib. Angle on rib to plywood with plywood bolted to extrusion. Cabinet bottom is 1/2" plywood bolted to lower extrusion on one end and to the wall at the other.
 

akadventurecpl

New member
I have not found any reference to how best to make a 5/16" tap on the end of the smooth profiles with the x shaped center ... the 5/16" tap bit just wants to bind when I attempt it. Any advice?
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
I have not found any reference to how best to make a 5/16" tap on the end of the smooth profiles with the x shaped center ... the 5/16" tap bit just wants to bind when I attempt it. Any advice?
Make jig with a 5/16" threaded hole to clamp to the t-slot that will position and hold the tap on centre while entering the t-slot x-hole.
 

akadventurecpl

New member
Sorry for the delay in sending thanks, but was on a trip from Eagle River, AK to Whitehorse, Yukon with what was a modified 8020 bed somewhat in the style of Geek's bed system. The ALCAN has got to be one of the bumpiest paved roads (at least in North America) and not a single sound from the bed once I had everything assembled and tightened. This 8020 material is really very nice (albeit pricey), but unfortunately I'm not as good at thinking several moves ahead and sometimes find myself having to back up a bit ... the classic three steps forward, two back, and then forward again. With all of your help I am now going to be disassembling, modifying and reassembling to use the other 8020 I had wanted to use in the first place along with making the overhead cabinets. Again many thanks.
 

GSWatson

2013 144
I’ve found a nice way to secure 1/2” panels to 15 series. I’m using bamboo plywood, and using the 1/2” for some of the side panels that I’m attaching other things to, usually screwing on things on the inside.

This puts the 1/2” panel ever so slightly inset from the outside of the 80/20.

I cut some 1/4” ply in 1.5” strips, and beveled one edge -


Then, I inserted some foam caulk rod into the channel of the 80/20. I used the type labeled for small for small gaps.

I then wedged in the 1/4” ply strips so that the foam rod was on the side of the gap away from the panel, and the ply strips were angled into the cabinet.



I then put in the 1/2” panel, and screwed the 1/4” ply to the 1/2 panel with 3/4” truss head screws. You could use pan heads as well; the truss heads didn’t protrude. I was going to get pan heads later, but went with the truss heads on hand.



The end result is a panel that is held in very securely, doesn’t rattle, and is easily removed for access/refinishing/etc. One could glue the 1/4” ply to the 1/2” if you wanted something more permanent.






Cheers,
Greg
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
I’ve found a nice way to secure 1/2” panels to 15 series. I’m using bamboo plywood, and using the 1/2” for some of the side panels that I’m attaching other things to, usually screwing on things on the inside.

This puts the 1/2” panel ever so slightly inset from the outside of the 80/20.

I cut some 1/4” ply in 1.5” strips, and beveled one edge -
Then, I inserted some foam caulk rod into the channel of the 80/20. I used the type labeled for small for small gaps.

I then wedged in the 1/4” ply strips so that the foam rod was on the side of the gap away from the panel, and the ply strips were angled into the cabinet.


I then put in the 1/2” panel, and screwed the 1/4” ply to the 1/2 panel with 3/4” truss head screws. You could use pan heads as well; the truss heads didn’t protrude. I was going to get pan heads later, but went with the truss heads on hand.


The end result is a panel that is held in very securely, doesn’t rattle, and is easily removed for access/refinishing/etc. One could glue the 1/4” ply to the 1/2” if you wanted something more permanent.


Cheers,
Greg
This is a fabulous idea/method... one that I will 'bookmark' and use at some point. :thumbup:
 

DesertRat

Member
Has anyone figured out an elegant way of using a single t-slot for curtains? Ideally, I'd like to mount some t-slot and have rollers that I could attach the curtains to. The roller wheel assemblies that 8020 carries would be overkill, and I want something that would run inside the tslot. Anyone done this in the past?
 

Graphite Dave

Dave Orton
Has anyone figured out an elegant way of using a single t-slot for curtains? Ideally, I'd like to mount some t-slot and have rollers that I could attach the curtains to. The roller wheel assemblies that 8020 carries would be overkill, and I want something that would run inside the tslot. Anyone done this in the past?
Could you use the tool hanger part # 2100?

https://8020.net/2100.html
 

GSWatson

2013 144
I would suggest getting a plastic rod and cut it into chunks, screw hooks into that. Similar to George’s idea, but perhaps a little less expensive, and the rod would allow the curtain to swing back-and-forth a little bit and slide easier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

GeorgeRa

2013 Sprinter DIY 144WB, Portland OR
I would suggest getting a plastic rod and cut it into chunks, screw hooks into that. Similar to George’s idea, but perhaps a little less expensive, and the rod would allow the curtain to swing back-and-forth a little bit and slide easier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
....and to extend this chunk of rod concept just cut ¼” diameter rod to about 1" length and loop a fabric strip sewn to a curtain, it could bind.

I spent some time to evaluate the length of the 8020 PE profile to move smoothly, ended up to be one the best decision for the conversion.
 

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