NCV3 fuel tank removal

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
Seadawg's T1Ncan tank removal post prompted me to do this NCV3 version.

Before you start you need to decide whether you are likely to need to remove the tank completely or just dropping it to the floor. Unlike the T1Ncan the NCV3's fuel filler neck is permanently fixed to the tank itself, so if planning on removal of tank you'll need to drive the van up onto some blocks in order to achieve the necessary clearance underneath to extricate the tank and filler neck. I'd recommend you do this anyway just for extra working headroom.

Next thing is to open the fuel filler flap and remove it. Then remove the black trim piece that surrounds the top of the filler neck revealing a single retaining machine screw on a flange around the filler opening - undo that, taking care not to drop it down the filler neck.

Moving underneath the van now, you need to arrange a jack and board to take the weight of the tank before undoing the three retaining straps (x6 torx). Unless you have a virtually empty tank you'll find it bulges when you drop the straps off, making it trickier to refit.

To the rear of the tank there is a large breather hose connected to a few plastic turn pieces. Disconnect those taking care not to lose the one that vents into the chassis rail.

Where the fuel filler neck turns up there are a couple of polystyrene inserts to remove and a single earth wire to unclip.

Now observe the flow and return fuel lines where they run from the front of the tank towards the engine. Look for the two quick disconnect fittings, identifiable on mine by blue and grey plastic inserts. They're fairly obvious. Lower the tank a small amount then disconnect the hard fuel lines by sliding the inserts out of the fittings: i.e. push the coloured plastic part to the side. Once disconnected the inserts are retained. Lowering the tank a little makes it easier to then pull the hard lines apart. The fittings are deceptively simple to unclip / clip once you see how they work.

The tank is now ready to lower down.

The fuel sender locking ring is a different size to the T1Ncan, if you need to get it off you'll manage it with some careful drifting with a non-too sharp tool (caution doing this in the obvious place - the tabs break off very easily).

The sender itself comes out without any trouble. My reason for taking the tank off was to install a dedicated standpipe for auxiliary heat, and you can see two places in the top of the tank where provision exists for this - one flat point at the very front and another flat point about midway along (you can see empty runs moulded into the tank designed for auxiliary fuel lines). I chose the midway flat as I could just reach inside to catch the swarf from hole cutting.

If you're wondering why I went to all this trouble... on my Euro5 2010 there is an additional unused outlet on top of the sender which teases you into thinking you might be able to just drill it open for a feed. It's just a cruel joke I'm afraid - there's no standpipe underneath it into the fuel, it just vents into the swirl pot.

With a warranty to protect for now I wasn't prepared to cut a factory fuel line (hmmm, actually I wouldn't have done that "warranty" or "not") so I was forced to install a dedicated standpipe. In the end it was no more work than if I had just done it in the first place instead of messing around trying to get the fuel through the imposter outlet on the sender.

First time you do it allow a couple of hours, reduce to fifteen minutes with practice!
 
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damien89

Member
Thanks for the thread! Could it be possible that you put some pics in if you have any?

If i may ask, did you have a reason to take out the fuel tank?
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Next thing is to open the fuel filler flap and remove it. Then remove the black trim piece that surrounds the top of the filler neck revealing a single retaining machine screw on a flange around the filler opening - undo that, taking care not to drop it down the filler neck.
I always survey a work area and cover (using a rag or some masking tape) any opening that might swallow a small part.

Excellent write up, Simon; one I hope I never have to refer to for the rest of my Sprinter's life.

-Jon
 

Diamondsea

New member
Don't the NCV3s already have a tap for auxiliary heat? My 2009 did so I did not need to add anything to the tank to install an Espar heater.
 

Chandlerazman

New member
...And here I got all excited thinking this thread dealt with the removal of stock tank for a new larger capacity unit :laughing:
I would love to get a thousand mile range prior to refueling.
Nice writeup Simon :thumbup:
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
Thanks.

Some do come with auxiliary outlet from the factory, and you can see in the tank moulding where it would be. Curiously no option for it exists in the UK order book.

You can have a one hundred litres tank though. I did!
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
All NAFTA NCV3s were ordered by Chrysler with the 100 liter tank; the 75 liter tank was not offered to us (just imagine the backlash - so many Americans think 25 gallons + change is barely, if that, sufficient).

-Jon
 

GregT

08 2500 170 Ext Crew
Thank you Simon. I am preparing to install a Webasto in my 2008 NC3 and your directions will make dropping the fuel tank much easier. Looking forward to having the heater in the van for our winter ski trips in the Rocky mountains.
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
My pleasure. You'll see the obvious flat in the plastic moulding to the rear of the factory sender.

Tip: if you screw the dosing pump bracket to a chassis box section it will be much less audible in operation compared to mounting it somewhere on the floorpan where it will resonate considerably. I ran the fuel line from my standpipe off the rear of the tank and put the pump on a chassis rail near the rear axle, then continued the line over to the other side of the vehicle and back up the other chassis rail. It then pops up into the cab underneath the rear seats. I can't hear the pump working at all from inside the cab.
 
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Thank you Simon. I am preparing to install a Webasto in my 2008 NC3 and your directions will make dropping the fuel tank much easier. Looking forward to having the heater in the van for our winter ski trips in the Rocky mountains.
Which one are you installing?
 

Bman18

New member
Thanks to this write up I got confident enough to take my own tank out and put in a dedicated stand pipe for my Webasto Airtop 2000ST. I have a basic 2007 311CDI with a 75L tank which didn´t have any extras, so there was no additional sender for a stand heater in place.

I haven´t anyting to add to Mean_in_Green´s description; it´s just plain excellent! :bow:
But I did take some pictures and although the quality is horrible (new phone I haddn´t tried yet) they might be of help to some.

Here you see the location I picked for the standpipe. I supose it´s the same as the location MiG mentions.
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/XHrXXPzdonA2SREzmZ-WUSp5QoUwubmnTc7O6IySYVo?feat=directlink

I put some regular fuel line over the tube supplied by Webasto trying to avoid that the tubing would break down over time due to repeated movement/vibrations.
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/q3GWNvhy9LW9jpiCWoNqdSp5QoUwubmnTc7O6IySYVo?feat=directlink

And I brought the line to the front of the tank as I will install the Webasto under the passanger seat.
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/2jLiqKKKNJepuC0OR3unMCp5QoUwubmnTc7O6IySYVo?feat=directlink

I´ll post some pics in a seperate post regarding my Webasto install.
A big thanks to MiG and all the others in this place. Without all of you I would make at least triple the amount of mistakes as I do now.........:thumbup:
 

GregT

08 2500 170 Ext Crew
I mounted my standpipe in the exact same location. The height of the top of the standpipe fuel tube needed the clearance that the location provided. There are several flat areas on top of the fuel tank that would work, if the standpipe was of a "low profile" design, unfortunately it is not.
 

kmessinger

New member
I mounted my standpipe in the exact same location. The height of the top of the standpipe fuel tube needed the clearance that the location provided. There are several flat areas on top of the fuel tank that would work, if the standpipe was of a "low profile" design, unfortunately it is not.
Curious why you didn't use the existing tap and not drop the tank?

Regards,

Keith
 

mean_in_green

>2,000,000m in MB vans
Do you mean "existing aux tap" Keith? If so it's not "Serie" in some markets. Mine doesn't have any other lines aside from flow / return to engine. A moulding indentation is visible on the tank where others clearly have the auxiliary tap.
 

kmessinger

New member
Do you mean "existing aux tap" Keith? If so it's not "Serie" in some markets. Mine doesn't have any other lines aside from flow / return to engine. A moulding indentation is visible on the tank where others clearly have the auxiliary tap.
Yes, the existing aux fuel tap. I thought in the NAFTA market, on 2008's, they were standard.

Keith
 

GregT

08 2500 170 Ext Crew
My first thought was to tap into my Aux heater fuel line but I decided I did not want to disturb the factory installed Aux Espar heater.
 

ReGULT51

New member
MiG - thanks for the write up. Just a few questio

- I'm going to use a floor jack to support the tank (has about 2.5 gal fuel). I'm only interested in lowering it to get access above the tank to the van floor.

How much clearance is there between the tank and floor?
How many inches can I lower the tank just by loosening/undoing the straps and not break anything fixed to the tank?
If not feasible, what do I have to remove/unsecure to get that 3-4 inches? Just the fuel flapper/filler, or the fuel lines as well?
I have a 2014, so I'm assuming things are fairly similar...

Thanks for your help!
 

Redskeets

New member
ReGULT1 - did you get an answer to your questions? I'm looking to do the same procedure of just lowering the tank and have the same questions u had. Thx
 

asimba2

2016 4cyl High Roof 144
How much clearance is there between the tank and floor?
How many inches can I lower the tank just by loosening/undoing the straps and not break anything fixed to the tank?
If not feasible, what do I have to remove/unsecure to get that 3-4 inches? Just the fuel flapper/filler, or the fuel lines as well?
I have a 2014, so I'm assuming things are fairly similar...

Thanks for your help!
Same questions...anyone know how much clearance there is between the fuel tank and bottom of the floor?

How far can the tank be safely lowered before needing to disconnect lines?
 

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