NAFTA NCV3 - Replacing the left charge air cooler hose

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jdcaples

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This write up is inspired by this thread: https://sprinter-source.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9996
The thread is full of "ideas," so it drifts around a bit.

For the inspiration of this specific write up, start at about posting number 21.

Here is a picture of the two parts, off vehicle:
New-Hose-Old-Hose.JPG

The newer, redesigned one is on the left. Carl said that the new design looks like a "J". Personally, I think it looks more like a question mark with the splat on the bottom (so I improvised with my camera lens cover).

One side has a classic, worm-gear clamp that attaches on the front side of the engine compartment (the charge air cooler). The charge air cooler has a nipple on it, about 2 inches in outside diameter (OD) with a hose-end single barb making the full circumference of the nipple. (Sorry, no pictures).

The other side inserts into a metal pipe. On this side, the hose adapter is locked into place with a funky hunk of bent metal wire that MB calls a "Spring Clamp." (Again, no picture off vehicle).

The clamp does not traverse the entire circumference of the mating joint. The hose end has a bump (nub) on each side of it. An analog opening on the engine side of the fitting has two holes through which the nubs protrude and may be locked into place by - you guessed it - the Spring Clamp. It probably covers about 190-210 degrees around the fitting (note, if geometry was too long ago, 360 degrees is all the way around and 180 is 1/2 way around).

The Spring Clamp is brass colored; the ends are bent at a 90 degree angle and when installed, the ends point towards the engine, not the hose. This is the area on the engine side of the hose, where the Spring Clamp sits after installation (poorly drawn in red using Microsoft Paint).

SpringClamp-Fits-here.jpg


Warning: Don't malform the Spring Clamp when you take it off. Be gentle.

If you're like me and you don't know for a fact how to get the Spring Clamp off correctly, you can use a flat screw driver or a pair of needle nose pliers to apply a modest amount of tension - in the protrusion of the clamp (away from the fitting) - to help coax the Spring Clamp away from the hose end fitting.

Simultaneously, use a free finger to grab the edge of the Spring Clamp (the end bit that points "up") and pull the end outwards from the fitting.

The Spring Clamp should release and you should be able to remove it w/o much effort.

Set the Spring Clamp down on the ground with the ends pointed up (to remind you that the ends need to point away from the hose and up towards the engine when you put the Spring Clamp back on).

Once the Spring Clamp is off, you may then turn your attention to the other side of the hose, with the traditional, worm-gear clamp.

Use an 8mm socket on a 1/4" driver to loosen it, then you're free. Don't think about the slot in the fastener and think "screw driver." That slot is a cruel joke, a red herring, a distraction at best.... unless of course all you have are standard, non metric sockets, but then why are you driving a Sprinter w/o a full set of metric sockets?

To install it, I put the worm-gear clamp side on first, but I did not tighten it down. I inserted the engine side next and fiddled with the Spring Clamp. Once I was pretty sure the hose was properly oriented on both sides, I tightened down the worm-gear clamp (8mm socket works better than a screw driver, in spite of the temptation to use a screw driver).

Here's the new hose installed.

SnapRing-And-Clamp.jpg


Now, here's the caveat.

Getting the Spring Clamp seated properly can be challenging if you've never done this before, like me.

You know it's done right when you can't scoot the clamp around the circumference of the fitting, or move it easily up and down.

You know it's done right if you can't easily pull the hose out of the engine side fitting. DO NOT TRY TO DRIVE YET.

You know it's wrong when you start the engine and - while parked - rev it to, say 2200 RPMs and you hear a big, low pitched "pop" followed by a "Whoosh" sound.

If this happens to you, stop the engine and re-seat the clamp, again, and again, and again, and again, and again.

Yeah, it took me 5 tries to get the Spring Clamp seated.

The last time, I heard a very positive "snap" into place.

After rev'ing the engine about 1/2 dozen times to be certain, I checked the front side of the hose again and took it for a test drive. Then I returned, hooked up StarMOBILE and was happy to learn that I didn't toss any codes.


Personal opinion: I don't think I needed to do this. I realize that other people - esp you crazy RVers with the heavy loads; or owners that make their home in hot, or dusty or dry environments - but really, if you live in Seattle, get the new hose, like I did, but wait until you need to install it.

-Jon
 
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talkinghorse43

Active member
On this side, the hose adapter is locked into place with a funky hunk of bent metal wire that MB calls a "Spring Clamp." (Again, no picture off vehicle).

The clamp does not traverse the entire circumference of the mating joint. The hose end has a bump (nub) on each side of it. An analog opening on the engine side of the fitting has two holes through which the nubs protrude and may be locked into place by - you guessed it - the Spring Clamp. It probably covers about 190-210 degrees around the fitting (note, if geometry was too long ago, 360 degrees is all the way around and 180 is 1/2 way around).

The Spring Clamp is brass colored; the ends are bent at a 90 degree angle and when installed, the ends point towards the engine, not the hose. This is the area on the engine side of the hose, where the Spring Clamp sits after installation (poorly drawn in red using Microsoft Paint).

View attachment 21817


Warning: Don't malform the Spring Clamp when you take it off. Be gentle.

If you're like me and you don't know for a fact how to get the Spring Clamp off correctly, you can use a flat screw driver or a pair of needle nose pliers to apply a modest amount of tension - in the protrusion of the clamp (away from the fitting) - to help coax the Spring Clamp away from the hose end fitting.

Simultaneously, use a free finger to grab the edge of the Spring Clamp (the end bit that points "up") and pull the end outwards from the fitting.

The Spring Clamp should release and you should be able to remove it w/o much effort.
Don't know for sure, but this looks a lot like the connection connecting the charge air hose to the EGR valve on my OM612. On my OM612, the spring clamp does not have to be removed to break/make that connection. I just use a screwdriver under the loop to lift the clamp a little to a opened position where a detent holds it in place. Once in the opened position, the connection can be broken/made. After inserting the charge air hose, I just push down on the loop and the spring clamp snaps back into the locked position.
 
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jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
You're probably right.

Thanks, talkinghorse43.

Not removing the locking mechanism makes much more sense than removing it and risking malformation of the piece.

I have a lot to learn.


-Jon

PS: then again, the locking mechanism is pretty much occluded by the flange of the receiving lumen. If I could have seen it from the top, instead of just feeling around with my finger tips, I might not have popped it off.

PPS: it would have also helped if someone had written it down on techauthority, the service manual cd or WIS.
 
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Chandlerazman

New member
Jon, thanks for the writeup. Although I live in a dry climate, having a new design to correct a flaw is still good insurance. What did the parts cost? By the way, your engine looks rather clean still!
 

OrioN

2008 2500 170" EXT
Sheila... oops, I mean Jon... do you know if at some point/when the updated hose made it to the assembly line?

Also, as per Sheila... oops, I mean Simon, what's cost? I'm still under warranty and perhaps I've got a REV'd, but you've got me thinking...

ps... it's night time and raining, so I'll look under the hood in the AM...


Thanks!!
 
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jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Jon, thanks for the writeup. Although I live in a dry climate, having a new design to correct a flaw is still good insurance. What did the parts cost? By the way, your engine looks rather clean still!
I don't remember the price. I bought it one or two years ago when an RVer told me they blew out all the time.

Naturally, I was terrified about being stranded in the middle of the desert.

A little retail therapy and suddenly, I was all "stop borrowing trouble from the future, Jon. Enjoy the ride."

OrioN, I don't know if the updated part made it into the assembly line or not; I'm not sure I care. Maybe I do, but does it impact me right now? No.


-Jon
 

kmessinger

Active member
Is the part number the same as the old hose?

Regards,

Keith
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
Can you subscribe to epc.startekinfo.com, fork over the $12 dollars for access to "world passenger car and light transport," input your VIN, review the Exhaust Group parts (charge air cooling) and see if there are two part numbers (one part number will be current, the other will be "replaced by...."?

It would help. I'm slammed right now.

-Jon
 

jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
This is for those that can't, for whatever reason, either pay a dollar a month for access to Sprinter parts on epc.startekinfo.com, or if you're stuck because Daimler, like Chrysler, doesn't really support non-microsoft computer systems very well.

MB Numbers for the hoses on the left (drivers side) of the NAFTA 906 Chassis

Old design: A 906 528 02 82
New design: A 906 528 22 82

Valid for vehicles coded with MC4/MP0

You can read which part number you have on the hose. Chrysler part numbers don't exist on my Sprinter as far as I've found, only MB part numbers.

If you have to order a hose from a Chrysler parts supplier, you can cross reference the MOPAR to MB part numbers at http://starparts.chrysler.com/home/crossref.htm

-Jon
 
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jdcaples

Not Suitable w/220v Gen
What's the next step towards migrating from the US to the UK?

I could use a pointer towards the forms required and a letter of employment intent.

Wait, my girlfriend overstayed her work-in-the-UK visa about 12 years ago and was asked to leave the UK; ok, she was deported.

Is that a permanent ban? I'm rather fond of her and would prefer to not abandon her; unless Alex Best (born Alexandra Pursey) is still single and interested in shacking up with an ex-pat yank..... then things are, um, negotiable.

-Jon
 
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