Off to Alaska

aksotar

2017 4x4 144 Cargo
Yakutat gets loads of snow every year but also Winter rains, I have no idea why the roofs in the pic have such a minimal pitch but I’m guessing the Guy shovelling does too !! 🤣🤣
 

tinman

Well-known member
Why a nearly flat roof in deep snow country though? Unless its a normally dry region?
Looks like it might have drifted, got deep on the lee side. In some of those coastal high snow regions leaving a building one winter without heat means crushed to matchwood. Steel roofs that even with a good pitch rely on interior heat transfer to shed the snow.
 

aksotar

2017 4x4 144 Cargo
Ahhhh... news to me, a roof that gets warm is not what I want.. I want a cold roof, no icicles or ice dams (that's a sign of poor insulation and/or VB) I've never heard of anybody here in Alaska that heats their roof to shed snow, the closest "roof heating" would be heat tape along the eaves to thaw/prevent ice build ups... imagine the ice build up on the ground along buildings if they cleared their roofs like that...
the snow seems pretty level so I don't think it was windy... I believe it's the Glacier Bear Lodge and it's shut down during the Winter so I doubt it's heated... the main and out buildings are probably winterized and just a Caretaker in a small cabin there like most fishing lodges in Ak are in the offseason.... you can see the high pitch roof shed snow and he's stuck shovelling the flatter roofed buildings...
steel roofs are nice because they are slick and allow snow to slide off easier...
 
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glasseye

Well-known member
That is an impressive wack of snow. I pity that guy even more than I pitied myself two days ago.


This year, BC has seen record cold, record heat, record drought and record precipitation.
 

tinman

Well-known member
Ahhhh... news to me, a roof that gets warm is not what I want.. I want a cold roof, no icicles or ice dams (that's a sign of poor insulation and/or VB) I've never heard of anybody here in Alaska that heats their roof to shed snow, the closest "roof heating" would be heat tape along the eaves to thaw/prevent ice build ups... imagine the ice build up on the ground along buildings if they cleared their roofs like that...
the snow seems pretty level so I don't think it was windy... I believe it's the Glacier Bear Lodge and it's shut down during the Winter so I doubt it's heated... the main and out buildings are probably winterized and just a Caretaker in a small cabin there like most fishing lodges in Ak are in the offseason.... you can see the high pitch roof shed snow and he's stuck shovelling the flatter roofed buildings...
steel roofs are nice because they are slick and allow snow to slide off easier...
Might be old "technology". I first ran into it in a mining camp early '70's. The temperatures were not normally extreme, but the snowfall was, as in 100' + some years. As I recall, the corregated steel roof pitch was a normal 1/3, and the escaping heat from the buildings was enough for the snow to slump off (and occasionally curl under and soak through the walls). When the place shut down for a couple of years, the snow took out the steeply sloped steel roof on the mill. Buildings at other abandoned camps in the area were flattened. The logistics of operating in that environment were, dare I say, challenging.
 

aksotar

2017 4x4 144 Cargo
100 feet or inches ??
I’ve been in Ak since 1/73 when the Army stationed me here and none of the buildings I’ve ever been in have used interior heat to shed snow from the roof… even the metal Quonset Huts the Military used here during WWII were insulated…
Kennicott Mine is standing after over 100 snowy Winters in McCarthy and it’s been unheated for decades…
where were you ? it sounds like the mining buildings there were built to “make do” vs last…

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