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Old 01-18-2020, 04:47 PM   #1
DariusB
 
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Default Chassis battery question

What should the reading in volts be for a FULLY CHARGED battery be on a 2019 Navion. Stock battery.
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Old 01-18-2020, 07:10 PM   #2
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=i&rct=j...79460868504912
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Old 01-18-2020, 07:12 PM   #3
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

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Originally Posted by DariusB View Post
What should the reading in volts be for a FULLY CHARGED battery be on a 2019 Navion. Stock battery.
About 14 volts when the engine is running, 12.6 or more 30 minutes after shutdown.
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Old 01-19-2020, 12:55 PM   #4
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

Just know that voltage is not a precise indicator. With a Starter batt maybe precision is not needed, but FYI
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Old 01-19-2020, 01:52 PM   #5
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

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Just know that voltage is not a precise indicator. With a Starter batt maybe precision is not needed, but FYI
I'd use the adjectives "approximately" or "about" when gauging the SoC of batteries. It depends a lot on the ambient and battery temperature. The ideal temperature is about 77F (25C). So, measuring a resting battery's SoC at 50F will give you a lower value.

Best thing is to turn the Master coach electrical on and go to your SoC meter and note the readings before you turn anything on. Then start the engine. SoC should rise when charge is applied indicating the system is working right. The SoC will be what it will be depending on how long you have charged the battery. Check again about 30-60 minutes after shut down. Remember it may take many hours to bring a battery up to full SoC.
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Old 01-19-2020, 02:10 PM   #6
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

If precision is needed, a reading of trailing current while finish-charging at Absorb voltage is canon for precise measure of 100%.

0.005C is the usual standard if the mfg spec is not found, aka 0.5 amp per 100Ah.

For some more sensitive chemistries, better to use a gentler 0.015C

Or if the batt is not healthy enough to get to an absolute endAmps, Deka'srelative spec of

Current change over 1 hour period of less than 0.1A

can be used.

For optimal longevity, this point should be reached by any charge source before dropping to Float.
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Old 01-19-2020, 04:12 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
If precision is needed, a reading of trailing current while finish-charging at Absorb voltage is canon for precise measure of 100%.

0.005C is the usual standard if the mfg spec is not found, aka 0.5 amp per 100Ah.

For some more sensitive chemistries, better to use a gentler 0.015C

Or if the batt is not healthy enough to get to an absolute endAmps, Deka'srelative spec of

Current change over 1 hour period of less than 0.1A

can be used.

For optimal longevity, this point should be reached by any charge source before dropping to Float.
Wow. I understand getting into the finer points with coach batteries, as they are (To my mind) more highly stressed than the chassis battery. But SOC on the chassis battery is as simple as it is with any car or truck battery. Most folks aren't going to get into modifying the system to make certain that they are charging the chassis battery to 99.99% rather than 98%. The vehicle is designed to do that all by itself, and it does it amazingly well.
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Old 01-19-2020, 11:03 PM   #8
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Default Re: Chassis battery question

Yes, I am not saying such precision is required for normal Starter use cases.

My initial heads' up was just that, in case OP did want precision in their case, and thought resting voltage would deliver that.
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