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Old 01-12-2018, 10:31 PM   #1
Aqua Puttana
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Default Commercial Bio-Fuel and Your Sprinter

B5, B-5, B20, B-20 bio-fuel, biofuel, bio fuel, bio-diesel, biodiesel, bio diesel

The concerns about bio-fuel come up here often. Using commercially available diesel fuel that is produced to ASTM standards will not automatically void your warranty and will certainly not immediately destroy your engine.

First.
Although the Operator Manual for your Sprinter does have legal status, the Operator Manual is the Cliff Notes for information.

I strongly encourage any owner concerned with bio-fuel use to read this Mercedes Biodiesel brochure.

biodiesel_Brochure5.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post
There is very good reason that Mercedes Benz has modified their previous hard line stance on biofuel use in the USA. The following information also shows why digging up MB warnings published prior to 2013 regarding biofuel use, or older info from any manufacturer may have little value, and can actually be misleading.

Since 2012 B100 used to blend needs to meet an updated ATSM D6751 specification.

https://www.dieselnet.com/tech/fuel_biodiesel_std.php
...
For additional fluid specifications the MB BeVo site should be reviewed.

https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/index.php?language_id=1

https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevol...ets-sort1.html

Be aware that there are links to abbreviated BeVo listings.

http://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevoli...?language_id=1

The PDF's from Avanti's post in case they go away.

080311automotivefuelratings.pdf
biodlabel201405.pdf

For anyone who is concerned that bio will loosen gunk up in your fuel system (as I once was)...
With additives, anti-gel in season, bio, etc. just assume that all are included with the ASTM D975 grade commercial fuel you purchase.

BioFuelLabels05.jpg

Chevron Diesel Fuel Technical Review
Diesel_Fuel_Tech_Review.pdf

This thread is closed. Please take any discussion to the existing biofuel threads.

vic
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:34 PM   #2
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Default Re: Commercial Bio-Fuel and Your Sprinter

Some select posts.
As always clicking on the blue arrow icon within any quote box will take you to the original post/thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Crows View Post
...
(Moderators....perhaps a sticky for post 35/36 or the entire thread is in order.....?????)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmsprinter View Post
MB allows blended fuels UP to B20 (see attached). Some states (MN) have legislated the use of B20 during summer months. MB written guidance is: "If customers cannot avoid the use of biodiesel fuel between B6 and B20, it’s critical for them to monitor their engine oil
level and engine running performance". At various rallies MB has stated the engine computer monitors for this and will automatically adjust the oil change interval (service warning).
[BIODIESEL BROCHURE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by msmolow View Post
I read in various posts here and on FB that B20 voids the warranty. That is an internet myth. MB lists precautions to undertake with extended B20 use, but it does not void the warranty. See the 2017 Sprinter Operator''s Manual, page 275.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooneypaul View Post
There is so much confusion about bio/biomass diesel. I saw this post on the Minnie Winnie’s forum. I think Chevron’s reply should clear up some of this.

‘I have a question regarding the diesel fuel from your Chevron stations. The pump has a green label stating "Ultra Low Sulfur Highway Diesel 15ppm sulfur maximum" The pump also has a black and orange label stating "Biomass-Based Diesel Blend" in quantities between 5 and 20%. My Mercedes dealer states this fuel will void my warranty. Mercedes states; Most fuel stations in the marketplace sport a blend of diesel fuel and biodiesel, the ‘bio’ being derived from a plant base or recycled oil. Mercedes-Benz requires owners to use diesel with less than 5 per cent biodiesel, called B5. The problem is that many outlets throughout the U.S. offer diesel with up to 20 percent biodiesel - B20. This higher level wreaks havoc on the engine, leading to expensive issues not covered by warranties because people have used the wrong fuel. “Continuous use of B20 fuel can lead to fuel filter clogging and injector deposits, and can cause the engine oil level to rise due to unburned fuel washing into the oil pan. A clogged fuel filter as well as injector deposits can cause engine performance degradation while increased engine oil levels due to dilution by unburned fuel can cause engine mechanical damage.” That’s right from a Mercedes pamphlet. So do I avoid all Chevron stations? According to the black and orange label your fuel is not meeting Mercedes Requirements. I am looking forward to Chevron's technical advice.

Reply;

Thank you for the inquiry.

To address your primary concern, we would like to inform you that Chevron diesel fuel may contain up to, but no more than 5% biodiesel.

The wording on the orange label you are referring to “contains biomass-based diesel or biodiesel in quantities between 5 percent and 20 percent” is required by the FTC, and serves to notify the customer that the diesel fuel contains biomass-based diesel (in addition to petroleum-based), but does not necessarily mean it is a biodiesel product.

Biomass-based diesel, also known as renewable diesel, is a hydrocarbon diesel vehicle fuel produced from non-petroleum renewable resources. Renewable diesel is virtually indistinguishable from conventional (petroleum-based) diesel fuel in its chemical composition and performance. Accordingly, renewable diesel is considered a “drop-in” fuel, which means it can be used in blends with conventional diesel fuel, and its presence will be transparent to vehicles or equipment. Chevron diesel fuel with renewable diesel component meets ASTM D975 requirements (basic requirements all diesel fuel must meet).

Biomass-based diesel does not necessarily mean biodiesel, although it is also bio-derived. Biodiesel is produced from similar renewable feedstocks, but its chemical composition is distinctly different, and it is produced using entirely different chemical processes than those used in making renewable diesel.

All diesel fuel sold in the United States is allowed to contain up to 5% volume biodiesel, and still comply with ASTM D975. Any fuel with greater than 5% biodiesel content will have unique labelling with the letter B followed by the volume % biodiesel, and will be blue colored, rather than orange colored label you referenced (please see the images below, with red circle identifying the label you observed).

To answer your question: all Chevron branded diesel fuel meets or exceeds ASTM D975 requirements, which address the requirements for all diesel engines; there is no need to avoid any Chevron branded diesel fuel because it may contain up to, but no more than 5% biodiesel.

We understand this regulatory required labelling and terminology are confusing to the consumer, so we encourage you to please contact us by phone or email if you have any additional questions.


Regards,

Chevron Fuels Technical Service
fueltek@...
tel: +1 510 242 5357 option#3
office hours: Mon-Fri 9-11am; 1-3pm (Pacific)
Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
OMG!
When I read the information cited in Moonypaul's post, it seemed at odds with my understanding. Moreover, it seemed too absurd to be correct. There couldn't possibly be THREE different kinds of labels (green, blue, orange) indicating three distinct dimensions of fuel (sulfer content, biodiesel, and biomass). I had never even heard of the distinction between "biodiesel" and "biomass-based-diesel". Surely, no sane bureoucracy would expose consumers to such.

So, I poked around a bit, and discovered that the above post is absolutely accurate!

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/renewable...abel201405.pdf

https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/fi...uelratings.pdf

BioFuelLabels01.jpg

BioFuelLabels02.jpg

BioFuelLabels03.jpg


Of course, there is also the BLACK label, meaning off-road diesel:

BioFuelLabels04.jpg

I give up.
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Old 01-13-2018, 03:55 PM   #3
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Default Re: Commercial Bio-Fuel and Your Sprinter

Some more recent biofuel discussions. It's almost as fun as engine oil.

https://sprinter-source.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=58693

Still active... and very, very long... Synopsis is below.
https://sprinter-source.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=38965

******

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobnoxious View Post
The Almighty Sprinter Gurus on this forum have previously proclaimed not to worry about using Bio-20. Of course, they never offer any evidence to support their claims. It's just opinion.
...
I believe this would be considered data.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smiller View Post
Before worrying about it too much, consider how many Sprinters there are in the above states. Now consider how many of those are experiencing problems with fuel? I'm personally not aware of any reports, or certainly not any meaningful number. Now consider whether MB would be opening themselves up for a nightmare in terms of warranty claims and lawsuits by actively selling vehicles in a state where vehicles were coming back due to biodiesel problems.

Based on all of the above factors it seems that even up to B20 biodiesel is more of a 'problem if you want it to be' issue rather than anything you really need to worry about in the real world.
My counter to your "Gurus provide no support" post would be for someone to provide data and documentation of warranty repairs being declined by MB with biofuel being specifically cited as the reason.

Apparently worrying about biofuel use is fun for some owners. No problem with that because use it or not it really has no affect on how their Sprinter will operate.

Carry on.

vic

Added: MY SYNOPSIS.

You must be very patient if you got this far into this thread. It continues for many more pages. I'll try to save you some time here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aarpskier View Post
9 pages of theoretical discussion, name-calling, personal preferences, references to MB requirements, etc. All of which has no realistic practical application.

We are within 4 days of completing a two month, seventeen state, 8,000+ mile trip (Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois), at elevations from 600 to 10,000 feet.

To date, traveling 6,808 miles, we have purchased 408.5 gallons of diesel fuel, for an average of 16.7 mpg. Average cost has been $2.95. This fuel has been purchased from twenty different vendors (J&H Oil, Petro, Shell, Exxon, BP, Shell, Chevron, Raceway, Bucees, Circle K, Valero, Sunoco, Loves, Arco, Quik Trip, Maverik, Milepost, Sinclair, Phillips 66, Xpress 24) in ten different states. On several occasions, the vendor was the "only game in town" when we needed fuel. Three of the outlets were completely automated; i.e., no attendant.

All of the fuel was clearly marked Ultra Low Sulphur. There was either (1) no ethanol biodiesel information on the pump, (2) B<5%, or (3) B5% - B20% (rare). Where there was no information on the pump, I asked an attendant (if there was one) about the ethanol biodiesel concentration in their diesel fuel. Not one knew the answer.

So, in real life:

1. We bought and used the fuel available at the location we needed it.

2. On a couple of occasions, where there were multiple outlets in close proximity, we checked and found that everyone was selling diesel with the same posted ethanol biodiesel concentration.

3. We had neither the time nor the inclination to drive around searching for something that probably was not available in any event.

4. If you only use your Unity close to home or confine your camping outings to a single state where you can fill up at personally researched and selected stations, you may be able to precisely control the amount of ethanol biodiesel in your fuel. However, if you use your Unity as intended, you can't.

In short, theoretical talk is interesting, but in practice pretty useless.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrcasella View Post
aarpskier, maybe that's why the dealers couldn't tell you what the ethanol concentration was since there is no ethanol added to #2 diesel. Yes, Federal rules require that Road use diesel pumps must be labelled Ultra Low Sulfur and also bio content. 0-5 - no labelling required. 5-20 is labelled as 20, and anything above 20 must be labelled. This is the latest Mercedes Bio-Diesel Brochure: https://lookaside.fbsbx.com/file/Mer...1kVvF2T6-D9xLC.
Follow the guidance. If routinely using bio above 5%, more frequent oil changes are recommended - 10K, vice 20k. Also, limit idling to 5 minutes or less. We had Mercedes Engineers at the Skinny-Winnie Rally at Winnebago, at Paso Robles View/Navion Rally, and are going to be at our next rally in Virginia. They repeated this info - also recommended checking oil level. Also, don't use biomass diesel - that Mercedes does not approve in any percentage. Last, don't sweat it. A tank or two of bio content at 20% is not going to make a difference. If in Minnesota or most of Illinois and can't avoid routine fill up with B20, just follow the guidance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrcasella View Post
... Also, don't use biomass diesel - that Mercedes does not approve in any percentage. ...
That isn't in conflict with earlier information posted here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post
...

If you follow the Mercedes guidelines for blue label B20 (not at all difficult), use blue label B20 or not, it ain't gonna matter.

vic
Biomass fuel is easily identified by the required orange label.

BiodieselMB.jpg

It appears that suppliers can benefit buying (producing?) B100 and blending their own fuel.

A 2013 Overview.
When your customers pull up to the diesel pump, they want to know exactly what they are getting. Clearly posting your price and the diesel grade are part of your every day operation. Biodiesel pump label requirements give travel centers an opportunity to easily integrate biodiesel blends.

First, 48 states require B100 (pure biodiesel) meets quality specifications before blending, just like diesel fuel. All truck stops or travel centers purchasing B100 in order to take advantage of the federal blenders tax credit for $1.00 per gallon must purchase fuel that meets the ASTM D 6751 specification. You can ask your biodiesel provider for a copy of a recent certificate of analysis to prove your fuel quality at the initial blend was on spec.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulates pump labeling within four categories; B1-B5, B6-B20, B20+ and B100. FTC biodiesel pump labels are blue in color. Orange labels denote the broader category of biomass-based diesel which could also include renewable diesel.
https://www.natso.com/blog/truckstop...nts-unraveled-
List of States.
https://afdc.energy.gov/laws/matrix?sort_by=tech

vic
Some info from Chevron about bio-mass fuels (orange label = prohibited by MB) vs biodiesel (blue label = accepted by MB to B20).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooneypaul View Post
There is so much confusion about bio/biomass diesel. I saw this post on the Minnie Winnie’s forum. I think Chevron’s reply should clear up some of this.
...
The wording on the orange label you are referring to “contains biomass-based diesel or biodiesel in quantities between 5 percent and 20 percent” is required by the FTC, and serves to notify the customer that the diesel fuel contains biomass-based diesel (in addition to petroleum-based), but does not necessarily mean it is a biodiesel product.
...
Biomass-based diesel [orange label] does not necessarily mean biodiesel, although it is also bio-derived. Biodiesel is produced from similar renewable feedstocks, but its chemical composition is distinctly different, and it is produced using entirely different chemical processes than those used in making renewable diesel.
...
Regards,

Chevron Fuels Technical Service
fueltek@...
tel: +1 510 242 5357 option#3
office hours: Mon-Fri 9-11am; 1-3pm (Pacific)


And finally, some info is in this video. (Don't let the creepy man in the preview capture scare you off.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BTmages View Post
Watch starting at 13:00 min in, Mercedes rep talking about Biodiesel and Sprinter-Based RV:

*******
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"My opinion and worth everything you'll never pay for it." assumed.
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16 ounces of unnecessary prevention can be worth a pound of manure.

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Old 01-13-2018, 04:04 PM   #4
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Default Re: Commercial Bio-Fuel and Your Sprinter

I'll sneak in some anti-gel information. Some opinion, but there is data provided.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post
There have been quite a few posts lately where no start seems to trace to gelled or waxed fuel.

There are unseasonable temperatures over much of the USA. The winter fuel blends are supposed to address low temperature operation. The unseasonably cold temperatures caught some with their pants down. Even though winter fuel blends are introduced early in the season, not everyone uses enough fuel to change their tank over completely to winter blend. Dilution/replacement of the summer blend takes regular refilling. I have no control over what "winter blend" fuel comes out of the pump. I do have control over adding an anti-gel.

No matter what others may tell you, using an anti-gel aka flow improver will not automatically void your warranty. Many of those poo-pooing the use of additives live in warmer areas. They don't need to deal with the problems of extreme cold. It is easy for them to live the no additives lifestyle and recommend the same for others.

I look at my use of anti-gel during winter as cheap insurance. Once your fuel is gelled it takes effort to get back to normal. Extra cranking with no start is not good for your engine.

I use Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement+Cetane Boost Diesel Fuel Anti-Gel because it is readily available. I am convinced that it helps. Many other proven anti-gel commercial products are available.

http://www.truevalue.com/product/Die...ower%20service

https://mbworld.org/forums/glk-class...-additive.html


If you choose to use an anti-gel follow the dosing instructions.

Do with this information what you will.

vic

Added:
Lindenengineering recommends BG products. They are a bit more pricey and more difficult to source than the Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement+Cetane Boost Diesel Fuel Anti-Gel product if that matters to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lindenengineering View Post
OK it now time to beat the LANDROVER drum and BG products.

As you may know we fix Landrovers & Jags at LinDen lots of 'em!
I also use BG products as being very good .
I refer to their service bulletin.
Diesel Fuel Recommended Anti Waxing NA Markets.
Condensed:- In cold weather diesel engines can experience difficulties.

Formation of wax crystals plug filters. Inconsistent fuel quality summer and winter blends.
Use and recommend BG products DFC HP Extra cold performance additive BG 23711

Same With cetane improver 23811.


Add during fueling when temperature are at least 3 Celsius (38F) and allow mixing by allowing to idle for a short while after filling.

So there you have it from the nice people at Landrover/Jag in Mahwah NJ.
Dennis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nhuskys View Post
What do you do when fueling below 3C (38F)? Where I live we have extended period well below 0C (32F).
That question came to my mind too.
As an aside, I've noticed that most all anti-gel aka flow improvers recommend addition to the tank prior to extreme cold weather and during subsequent fuel fills. Adding the product after the fact is not as effective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lindenengineering View Post
Add it and a carry on !
Don't panic !
Info by Landrover & HM Gov (Min of Information!)

I simply did a quick transpose of the Landrover /Jag broadsheet bulletin about the recent cold weather and diesel fuel waxing etc.
I was impressed & being very proactive , because they came flat out and recommended a product that we use and also recommend for Sprinters.

In fact it's also been the choice of John Deere mechanics and Ag tractors in the field and farm for a while now..
Dennis
For those who like to stay with Mother Mercedes.
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/110.1_en.html

The Additives spec 119. MB has reduced the information considerably from what I quoted and used in my older threads. I suspect it relates to legal reasons, or just that Mother Mercedes doesn't want her children to have too much information.
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/119.0_en.html

Here's the text as of January 2018 in case they eliminate the info completely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB119.0
Additives and secondary additives for fuels
Due to the increased demands placed on fuels, it is necessary to optimize certain properties of the base fuels. Additives can lend additional properties to fuels or increase or mitigate existing properties. Additives are fuel-soluble compounds of mainly organic chemical nature.

A variety of properties can be influenced by additives, they e.g. prevent or reduce the formation of deposits of combustion products in the fuel injection system and engine or corrosion damage in the fuel system. Usage properties can also be improved using additives, a foam-inhibiting additive is e.g. frequently used in diesel fuels.

Numerous additives are used in commercially available fuels. Some examples are listed below.

Gasoline
Octane number booster
Detergents
Corrosion inhibitors
Antioxidants
Conductivity booster
Dyes/markers
Demulsifying agent
Diesel fuel
Cetane number booster
Detergents
Corrosion inhibitors
Antioxidants
Conductivity booster
Foam-inhibiting additives
Flowability booster
Lubricity booster
Dyes/markers
Demulsifying agent


A special case are organometallic compounds such as e g. methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl, ferrocene and tetraethyl lead which are still used in some countries to boost the octane number. These additives have very negative effects on the advanced engine and exhaust treatment technology. The Worldwide Fuel Charter therefore advises against the use of additives forming ashes (containing metal).

Extensive research has shown that the use of gasoline and diesel fuels with high additivity levels is a necessary measure, and in the long term also a cost-effective one, for the service life and cleanliness of engines and fuel systems, maintenance of favorable exhaust emission values as well as for achieving a good performance overall.

In terms of the supply of such fuels, the individual customer must rely on the filling stations that he/she visits selling such fuels with additives; the opinion of large companies passed-on to us has shown that this is the case nationally, and is usually the case in respect of independent filling stations not tied to major suppliers. Fleet owners should therefore ensure that products with additives are delivered when negotiating on a bi-lateral level.

The correct selection, application and metering of such additives depend on detailed research in the laboratory, on test benches and in vehicles, so that the effect of the additives is optimized for the respective fuel, additives are adapted to each other and do not cause any negative side effects. Since the consumer will generally not have the required facilities for this, mixing additives to fuels may be the exclusive preserve of the manufacturers of such fuels.

However, drivers are constantly being offered fuel additives with the promise of huge success, such as higher engine output at lower fuel consumption, for example. For better distinction, we have designated these additives secondary additives . Our vehicle engines generally do not require such secondary additives, since in most cases uniform and adequate grades of fuel can be assumed. Special attention should be paid to making sure that only the fuel grade recommended by us is used. The use of secondary additives however, is mostly an additional cost burden that is not necessary and in the worst case it can lead to permanent damage. In individual markets with a poor fuel grade, additional use of additives may be required. In such special instance, additives which are tried and tested and approved for Mercedes-Benz vehicles are recommended by the Mercedes-Benz specialist workshops. Please ensure that you observe the instructions and mixing ratios specified on the container.

We strongly advise against the use of secondary additives that are not approved by Mercedes-Benz. The application of secondary additives is always at the risk of the operator of the vehicle, since their use may impair any warranty issued both by the manufacturer of the vehicle and the fuel supplier.
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/131.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/132.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/134.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/135.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/136.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/136.1_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/136.2_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/137.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/138.0_en.html
https://bevo.mercedes-benz.com/bevolisten/138.1_en.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Mc View Post
Guys, about what temp does fuel start to gel to the point of no start ?? Thanks, Frank

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post


I know that summer fuel can gell or wax around 15F. Winter fuel *should* be good down well into minus F temperatures.

I treat my fuel so I don't worry when our ambient drops below 0F maybe -5F. Our ambient can drop to -15F and lower. My method is to begin treating before those temperatures are expected.

Note in this link that the USA really doesn't have official or strict regulations for winter diesel fuel blend.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_diesel_fuel

Added:
"United States[edit]
In the United States there is no legislation on a fixed time frame when winter diesel must meet a specific temperature characteristic. The ASTM D 975 standard does not specify the cold flow requirements of diesel fuel. Instead, it suggests that the cloud point be no more than 6°C higher than the 10th percentile minimum ambient temperature for the month the fuel will be used. The 10th percentile temperature corresponds to the minimum temperature that would be reached no more than 3 days out of 30 for the month (decile). The ASTM D 975 contains overview maps that show the expected tenth percentile temperature for every month for each state."

My interpretation. There may be unseasonably cold days in a month which by the guidelines the fuel supplier doesn't need to worry about the winter blend being good enough. But the vehicle owner may need to operate each and every day of the month.

This is an example for October. The full ASTM standard requires a subscription.


WinterFuel.jpg


Note that once gelled, fuel needs to be brought above the gell temperature to completely restore the fuel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gel_point_(petroleum)

I would rather avoid those problems than worry about them.

vic
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Old 04-07-2019, 03:20 PM   #5
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Default Re: Commercial Bio-Fuel and Your Sprinter

There is very good reason that Mercedes Benz has modified their previous hard line stance on biofuel use in the USA. The following information also shows why digging up MB warnings published prior to 2013 regarding biofuel use, or older info from any manufacturer may have little value, and can actually be misleading.

Since 2012 B100 used to blend needs to meet an updated ATSM D6751 specification.

https://www.dieselnet.com/tech/fuel_biodiesel_std.php

"Two major specifications establishing the quality requirements for alkyl ester-based biodiesel fuels are the ASTM D6751 in the USA and the EN 14214 in Europe.
...
Approaches to US and EU standards for biodiesel differ. In the USA, ASTM D6751 establishes specifications for a biodiesel blend stock for middle distillate fuels. While the specification was written for B100, it is not intended for neat biodiesel used as automotive fuel. Rather, it is for the biodiesel component that is to be blended to produce biodiesel/diesel fuel blends. Since 2012, the ASTM D6751 standard defines two grades of biodiesel: grade 2-B (identical to biodiesel defined by earlier versions of the standard) and grade 1-B with tighter controls on monoglycerides and cold soak filterability. Two automotive standards for biodiesel/diesel fuel blends have been published by ASTM:

The ASTM Standard Specification for Diesel Oil, ASTM D975 [commercial on road diesel], was modified in 2008 to allow up to 5% biodiesel to be blended into the fuel.
ASTM D7467 is a specification for biodiesel blends from B6 to B20."

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