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Old 07-28-2018, 03:09 AM   #11
HighPockets
 
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Default Re: The Tamago

Man, that is one awesome air conditioner. Mercedes put a lot of work into that. They even changed the roof panels to fit it in better. Compared to an add-on roof top AC, well, there is no comparison. Don't ever try to sell that van down south, they (we) will give you the "are you nuts" look, actually we will just tell you to your face. But hey, we each have to adapt to our own climate and needs, ha, ha.

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Old 08-03-2018, 05:16 AM   #12
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Default Insulation

Everyone's favorite topic! Insulation!

First, a huge thanks to everyone on the forum for sharing their experiences! (With insulation and everything else!) I probably should have started this build thread by saying this. I have learned so much from this forum and the Airstream forums over the years and I’m very grateful.

Ask five van owners about the best insulation plan and you will get eight answers and an argument. People have strong opinions about insulation. This is what we did. I'm quite pleased with the results.

For a measurement of sound insulation, I drove the van on a particular section of freeway at a set speed and took a decibel reading with an app on my phone. After the insulation steps here I drove the same section at the same speed. Before: max 105 dB, average 90 dB. After: max 70 dB, average 65 dB. I'll take another measurement after the wall panels and cabinets are in.

I didn't have a good way of measuring the heat transfer difference, but treated and bare sections of the van were remarkably different to the touch on a hot day.

Here's the "sandwich" on the floors, from top to bottom:
• Coin vinyl sheet flooring
• vinyl sheet flooring glue
• 1/8" plywood
• 1/4" cross-linked polyethylene
• Lizard Skin ceramic coating
• Lizard Skin sound deadener
• van floor

And on the walls/ceiling, from the inside out:
• 1/4" plywood
• 1/4" cross-linked polyethelyne and PVC washers wherever plywood and 8020 framing is attached to the van structure to make a thermal break
• Thinsulate 600
• Lizard Skin ceramic coating
• Lizard Skin sound deadener
• van walls/roof

First, our van came with the Cold Weather Package (C08), which includes "Heat Insulation" (H01 and H04). This is really just some non-dense foam glued to the body panels. We needed this gone so we could apply the Lizard Skin. It was really easy to remove with a plastic plaster knife.

Next I cleaned and cleaned, paying attention to where MB had coated the bottoms of the wall cavities with that waxy coating (which I left in place), removing any sticky adhesive residue, and scuffing surfaces that had a shine that were bound for Lizard Skin application.
Then I taped and taped and taped. I taped all tapped holes and screw heads I found and protected wiring. I taped any holes that led to areas I didn't want to coat with Lizard Skin. This included the B pillars, the door latch areas and the areas behind the window trim (which I didn't want to remove).

Then we applied the Lizard Skin. Lizard Skin is a coating that is well known in the race car communities, but less so in the camper/trailer world. There are two types of Lizard Skin: a sound deadener (for sound insulation) and a ceramic coating for thermal insulation. They are both more like paint than anything else (it is notspray-in foam!), and they can be used in a sandwich, with the ceramic applied over the sound deadener. I learned about Lizard Skin from KeneTube on the Sprinter Forums (thanks Ken!) and we bought ours from SummitRacing.com. There's lots of great videos out there on how to apply Lizard Skin, especially from the Lizard Skin folks themselves. We used 6 gallons of sound deadener and 6 gallons of sound deadener and we used the special Lizard Skin applicator.

Sound deadener (black) goes on before the ceramic (white). The folks at Lizard Skin have some great videos on how to apply both products, and we used the special spray gun they sell, which seemed to work well. They say to use an air compressor that can move 70 PSI at 5 CFM, but if you can get a beefier air compressor it will help speed up the process.

Because the Lizard Skin is a thin coating we tried to apply it everywhere we could. We taped over all threaded holes, of course.

Thinsulate is an amazing material that is hydrophobic, light weight and also has excellent sound and insulation properties. There's lots of information about Thinsulate on the Sprinter Forums and elsewhere. We used 600L from Hein and Kim on their Ebay store. We used a good pair of scissors to cut it and we applied it to the van walls with 3M 90 adhesive. We purchased 50 linear feet, which gave us some extra, which we will use in a few other spots in our build.

Others have posted a lot about Thinsulite installation, and I will only add to it here to say that it was delightfully easy to install. For us it was especially so because the vertical areas that got coated with Lizard Skin didn't need any 3M 90 spray - the texture of the Lizard Skin was enough to hold the Thinsulite in place. We did still use 3M 90 on the pieces that went on the ceiling.

On the floor, we placed a layer of 1/4" cross-linked polyethelyne, over the Lizard skin and then placed the factory floor on top of the foam. Cross-linked polyethylene is sometimes called minicell or closed-cell foam. It's a super dense foam that has nice sound and thermal insulation properties. It's lightweight and easy to work with. I bought ours from FoamByMail.com.

On top of the factory floor we put a layer of 1/8" plywood to which we glued 95 mil coin vinyl. We wanted to get a single sheet of Coin Vinyl Flooring so that we didn't have to deal with seams. We purchased 11' (it comes in a 7.5' roll) from GarageFlooring.com. Because we were only buying 11' we couldn't get the felt-backed version, but it ended up working out great. Most vinyl flooring glue is for felt-backed vinyl sheet flooring, so be careful if you use this kind of sheet vinyl that you get a glue that is appropriate for non-felt-backed vinyl sheet flooring.


More photos on my van build page.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:25 AM   #13
TamagoVan
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Default Fuse question

I just saw a problem in my wiring schematic. I had been moving forward with the 300A Class-T fuse that came with the Victron 2000 inverter kit from AM Solar between the battery and the battery disconnect.

But I also have the Victron 220A Battery Protect (after the battery disconnect, before the positive bus). The Battery Protect needs a fuse as well, and a 300A fuse won't provide enough protection for it. So I think I can replace the 300A fuse with a 200A (also Class T) (as shown in orange on the diagram below) and be in the clear. Anyone see any problems with that?

Thanks!
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Old 08-03-2018, 12:30 PM   #14
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Default Re: Fuse question

Quote:
Originally Posted by TamagoVan View Post
I just saw a problem in my wiring schematic. I had been moving forward with the 300A Class-T fuse that came with the Victron 2000 inverter kit from AM Solar between the battery and the battery disconnect.



But I also have the Victron 220A Battery Protect (after the battery disconnect, before the positive bus). The Battery Protect needs a fuse as well, and a 300A fuse won't provide enough protection for it. So I think I can replace the 300A fuse with a 200A (also Class T) (as shown in orange on the diagram below) and be in the clear. Anyone see any problems with that?



Thanks!


The Battery Protect will only let current flow in one direction. This means that you can’t use the inverter/charger to top up our battery from shore power.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:36 PM   #15
TamagoVan
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Default Re: The Tamago

Ah! Well, that's a problem! Thank you, 96r50. I didn't realize that.

So I need to put the battery protect after the positive bus, and only on my DC load circuits (organized in to passenger-side loads and driver-side loads in my schematic). I'll put the 300A T-class fuse back where it was, between the positive bus and the inverter/charger.

It sounds like I need an additional fuse between the positive bus and the battery protect, as in the diagram below (I've also tried to spread out my spaghetti in to something easier to read!).

Any advice on what kind of fuse to use here? A 200A ANL?

Thanks!
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Old 08-04-2018, 01:49 PM   #16
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Default Re: The Tamago

I don’t see why a 200 ANL fuse wouldn’t work in that spot.

Is there a reason that the positive line from the solar input runs directly to the battery while the other positive connections (inverter/charger, DC loads) run through the battery disconnect and the positive bus bar?

Is there a way you can simplify the amount of disconnects you have in the system? Right now there are the driver and passenger side load disconnects, the BP220, and the battery disconnect. Can you merge some of them into a single disconnect point and simplify your layout further?
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:08 PM   #17
TamagoVan
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Default Re: The Tamago

That's an excellent point, 96r50. Having the solar positive connected directly to the positive of the battery was advice I got from the folks I bought my Victron MPPT controller and the Victron Inverter/Converter from. However, it never made much sense to me, and I know that many (most?) folks on the forum have the solar positive going through the bus, which makes more sense, especially since we have a nice beefy bus.

I really like the idea of simplifying, and I was also feeling a bit like I wanted to have a disconnect just for the inverter. So I've combined the DC load disconnects in to one switch and moved one switch to the inverter circuit in the diagram below. I'm not sure if this is simpler, but I think I like it better. :) One thing this design requires is to double up two 4 AWG lugs on one post of the negative bus and also on the out side of the DC load disconnect switch. I've not done that before but I don't think it should be a problem, but I'd love to hear if others have different opinions.

Thanks!
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:47 AM   #18
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Default Solar Panels, Fans, and Awning

The fans are in and everything fits beautifully! I'm still making the front fairing, so I will have more detail shots soon, but here's a look at the final layout.

Three 180W Grape Solar panels
Two Maxxair Deluxe Fans
One 12' Dometic Power Awning
80/20 roof rack

The rear fan is snugged up closer to the center line to allow space for upper cabinets on the inside. The front fan is by the slider, so no upper cabinets there and it could come towards the slider door a bit.

Our vented window is behind the driver seat, so with those three openable ports (one window and two vents) we should have plenty of screened air flow options, even in the rain.
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Old 08-07-2018, 02:16 AM   #19
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Default Re: Solar Panels, Fans, and Awning

Quote:
Originally Posted by TamagoVan View Post
The fans are in and everything fits beautifully! I'm still making the front fairing, so I will have more detail shots soon, but here's a look at the final layout.



Three 180W Grape Solar panels

Two Maxxair Deluxe Fans

One 12' Dometic Power Awning

80/20 roof rack



The rear fan is snugged up closer to the center line to allow space for upper cabinets on the inside. The front fan is by the slider, so no upper cabinets there and it could come towards the slider door a bit.



Our vented window is behind the driver seat, so with those three openable ports (one window and two vents) we should have plenty of screened air flow options, even in the rain.

Nice use of 80/20 for the solar roof rack. I'm planning something similar for my next Sprinter B-van.



- - Mike
2012 Sprinter 3500 Extended converted B-Van by Airstream
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Old 08-07-2018, 11:12 PM   #20
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Default Re: The Tamago

Quote:
Originally Posted by TamagoVan View Post
That's an excellent point, 96r50. Having the solar positive connected directly to the positive of the battery was advice I got from the folks I bought my Victron MPPT controller and the Victron Inverter/Converter from. However, it never made much sense to me, and I know that many (most?) folks on the forum have the solar positive going through the bus, which makes more sense, especially since we have a nice beefy bus.



I really like the idea of simplifying, and I was also feeling a bit like I wanted to have a disconnect just for the inverter. So I've combined the DC load disconnects in to one switch and moved one switch to the inverter circuit in the diagram below. I'm not sure if this is simpler, but I think I like it better. :) One thing this design requires is to double up two 4 AWG lugs on one post of the negative bus and also on the out side of the DC load disconnect switch. I've not done that before but I don't think it should be a problem, but I'd love to hear if others have different opinions.



Thanks!

Looks good! You could simplify further if you wanted, saving costs, space, and time. I crammed all my electrical (except the inverter/charger) into the driver’s seat base so I tried to minimize non-critical components as I only had a small space to work in, hence my perspective here. I’m certainly not saying you’re doing anything wrong, just providing a different view of your system.

Do you need the inverter disconnect or can you simply shut off the inverter/charger when required? How close to each other are the inverter/charger and battery? Can you get away with the one 300A fuse on a short wire run or do you have a longer run that should be protected at both ends?

Similarly, do you need to be able to completely disconnect the battery often or can you just undo a battery terminal (or the 300A fuse) the odd time you need to remove the battery from the system?

Presumably your DC loads all run through a fuse block or breakers, so do you need a DC load disconnect?

I assume the dotted line to the BP220 is a control wire for a low voltage/SoC disconnect? You could look at adding a switch in that line to trigger it on/off as needed which could give you the load disconnect ability without an extra in-line switch.

Hope that helps provide some other ideas!
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