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Old 07-26-2017, 09:14 PM   #911
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Quote:
Originally Posted by hein View Post
The sliding door still had fiberglass insulation from the previous owner's conversion work. Time to update that to the 'Thinsulate sandwich'. First step was to seal the trim clip holes so removed the trim per Geek's video. The trim was in full sun and almost too hot to touch so it popped off pretty easily. I had released some of the clips from the inside so that helped. After they were all out I put a bead of 3M Window Weld around each one and popped them back into the door. Then snapped the trim piece back on. With that done it was time to go inside, turn on the air conditioner, some music, and install the insulation.

Step 1. EZcool layer loosely installed against the van skin. Pulled in and unrolled in the less accessible areas above and below the window and along the sides. The EZcool is taped together and held in place with foil tape. The Dynamat was installed previously.



Below - Steps 2 & 3. Thinsulate and then a layer of Reflectix cut to fit the openings. Strips of Thinsulate are poked/pulled into less accessible areas. The EZcool lining makes that easier. For the larger areas Thinsulate is held in place against the EZcool with 3M 90 spray adhesive.



Similar layup above the window but no Reflectix on the openings because I may want to add storage pockets to the panel that goes here.



Note: Thinsulate is very effective without the other layers I installed.

All finished with the door panel back on.



More insulation photos and explanation: http://sprinter-source.com/forum/sho...&postcount=133
As many have said before, thank you for all the work you have done to show the progress of your amazing build.

I have a few questions, but will likely need to break them up so I can better formulate what I am asking and to what end...So Question Number 1: With your masterful use of space, why did you opt to replace the door panel after addressing the Window and Leak in post #637/#638? I was wondering if there was any storage space to be had in the door, especially as it slides back in place along the outside passenger side of the van with space between the door and the van. I was looking at your plates on the rear door spaces and was thinking there might be a way to use a similar idea on the slider, working around the diagonal cross brace of course. I am trying to find a place to put some shoes that is both out of the way and accessible.

Thanks in advance for your time and consideration.
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Old 07-30-2017, 01:51 AM   #912
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

We've had some requests for slider door storage so will get that going.
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Old 09-14-2017, 10:54 PM   #913
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Glide-Rite air suspension was leaking down while parked for an extended time and then eventually would not raise the vehicle to proper ride height. Culprit was the ride height control valve. Glide-rite quoted $300 but I was able to find the same valve for under $50. Sent the first one back because it appeared to be leaking fluid. These valves are interesting because they are fluid damped. Pretty straight forward replacement. Linkage to rear axle actuates the valve to maintain correct ride height. It's damped/delayed so it doesn't cycle too fast to allow for motion while driving.



The repair project made me consider the dangers of working on a pressurized air suspension while laying under the vehicle with limited clearance. I parked the van on blocks to raise it up so I could work on it with the air springs fully deflated. Then depressurized the system from above.

Found this document about the hazard: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/pm85.pdf
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Last edited by hein; 09-14-2017 at 11:57 PM.
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Old 10-27-2017, 06:39 AM   #914
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

We originally installed a Magnum Smart Battery Combiner and it's worked great but not really enough charge capacity for our 4 battery 500Ah AGM under vehicle bank. I selected the Sterling 60A battery to battery charger and have started the install by selecting a location and mounting it under the vehicle. Although IP 68 rated for water exposure, the external cooling fan is susceptible to water damage. If it fails then it's easy enough to replace and I'll consider a splash shield if that occurs.

Some of the components:


First set of photos below. Charger is mounted on a piece of Celtec bonded to the bottom of the van with marine adhesive. Celtec holds screws extremely well and also offers a layer of insulation for the electrical component.

Location next to RH frame rail with surfaces cleaned and prepped for mounting plate. That's the end of the DEF tank on our 3500.


Mounting plate with generous beads of adhesive applied.


In place and adhesive smeared all around. Cable running across is 120V for water heater in engine compartment. Electrical box to left in subsequent photo houses an exterior 120V GFI outlet and a relay for energizing the water heater.


Mounted the charger a few days later after adhesive cured.


I will need a fuse where the + cable connects to the house battery. Sterling calls for 80A so I decided to use a mini-anl. I looked at some commercial holders but didn't really like the way they were designed. So I did a little tinkering and came up with a nice little inline holder. It's some ABS plastic with brass press-in 1/4-20 inserts for screws that secure the fuse and lug.

Fuse holder:


It will be under the van so needed a water resistant cover. Some clear PVC tubing will do the trick:


Also mounted the charger's remote in the headliner above the overhead console. Then ran the cable over and down behind the A-pillar trim, dropped through the dash, behind the kick panel and into the passenger foot well where I drilled a hole and routed the cable underneath to the charger.

Remote mounted:


Hole with grommet for cable:
(photo coming)

Any trim disassembly is always a good opportunity to add some Thinsulate(TM) SM600L.


More coming up...
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Last edited by hein; 10-31-2017 at 03:50 PM.
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Old 10-27-2017, 07:18 AM   #915
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

A quick observation.
I used a 200A fuse in a sealed holder in a situation where it used 150A for about an hour for a water heater. The sealed plastic housing melted and it eventually failed when liquid plastic got into the wire/fuse connection. I replaced with the same holder with holes drilled for ventilation and things have worked fine.
The fuse works by melting / heating until failure. It never got hot enough to "fuse" but because it was in a sealed housing it did get hot enough to melt things around it.
If you use high currents for a long time you may have a similar issue.

Ron
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Old 10-31-2017, 03:31 PM   #916
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Happy Halloween. Here's my trick!

Sometimes it's necessary to have an inline fuse near the post of a battery for a voltage sense wire or hardwired trickle charger. I like to make my own ATO fuse holder for that and similar situations. Here is an example using 2 crimp-on flag terminals, some shrink tube and a drop or two of CA glue to bond the terminals together before and after the shrink tube. A final step would be to inject some hot glue into the wire end of the crimp terminals to seal and stabilize the wire.





All the best,
Hein
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:06 AM   #917
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Quote:
Originally Posted by hein View Post
Happy Halloween. Here's my trick!

Sometimes it's necessary to have an inline fuse near the post of a battery for a voltage sense wire or hardwired trickle charger. I like to make my own ATO fuse holder for that and similar situations. Here is an example using 2 crimp-on flag terminals, some shrink tube and a drop or two of CA glue to bond the terminals together before and after the shrink tube. A final step would be to inject some hot glue into the wire end of the crimp terminals to seal and stabilize the wire.





All the best,
Hein
DIYvan.com
Very nice. I helped a couple on the road with a dead Aux battery (and warm beer), and had to make one of these up. Much better than the poorly made holders hawked at many auto stores. A real fire hazard they are!
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Old 11-11-2017, 05:06 AM   #918
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Continuing with the Sterling 60A DC to DC charger install...

To bypass the OEM Y-cable and carry the house battery charge load on a dedicated wiring, I added a 80 terminal fuse on the alternator and ran 2 gauge positive and ground cables directly to the charger located roughly mid-ship underneath the van . (location of charger shown above)

Terminal fuse and cable attached to 200A OEM alternator:


Slightly bent terminal fuse holder to make it fit cleanly on the alternator post.


Alternator from below showing fuse and engine to charger ground cable:


Cable routing along DEF tank fill/vent plumbing behind front right fender liner (removed). Cable continues to rear over passenger step well storage box and DEF tank to the charger.


Charger with cables, remote, temp sense and control switch wires attached. Need to cover terminals and install cover. Front of vehicle is to the bottom of the image (that's the rear of the DEF tank). Added frame ground stud is where the cable from the engine, charger ground and the cable continuing to house system shunt are connected. ATC maxi fuse holder is for the charger and it's on the chassis ground lead. (not sure why)


(Below) Crimping lug and attaching chassis ground (from stud above) to shunt. (so Ah coming from alternator are accounted for in the State Of Charge) That's the house electrical panel in the front of the galley cabinet. Vent opening towards bottom allows access to cables and wires coming from under the van and provides cool air for the 2800W inverter/charger located behind the panel.


To do: Install a control switch in the dash that will be used to enable(on/off) the charger and run it in either automatic(voltage sense) or ignition trigger modes. I'll use one of our 3D printed dash adapters with SPDT center off switch. (on left in photo below)


While working behind the dash will take opportunity to install a dual pressure gauge for monitoring the GlideRite air suspension system. The gauge will be read tank and air spring pressures. (Below) Back of gauge installed in left side lower dash bezel below headlight switch.


Front of gauge installed in bezel


Installed in dash. but yet to be wired to sensors and power. (more wires to run and connect)


More work to do but getting close. Nice to work inside the heated barn while it's pouring rain outside. Wish I had that luxury when first starting the build. I recall installing the batteries under the van in freezing temps. 65F is much better.
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Old 11-11-2017, 12:38 PM   #919
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Hello Hein :)
Theresa "Rookie" here...building out my new 2017 144"...I am at the stage of installing the Thinsulate...so excited....and noticed you are the first picture to have the black side against the metal of the vehicle. Most of the "others" have pics installing it with spray adhesive with the white side to the metal....is there somewhere that states which way is correct?
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Old 11-11-2017, 03:05 PM   #920
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Default Re: 2010 3500 RV build

Hein, Nice write up, as usual. But, why? I've heard of Sterling in techie circles but does this simply allow DC charging of house components (battery?) in a better manner or from your power plant instead of panels?
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