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Old 03-20-2019, 01:57 PM   #531
Graphite Dave
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Default Re: Using 80/20

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Originally Posted by pfflyer View Post
Great find. Have you used this and if I understand the video there is no installation tool?
I did not use these but would have if I had known they existed. Would have used them where I bolted the 80/20 to the van walls and floor. I did thermally isolated the connections either with plywood or plastic spacers.

Wonder what the difference is on load capacity compared to Plusnuts.
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Old 03-20-2019, 03:17 PM   #532
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Default Re: Using 80/20

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Originally Posted by Graphite Dave View Post
One method of thermally isolating a 80/20 structure from the van steel:

https://www.boellhoff.com/us-en/prod...-rivnut-av.php

Aluminum is a very good conductor. When the extrusions are directly bolted to the van steel the aluminum gets close to the temperature of the steel van body.
What exactly would you use these for with a max shear force rating of 250N?
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:08 PM   #533
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Default Re: Using 80/20

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How much weight saving does 80/20 have in a typical built out van? Assuming that's the goal. I want a 2500 van instead of a 3500 for an RV and looking for suggestions.
To get an accurate weight comparison I would suggest doing some rough sketches of both designs. The primary difference in plywood and aluminum construction is a frame versus a cube. There is no need for galley’s bottom or rear panels with 8020 but with plywood they are needed for strength. Panels are needed for esthetics or cargo containment but not for strength with 8020.

I did some weight analysis for galley and overhead cabinets a while back. See the worksheet attached. To achieve the same strength most likely ¾ plywood would need to be used, or additional braces and thinner plywood. Frame construction allows to eliminate back, bottom or side panels. The galley analysis indicates 3/4” plywood being about 30% heavier if you include mounting hardware, corner braces, screws and nuts. A countertop could be a big factor but for the sake of reasonable comparison I didn’t included it. My O/H cabinets were much lighter with 8020 and sliding doors versus plywood.

I think that in your endeavor 8020 would be a prime candidate for bunk beds. Framed bunk beds would open up already confined space. A ladder could be made from 80/20 using #2051 glide with a hinge to mimic functionality of a library ladder.
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:35 PM   #534
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Default Using 80/20

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Originally Posted by Davydd View Post
How much weight saving does 80/20 have in a typical built out van? Assuming that's the goal. I want a 2500 van instead of a 3500 for an RV and looking for suggestions.


As mentioned 80/20 is more about convenience at a price. In most cases it will weigh less than solid ply construction. But if you have welding skills, steel or aluminum tubing will produce the lightest possible setup.

I used aluminum tubing for things that I would be lifting often, the bed panels. I used steel tubing for the stationary components such as my refrigerator cabinet and the rear storage benches.







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