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Old 09-01-2019, 06:12 AM   #51
Wyuna
 
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

It would be 448 ah as I’d imagine the 224 ah 6 volt batteries will be wired together to form a 12 volt system
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Old 09-01-2019, 06:42 AM   #52
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

Quote:
Originally Posted by smcochra View Post
So this amounts to ~900aH? Can you comment on battery sizing and operating your stereo system (+ sub/amp)? Is the head unit powered off the house batteries or starter?

Awesome build - thanks for the writeup.

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Yes, 448 ah at 12 volts. My Pioneer head unit is currently powered off my starter battery. May add an option to power it off the house battery in the future but in no rush to open up the dash and the maze of wires behind it. My subwoofer amp is powered by the auxiliary battery but my long range plan is to eliminate the auxiliary battery and switch the AGM batteries to lithium which will increase my usable ah capacity even without the auxiliary battery. The current AGM setup is more than sufficient to operate 7+ days without any solar or other charging source.


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Old 09-07-2019, 01:36 AM   #53
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

Quote:
Originally Posted by gltrimble View Post
Yes, 448 ah at 12 volts. My Pioneer head unit is currently powered off my starter battery. May add an option to power it off the house battery in the future but in no rush to open up the dash and the maze of wires behind it. My subwoofer amp is powered by the auxiliary battery but my long range plan is to eliminate the auxiliary battery and switch the AGM batteries to lithium which will increase my usable ah capacity even without the auxiliary battery. The current AGM setup is more than sufficient to operate 7+ days without any solar or other charging source.


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30 amps a day? My Isotherm 85 probably uses that amount. Am I missing something? Your system must have some insane efficiency tweaks.
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:24 AM   #54
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

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Originally Posted by kfo View Post
30 amps a day? My Isotherm 85 probably uses that amount. Am I missing something? Your system must have some insane efficiency tweaks.


30 amps is best case when the fridge remains closed all day. I did add 1” of poly-iso insulation on all sides except the door. I also have a secondary cooling fan on the backside.


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Old 09-09-2019, 01:01 AM   #55
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

I thought 2 6v 224 ah batteries in series produces 224 ah at 12v or in parallel 448 ah at 6v. Watthours has to be the same for either configuuration. 6 X 448 = 12 X 224

D
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Old 09-09-2019, 01:05 AM   #56
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

Gotcha 4 batteries.
Never mind.
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Old 09-16-2019, 04:58 PM   #57
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Default Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

BED PANELS

Initially I looked at using prefabricated aluminum bed panels from a number of suppliers. Overland Sprinters offered some excellent choices that were competitively priced. Overland also offered to custom size my panels to my dimensions. Because my panels were going to be unique dimensionally and in how they attached to the walls, I decided to fabricate them myself.

I actually had a spool gun and the proper welding gas for my MIG welder but had never used it with aluminum. I did get a quote from a local weld shop to do the welding if I cut and prepped all the aluminum. They wanted 8 hours to complete the work at $100/hr. For that price I decided I should at least make an attempt at welding the panels myself. All of the aluminum 1” x 0.125” aluminum tubing cost about $200. In the end all the welds were solid just not the prettiest.

My plan was to fabricate a total of 4 bed panels instead of the usual 3. I also wanted to shorten the width of the four panels from side to side. The reason for four panels was to make them lighter and easier to handle. I also planned to store the panels on the side walls when not in use. The smaller panels would fit two per wall. The narrower panels would also be less likely to bind against the walls when removing them. A friend had difficulty removing his bed panels because of the snug fit against the walls.

This picture compares the size of my bed panels with a friends Overland bed panel.



The side rails were fabricated from 2” angle with a 1” angle on top to retain the bed panels from the side. The rails are spaced 2” off each wall. The 1” angle adds another inch to the sidewall gap. I fabricated a total of four supports for each side rail. A total 12 5/16” rivnuts were used to attach the steel supports to the van sheet metal. I ended up using 4 rivnuts in the “D” pillar because the sheetmetal was so flimsy. The finished bed panels sit approximately 39-40” off the floor, enough room for most bikes with the front wheel removed.









The bed rails are also bolted to the supports for easy removal and installation. The edges of the bed rails, both top and side are covered with vinyl door edge guard material to minimize any metal to metal rattling. I had the bed rails powered coated once they were complete. Long term I might replace the steel bedrail with an aluminum version.



To determine the correct aluminum bed panel width I inserted some upholstered scrap wood panels between each of the rail supports to simulate the finished wall panels. This yielded a bed panel width of 62” x 19” for each of the four panels. Assembled the bed panels measure 62” wide x 76” long. There is a 1” gap at each end of the bed and a 3” gap on each side. So the sleeping area measures approximately 78” long x 68” wide. Perfect size for a queen sized 3” thick Temporpedic mattress topper which actually measured 78” in length. The side pockets are a great place for phones and water bottles.







I fabricated the rear most bed panel to take full advantage of the window indents. This adds another 3-4” in length. Rather than make holes for the side factory grab handles in my bed panels, I lowered the handles slightly and shortened them by 1” to utilize some existing holes for the rivnuts. The final wood panel profile followed the window indent. One last feature was the addition of aluminum interlocking 2” tabs on the bottom of the bed panels. This eliminates any movement between panels when climbing on the bed and helps to retain the bed panels over rough roads.









Each bed panel was covered with 1/2” prefinished birch ply. The panels were attached using countersunk machine screws from the bottom side. The panels are covered with a 1/8” landau foam and Marathon fabric.





All parts were removed to install the fabric covered wall panels. The supports bolt thru the wall panels and the rails bolt directly to the supports. I added some upholstered trim pieces to hide the supports and provide a location to mount the rear overhead cargo lighting.















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Last edited by gltrimble; 09-16-2019 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 09-21-2019, 03:12 PM   #58
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Default Re: Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

Great build! I used some aluminum ATV ramps ($150) which are temporally installed with wood braces, once I get the hight I want dialed-in I'll add steel or aluminum support rails,

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...4d1a644ce3848f

ATVbed.jpg
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Old 09-24-2019, 04:42 PM   #59
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Default Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

Quote:
Originally Posted by RVCuisineScene View Post
Great build! I used some aluminum ATV ramps ($150) which are temporally installed with wood braces, once I get the hight I want dialed-in I'll add steel or aluminum support rails.
]
I also looked at using the Harbor Freight ramps for my bed platform. Took a tape measure to the store for accurate measurements, but decided to go the custom route.



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Old 09-24-2019, 05:00 PM   #60
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Default Baby Shamu - 170 4x4

PLUMBING

My water system consists of a 46 gallon fresh water tank, an Isotemp Spa 15 liter water heater , and PEX plumbing feeding one indoor shower, one outdoor shower, and a 7” galley deep sink. The indoor shower and sink both drain to a 16 gallon gray water tank. I also have a Thetford Curve toilet.

I located the fresh water tank inside the van to avoid freezing. The tank sits in a “coffin” that makes up the lower half of my galley. My logic was to put the water tank on the lower half of the galley rather than storage compartments that would be difficult to access without getting on your hands and knees. The water tank also extends below my range/oven.



The coffin is fabricated from 3/4”pre-finished maple ply. The coffin extends over the slider step well. The floor was previously raised 1/2” and extended over this portion of the step well. This allowed me to locate the Shurflo pump in the step well void directly under the tank.







The 46 gallon tank is from Amazon. The dimensions were perfect for this application.

Class A Customs 46 Gallon Water Holding Tank NSF Approved T-4600 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007MSLP7A..._LVKIDbA9D41A5

The coffin interior was slightly wider than the tank. I lined the sides with 1/8” foam for a snug fit. All of the tank plumbing fittings were on the end where I had left approximately 3-4” of space to accommodate not only the water lines but also the drain and the propane. I installed an AC/DC heating pad in the bottom of the coffin just in case. The tank is wrapped in a plastic bag which drains to a tell-tale opening in the bottom should a leak ever occur.

I filled the tank with wiffle balls to minimize any sloshing of the water. Later I located food grade wiffle balls.













The Shurflo pump is mounted to a 1/4” thick aluminum plate which allows me to easily remove and service the pump when needed. The pump output penetrates the step well wall as does the propane, drain, and both hot and cold water. Each penetration has a rubber grommet for a snug fit. A bulkhead fitting was used for the 3/4” sink drain. A simple toilet angle valve is located upstream of the pump inlet. This allows me to isolate or drain the plumbing system without draining the entire water tank. The wiring feeds the pump and a level gauge. The propane line feeds my Force 10 range/oven from the driver’s side propane tank.











The 1.25” tank gravity fill and 1/2” vent line terminate at the upper galley cabinet. I added an 8” access port to the top of the tank. This port is easily accessible by removing the lower galley drawer.







The upper portion of the galley cabinet containing the sink and drawers is attached to the lower cabinet. The upper half is basically modular and can be removed if needed. All the rigid plumbing remains attached to the lower cabinet structure.

To minimize the weight the upper cabinet is frame and panel construction. The frame consists of 3/4” maple and the panels are 1/4 pre-finished maple ply. The recesses created by the 1/4” ply allow me to add future flip down/up table tops.













PEX plumbing extends to the rear of the van for the outside shower. PEX also extends to the driver’s side where it ties into the hot water heater and the indoor shower. All of the exterior PEX was wrapped with electric heat tracing, aluminum foil, and finally foam pipe wrap for freeze protection.





Easy Heat AHB-118 Cold Weather Valve and Pipe Heating Cable, 18-Feet https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00002N96H..._kILIDbG5WWG5K

The Isotemp Spa water heater is located on the lower driver’s side directly behind my Factory Espar D5 heater. The fresh water is heated by the engine coolant lines the majority of the time. The engine can heat the fresh water to 180-200F. I can also use the Espar to heat the water to about 130 before the Espar shuts down. The Isotemp electric heating element is capable of reaching 165F. A mixing valve limits the discharge water to 140F. I previously detailed some mods I did to the engine coolant lines to accelerate the heating of the fresh water. A digital gauge provides the hot water temperature.





Both the indoor and outdoor shower use an Ambassador mixer valve. This is an amazing valve combing both temperature and volume control in a very small format. The 3/4” quick disconnect on each shower valve feeds a simple Camco hand shower wand with on/off controls. The quick disconnects are from usplastics.com. I will provide more detail regarding the shower in a future post.





Ambassador Marine Aidack Hot/Cold Shut Off Valve/Mixer, Chrome https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TIAJ0YA..._Z3LIDb364N1VZ

The gray water tank is a 16 gallon poly tank that fits between the rear differential and the spare tire on my 170 van. Both the sink and indoor shower gravity drain thru small Camco traps to the gray water tank via a combination of 3/4” and 1” flexible hose. I installed both a 1.5 “ and 3/4” drain on the gray water tank. The 3/4” drain has a motorized stainless ball valve while the larger drain is a standard RV style slide valve.

The tank has an access port on top for cleaning. The tank is secured using four threaded knobs and all-thread allowing for easy removal. A level gauge feeds my See Level tank level monitor.









Akent Motorized Ball Valve 3/4" Stainless Steel Ball Valve with Full Port, 9-24V DC and 2 Wire Auto Return Setup CR-04(3/4") https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06ZZ9P9G4..._Y2LIDb8ZWCNJ8

Valterra 7103 ABS Gate Valve, Black, 1-1/2" Spig https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B95PVGS..._v3LIDb7YM7R3Z





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Last edited by gltrimble; 09-24-2019 at 06:45 PM.
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