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Old 12-14-2015, 10:07 PM   #11
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Here's something interesting: this bearing is "shielded", not "sealed". Here's what VXB, the company selling the bearing on Amazon, has to say about that:

"Sealed bearings are lubricated with oil or grease in the bearing factory, while open and shielded bearings are meant to be lubricated in place, with periodic reapplication of lubrication, based on use." EDIT: which is wrong; see AP's post below!

So the next question is, once this is all back together, how to safely remove the plastic blower from the motor to access the screws and take out the motor and grease the bearing? Had I done that when I was fixing the heater booster, I might not have had this problem.
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Old 12-15-2015, 01:27 AM   #12
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Quote:
Originally Posted by seans View Post
Here's something interesting: this bearing is "shielded", not "sealed". Here's what VXB, the company selling the bearing on Amazon, has to say about that:

"Sealed bearings are lubricated with oil or grease in the bearing factory, while open and shielded bearings are meant to be lubricated in place, with periodic reapplication of lubrication, based on use."

So the next question is, once this is all back together, how to safely remove the plastic blower from the motor to access the screws and take out the motor and grease the bearing? Had I done that when I was fixing the heater booster, I might not have had this problem.
Bullsh*t.

Shielded bearings are lubed at the factory and in "normal" service are lubricated for the life of the bearing.

Just how do they expect you to get the lubrication into the bearing with the shields in place? Good luck with that!

The 624ZZ bearing number you mentioned...
The "ZZ" denotes a double shield or shielded both sides. A single letter would denote shielded one side for grease-able installations. We ordered double shielded bearings for the motor shop bearing shelf stock.

When the motor didn't have grease fittings the double shielded bearings were installed as they come (with both shields in place).

When the motor bell housing had grease fittings one shield would be carefully removed so as to not damage the bearing balls. The bearing was then installed with the non shielded side positioned to allow the grease to flood into bearing and lube it. The one, opposite side shield would be left in place to contain the grease and keep it from going where you didn't want it (to keep it from leaking out).

Want to know what happens when a motor repairman forgot to remove the one shield? The field machine service person would try to force grease into the fitting, but the shield won't let it go into the bearing. Pressure from the grease gun would bear against shield, deform it against the balls, and then the balls would overheat from the friction of the balls against the shield. Early bearing failure was the result.

Install your double shielded bearing and don't worry about lubing it ever.

vic
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Old 12-15-2015, 03:29 PM   #13
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Thank you for that great info and example, Vic!

So I've been thinking about reassembly and how to get the fan off the motor next time. Do you have any ideas?
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Old 12-16-2015, 02:20 AM   #14
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

I have no great ideas.

As I recall the clearances on the plastic fan unit are too close and the plastic fan too flimsy to allow pry tools to get in without damage.

Maybe dis-assembly as you did and then pulling the fan against the bell housing using the motor rotor will give even enough pressure to release the grip of the fan on the shaft without damage to the fan itself.

vic
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Old 12-19-2015, 09:43 PM   #15
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Default Rebuilding the blower motor

Got my heater booster blower motor working again for <$2, saving $150+...

motor_parts.jpg

I was able to grind off the old bearing with a dremel, and then pressing only the inner race, got a new bearing installed. I tested the motor with no load with a variable power supply that displays current. This was really good, because I found that the current went up substantially when I buttoned everything up, because I needed to press the bearing on a little more.

pressing-on-bearing.JPG

Above: pressing the bearing on. I did not want to put pressure on the outer race, so I slid a washer over the motor shaft that contacted the inner race but was too small to contact the outer race. To press on the washer, I found a tool with a hole in the center large enough to fit over the shaft, but small enough to mate to the washer. (That would be an anti-fouling spark plug adapter from the miscellaneous tools drawer, which is a hack from the 70s (earlier?) that screws onto a spark plug and then screws into the engine block to prevent a spark plug from fouling when there's an oil problem in an engine, by keeping the plug out of the cylinder - obviously not a great solution!) I pressed it together easily in a vise.

The reading on the micrometer is about 0.8 mm too large for what the distance between the bearings should be.

This was the second attempt to press on the bearing. I forgot to put the brush assembly on first before I pressed it on the first time. I thought I'd have to grind off the new bearing but I had not pressed the bearing all the way on and was able to get a tool under the inner race to remove it safely.

For pulling the fan off next time, I will fabricate a set of shims that are thin enough to slide under the fan, with a 10mm slot so that they can go around the shaft. Then I will slide in additional shims to gradually press the fan off the shaft (hopefully.)

blower_fan_shaft_width.JPG

I put the motor and fan back on the heater booster and ran it up to speed. Sounds great! As you can see, the motor started spinning with as little as one-half volt, so all is good!

heater_booster_anim.gif

Our local makerspace has a nice garage to put it back together.

makerspace.jpg

NOTE: to get the motor pins out of the connector, I inserted a small paper clip on either side of the connector to push down the hidden retaining tabs on the connector. When reinstalling, I had to pry the tabs back up a little with pliers. I noted which wire went into which connector hole to avoid having the fan run backward after reassembly (that would be REALLY bad).
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Old 12-21-2015, 02:34 PM   #16
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Nicely done!
I am interested in your controller build. Have you thought of sharing the build or making it an open source project?
This will give you even more points in the Sprinter legend status.

In addition to the extended run time for the coolant pump, can you extend the time the blower motor runs after shut down? What I have noticed with mine is the insulation for the two sensors on the water jacket break down, most likely from the high heat cycles. Anything to remove the excess heat after shutdown would help.
Thanks.

Bruce
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Old 12-21-2015, 09:09 PM   #17
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Quote:
Originally Posted by bc339 View Post
I am interested in your controller build. Have you thought of sharing the build or making it an open source project?
Thank you for the compliment. Yes, I have thought about this, and yes, it would be a GREAT project. If an attorney could ease my concerns about liability, I'd gladly share the source code and plans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bc339 View Post
In addition to the extended run time for the coolant pump, can you extend the time the blower motor runs after shut down? What I have noticed with mine is the insulation for the two sensors on the water jacket break down, most likely from the high heat cycles. Anything to remove the excess heat after shutdown would help.
I'm not aware of a way to do that. I am thinking about sensing when the heater enters and leaves high output mode (by looking at changes to coolant temperature or placing temperature sensors on the exhaust pipe and/or water jacket) and have a delayed shutdown which waits until the heater has been in low output mode for a minute, so that the thermal shock on shutdown is lessened. I recently noticed that the blower in my heater booster ran 90 seconds after shutdown, so I will probably make the circulation pump run that long. At some point I will monitor the current consumed by the heater booster and cut the circulation pump when the current drops indicating shut off of the blower.
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Old 01-02-2016, 10:41 AM   #18
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Default Re: Rebuilding my heater booster

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Puttana View Post
Bullsh*t.

Shielded bearings are lubed at the factory and in "normal" service are lubricated for the life of the bearing.

Just how do they expect you to get the lubrication into the bearing with the shields in place? Good luck with that!

When the motor bell housing had grease fittings one shield would be carefully removed so as
Install your double shielded bearing and don't worry about lubing it ever.

vic
Some of the older shielded bearings had shields made of a somewhat flexible plastic material rather than thin metal, with this type of shield, I was able to gently lift an edge of the shield and add grease using a syringe with a metal hollow needle. The replacement bearings shown in this thread have metal shields, so this technique won"t work here.

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Old 01-02-2016, 10:57 AM   #19
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Default Re: My heater booster adventures

Quote:
Originally Posted by seans View Post
I ground the bearing off carefully using a rotary tool with a grinding bit.

Attachment 72225
I imagine that you must not have had a small puller or an arbor press available to remove the inner race of the failed bearing. It would have been relatively easy, using either on of these tools. I am also wondering if you removed all the abrasive particles and conductive metal dust, generated from the grinding process, from the motor armature and commutator before reassembling the motor?
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Old 01-16-2016, 05:33 AM   #20
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Default Re: My heater booster adventures

Quote:
Originally Posted by psuggmog View Post
I imagine that you must not have had a small puller or an arbor press available to remove the inner race of the failed bearing. It would have been relatively easy, using either on of these tools. I am also wondering if you removed all the abrasive particles and conductive metal dust, generated from the grinding process, from the motor armature and commutator before reassembling the motor?
These are great tips for someone who is rebuilding their motor. There was little room to get anything in. I will have to look into pullers next time. There was not much dust generated. I did clean things off with a rag, and it was much cleaner afterward than when I started, but it would have been better if I'd blown it out. I did not have a puller. I cut the bearing very carefully. I did not cut into the shaft, but used a vise grips. With its force, the thin bit of metal still remaining failed, allowing me to slide the bearing off.
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