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armchair
12-12-2008, 06:56 AM
I loved my 04 Sprinter until it hit 80K. All of the injectors needed replacement. 3 days at the dealer for that one. Transmission failure left me stranded on a job, working out of a rental for a week while they repaired it, at 84K. At the same time I spent $1500 on non warranty items like power door locks, rear door latch, etc etc. At 85K the calipers required replacement-not under the DC extended warranty, along with pads and rotors, for $1500. Now with just a few more miles on it, the trans failed again, can't wait to have it towed to the dealer again to be jerked around, arguing about warranty coverage, having to work out of either my car or a rented van that DC surely won't pay for. The design of the van is great but I think the days of a Mercedes lasting 200K or better are long long gone. My first work van was a '73 VW Van-a far smaller truck but one that I carried the same load in, never had these kinds of probs with TRIPLE the mileage on it! Not sure what to do-my previous full size Chevy wasn't much more reliable, although it was cheaper to fix and the dealer service was much much better, but they and the full size Fords are soooo outdated. Are the new Sprinters just as French like in reliability? Maybe it's time to consider the GM/Isuzu W series cab overs! This Sprinter is killing my business.

Altered Sprinter
12-12-2008, 08:18 AM
armchair: you may like to read this Come See My Motor (http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4991)
DC does not have anything to do with Chrysler nowadays.
Hunt about the forum in search you may learn a few preventative tricks for longevity.
Richard.

talkinghorse43
12-12-2008, 03:45 PM
I loved my 04 Sprinter until it hit 80K. All of the injectors needed replacement. 3 days at the dealer for that one. Transmission failure left me stranded on a job, working out of a rental for a week while they repaired it, at 84K. At the same time I spent $1500 on non warranty items like power door locks, rear door latch, etc etc. At 85K the calipers required replacement-not under the DC extended warranty, along with pads and rotors, for $1500. Now with just a few more miles on it, the trans failed again, can't wait to have it towed to the dealer again to be jerked around, arguing about warranty coverage, having to work out of either my car or a rented van that DC surely won't pay for. The design of the van is great but I think the days of a Mercedes lasting 200K or better are long long gone. My first work van was a '73 VW Van-a far smaller truck but one that I carried the same load in, never had these kinds of probs with TRIPLE the mileage on it! Not sure what to do-my previous full size Chevy wasn't much more reliable, although it was cheaper to fix and the dealer service was much much better, but they and the full size Fords are soooo outdated. Are the new Sprinters just as French like in reliability? Maybe it's time to consider the GM/Isuzu W series cab overs! This Sprinter is killing my business.

Sounds like you have an arms-length relationship with your Sprinter. Seems to me my '02 requires a closer relationship than that. I have to get in there and get my hands dirty to have a successful relationship. Seems the Sprinter can be reliable and economical, if well taken care of. If you rely on the dealer to care for your Sprinter, you're likely to be disappointed with high repair costs and paying for repairs that may not really have been necessary. Like Altered, I recommend paying more personal attention to the condition and needs of your Sprinter.

Randall
03-25-2009, 04:58 AM
I got to say there is not much empathy for this guy. The point is, being self employed myself, you don't have time to do all of that, coddling your vehicle at every turn. If you pay good money for something, it should last. Last time I looked, the sprinter is not a cheap vehicle - so there is an expectation. To me, there should be no problems of any consequence for at least 100K +. saying you can't rely on the dealer - who you are paying, is hogwash as well. It's sad that that may be true, but not for the reasons I think your intimating. 80K is nothing and the vehicle shouldn't be falling apart at that stage. I assume the basic maintenance has been done..sorry, these sound like fanboy answers...I'm about to buy a sprinter and am a little concerned of course on the reliability.Time will tell

sorry to hear your having trouble, without wheels you loose money big time !

rlent
03-25-2009, 07:01 AM
Sounds like you have an arms-length relationship with your Sprinter.
That was my first thought.

Seems to me my '02 requires a closer relationship than that. I have to get in there and get my hands dirty to have a successful relationship.
I know my '06 does.

Seems the Sprinter can be reliable and economical, if well taken care of.
That has been my experience. At somewhere around 100K to 115K miles I went thru and calculated my maintenance and repair costs in response to a poster (who was not a Sprinter owner - but nevertheless considered himself the voice of authority on the matter) on another site who was claiming Sprinters were extremely expensive and prone to all kinds of expensive problems - IIRC, my maintenance & repair cost per mile was around $ .01 per mile or less - that included everything I could categorize as normal maintenance, and repairs (there were no repairs at that point - except for maybe a few lightbulbs - that were not covered under warranty) - the total did not include accessories and add-on's.

At 123K miles my per mile cost roughly doubled - as I had to replace my tires and have a front-end alignment done (roughly $800 for a set of four Michelins and the alignment)

At $.02 per mile it sure seems relatively cheap to me .....

If you rely on the dealer to care for your Sprinter, you're likely to be disappointed with high repair costs and paying for repairs that may not really have been necessary.
It's funny how things have changed (well, maybe not ....) I grew up in the automotive aftermarket .... my father had been a mechanic all his life, and eventually owned a small chain of auto parts stores. Back then almost everyone (the regular bluecollar folks anyways) worked on their vehicles and did normal routine maintenance, and often many repairs - some of them fairly technical - very few folks took their cars into dealers. These days that has changed - probably largely due to the increasing technical complexity and the specialized equipment required in some instances for servicing, and perhaps to some degree lack of freely available time.

It is still possible to do much of the work yourself - in my mind, one thing is for sure: the more intimately familiar one is with their vehicle, the better off things are likely to go. But it is an individual choice, as far as how far one wants to immerse themselves .... there's little doubt that it does require an investment of one's self.