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View Full Version : Looking at a 2007 sprinter need advise


Flatheadfever
05-19-2016, 11:39 PM
I found a 07 sprinter with about 330000 kilometres on it.
I want to make a bare basic camper out of it.
It has been sitting for about a year or more with the intakes off and another set of used intakes. The body is okay for a eastcoast van. The intakes where pulled due to loss of power and gummed up swirl valves I guess. Not sure why it still apart although the owner is hard up for cash as his business went tits up.
I was told I could have it for $3500 and I put it back together.

I really would like to have a 2006 or early 118" tall van which is near impossible to find in the 6-10 k range.

After sitting this long would this one be a can of worms or is it a good deal?
What do I need to look at inside the intakes to see if they are okay?
Thanks

Rob S
05-20-2016, 02:49 AM
Have not seen one of these apart, but the swirl valves must move freely, and the plastic linkages must be in good condition.

Was it clean and well covered to prevent contamination getting into the cylinders?

I'd be tempted to put it together first and see if it runs, and then pay the money if it does. Use proper gaskets, and new bolts, and exact torque specs.

If so it might be a good deal, no DEF system to worry about, swirl and egr can be cured with a GDE tune. Engine itself is pretty reliable.

At 330 K you might probably also need a new DPF, about 1500 or so. Transmission is also expensive if it has any issues.

Flatheadfever
05-20-2016, 08:48 AM
I think he sent the DPF out to be cleaned if that makes sense.
If I can get it running with some help hopefully I won't lose money.
I noticed the linkage was broken on one of the intakes.

Flatheadfever
05-20-2016, 09:13 AM
I could use some advise from somebody on the basic steps for assembling the intakes. I didn't take it apart so it would be nice to figure the proper sequence.

lindenengineering
05-20-2016, 12:22 PM
Obviously prep the faces.
Taking the fuel filter strap as a holding tool & use it to join the two manifolds together. Take special care to make sure the operating linkage is properly connected. Make sure it is all free to move the butterfly sets.

Invert them and fit the gaskets to the manifolds holding them in place with the tangs provided.

You will note that there is a cooling system connector spool like tube sealed by O rings. BUY/INSTALL A NEW ONE!

I ALWAYS install a new one by carefully inserting it into one half then the other, making sure you don't rupture the rings and this is MUST DO! Always sit the tube "square" into stubs of the manifolds----read very important!
If you have never done this before I recommend once you have the manifolds together on the bench right side up! Cut a thin strip of steel, drill two holes in in so that it picks up on some of the threaded manifold bosses at the rear of the set . This will keep it all rigid as you offer it in a wiggling fashion into place. Have several of the long bolts slipped into place to engage with the head & to act as guides once the set is basically seated in place. Now simply engage all the other bolts and torque down using a small torque wrench snugging them down very evenly & gradually to avoid distortion.

The you are done ready for the next assembly step.
All the best
Dennis
Mechanic

Bobnoxious
05-20-2016, 04:30 PM
Fan a $2,000 wad of twenties (the bulk of a wad of twenties looks more impressive then hundreds) in his face and see if he counters.

Bacho
05-20-2016, 04:39 PM
$3,500 seems like a pretty good price to me. When I was shopping for one, the non-runners brought 4-5k at auction.

Bobnoxious
05-20-2016, 04:54 PM
If you feel good about the asking price that's what ultimately matters.

I always try to get the lowest price possible. Especially if if the seller is in dire straights and needs cash (cash is king). Take advantage of his unfortunate situation. There is nothing wrong with this, morally or ethically, it's called capitalism and doing business.

If your conscience tells you otherwise, pay him his asking price and vote for Bernie Sanders.

Bob

Flatheadfever
05-20-2016, 06:17 PM
The van is sitting in an open lot doors unlocked for a year with the parts in the back. A little worried parts might be missing but they look to be all there.
I think he still owes the shop money.

Bobnoxious
05-20-2016, 06:19 PM
Make certain there are no mechanic's lien against the vehicle.

Flatheadfever
05-21-2016, 02:41 AM
I looked at again and the mechanic came over and showed me the extra intakes which must be from a later year as they are not the same. Both have the plastic arms broken. Said it has broken bolts as well. Been sitting for 18 months.
I think I'll pass on this one and look for a 2006 118" tall van.

lindenengineering
05-21-2016, 02:59 AM
Well I would buy it for that money!
Now I have never seen a 906 V6 engine past 450,000 YET!
Being "Wun Time Wunders", they have usually gone bang by that mileage!

The manifold set is about $1100 the pair and come with the swirl valve actuator! Add about $150 in gaskets etc and its a runner!

For a total layout of say $5000 you are as they say in the UK "quids in"!
Worth looking at for that money.
Dennis
Mechanic

Rob S
05-21-2016, 04:34 AM
Dennis the OP spoke of 330,000 kms = 206,250 miles

When you mentioned 450,000 were you speaking of miles there?

That would mean it's only half done....

lindenengineering
05-21-2016, 05:50 AM
Dennis the OP spoke of 330,000 kms = 206,250 miles

When you mentioned 450,000 were you speaking of miles there?

That would mean it's only half done....

Yes miles !
Dennis

sleeper bird
05-21-2016, 11:02 AM
At 450,000 miles thats pretty good service ,to me anyway.Im going to try to break that record.I hope.

lindenengineering
05-21-2016, 01:27 PM
Yes but the old T1Nney 5 bangers just keep rolling on!
I have seen some of those with 800,000 miles on them and still going strong!

A van which is easy to fix although I confess I read enough horror stories on these forums; often that is to suggest the opposite !!

These engines are so well engineered to machine a block back to as "new serviceable" is not too difficult. Sadly the V6's are not that versatile and I dub them Woolworth diesels.
Then that is the trend these days; "One Tyme Wunders", and if you are in this business you will see the slow demise of engine machine shops, as owners of my age retire or lack of business cause diversification.
An article in a recent trade magazine even suggests engine machine shop focus in on old Brit iron motorcycles, which it apparently has no shortage of people fettling engines it seems.

Digressing a bit to the "zenith of chuck in the bin" (trash it) is the UK!
With a rapidly diminishing machine shop availability my brother who has a shop either chucks it in the bin or sends it to India where very competent machinists will bring back the Kharma!

Its called "de-skilling" and we are getting close to the throw away vehicle!
Speaking comically, you simple remove the fuel cap (emission regs allowed of course ) drive up your replacement, fit the cap! An easy DIY repair even for cubicle bound key tappers who use hand creme & "Georgio" and drive off!

A whole new experience in certified and qualified repair techniques!:bounce:
One day I bet MB will even issue a certificate for it--qualified to fit fuel caps! FFS
A capital accolade!

On a slightly different note I see recently that one local MB dealer has tried to boost profits I suppose by suggesting everything needs a new transmission at $8500 a pop!
When in fact a service and a speed sensor would do the trick!
But then they would actually have to repair something and that is where the skill come in with experience course! Something by the way that scanner can't do yet--repair it!
Begs the question how did that Dealer Tech get his credentials to repair a Sprinter???? --Sears?
Their techs simply throw away Samsungs 'cos they can't fix em!

Keep on driving into the sunset keep calm and carry on !:thumbup:
Dennis
Mechanic

Aqua Puttana
05-21-2016, 02:00 PM
...
I think I'll pass on this one and look for a 2006 118" tall van.
You may more easily find hen's teeth.

The turning radius of the Sprinter makes a 140 WB very nice to drive, even in parking lots. Including 140's in your search will open many more possibilities in the used market.

Happy hunting. vic

Bobnoxious
05-21-2016, 05:06 PM
...and we are getting close to the throw away vehicle!

Brother Dennis, It's already arrived, it's called the Sprinter! I call them 'Bic Lighter' cars:lol::lol::lol: When my Sprinter goes kaput, I'll jury-rig it enough to enter it in the local Demolition Derby!!!


Bob

Bobnoxious
05-21-2016, 05:50 PM
Hey Flatheadfever:
Next time you look at a contender, post a few pictures?

Thanks,
Bob

Flatheadfever
05-21-2016, 07:21 PM
I have some pictures I can post.
The original intakes don't look that bad. I think they cleaned them up enough for the swirl valves to move. Will an ultra sonic cleaner clean the deposits?
There must be a way to fix the arms. I could see whittling some out of aluminum and bolting them together.(if you could attach them to the pivots)
It seems crazy to toss intakes because of the plastic arms are toast?
Am I missing something here?
Why are the intake not refurbished?

3500 cad is about 2700USD
but 1250USD is 1650CAD

Bobnoxious
05-21-2016, 07:50 PM
On a slightly different note I see recently that one local MB dealer has tried to boost profits I suppose by suggesting everything needs a new transmission at $8500 a pop!

Big Brother Dennis:

One can only wonder how many people get screwed by unscrupulous automotive repair facilities?

My first and best German car was a 1968 Type 1, I bought for $900 and drove for 10-years. My only complaint, it didn't have air-conditioning.

In my opinion, the type 1 was, still is, a German engineering masterpiece. Simple design continuously improved, easy to repair not requiring expensive electronic diagnostic do dads, parts cheap and plentiful. I think they manufactured about 18 to 20,000,000 of them? It's only engineering rival, the venerable Ford model 8N tractor.

The Bug had many problems when I bought it. But nothing I couldn't learn to fix. For example, The engine began making a noise and had lost some of its 50 some-odd horsepower.

Being a stupid teenager and not knowing any better, I took it to the local VW dealership. The service manager, a cherubic, baldheaded guy chopping on a saliva soaked Montechristo came out to take a look. I think his name was Vic. :lol:

Anyway, fatso shoehorned his gelatinous patootie into the car, started the engine, revved it a few times while appearing to intently listen. "You need a valve job."He exclaimed. I was frozen awe! This person was so knowledgeable about cars, he could diagnose problems by just listening. Wow! someday I hoped I could acquire such skill, I thought to myself. When he explained the valve job would cost $250. My young heart skipped a beat. It might as well have been $2,500 because I didn't have the money.

Later, I don't remember how I stumbled upon it, but I found this book titled, "How to keep your Volkswagen alive and well" authored by some guy with a parrot on his shoulder. In the book, he describes the exact same sound my engine was making and claimed it was the result of loose heads, a common quirk for Type1's, that only needed to be re-torqued.

Subsequently, I bought a $20 Craftsman beam style torque wrench, I still have today, 40-years later, and never used since. Well, I think I have used it a couple of times. I Followed his instructions in the book and viola, problem solved! Not only did I learn how to re-torque head bolts but I also learned not to trust people when it comes to fixing my cars. Especially, fat, baldheaded curmudgeons salivating on cigars.

In fact, the past 40-years, other than for recalls, I have only taken my cars to the dealer once and that was for an oil change I was too pressed for time to do myself. Even then, before I left, I popped the hood to discover they had slopped oil all over the filler cap area/valve cover and neglected re-attach the air filter cover. I can tell you, I made that service writer feel like a piece of dookie! Well, at least I hope I did.

Stay hydrated!

Bob
FAA A&P
Mechanic. (Licensed to kill):lol:

Flatheadfever
05-21-2016, 09:16 PM
The mechanic told me there was 3 or 4 broken bolts as well.
I saw one on the turbo that looked like an easy fix.
Where might the others be?
We have a real rust problem in Nova Scotia since you cannot get any farther that 30 miles from salt water. It is in the air all the time.
Where is the best place to purchase intakes and gaskets price wise?

Bobnoxious
05-21-2016, 09:30 PM
I have some pictures I can post.
The original intakes don't look that bad. I think they cleaned them up enough for the swirl valves to move. Will an ultra sonic cleaner clean the deposits?
There must be a way to fix the arms. I could see whittling some out of aluminum and bolting them together.(if you could attach them to the pivots)
It seems crazy to toss intakes because of the plastic arms are toast?
Am I missing something here?
Why are the intake not refurbished?

3500 cad is about 2700USD
but 1250USD is 1650CAD

Will an ultra sonic cleaner clean the deposits?

Greetings Flatheadfever:

I have a small commercial ultrasonic cleaner and it works great! I use it to clean small carburetors for chainsaws and Weed Whackers. Make certain whatever solution you use isn't corrosive to aluminum.

It seems crazy to toss intakes because of the plastic arms are toast?
Am I missing something here?

Plastic arms! It Figures!

Crazy to you and I, the lowly consumer!!! But not elitist, greedy corporate bean counters who's only interest is increasing the corporation's bottom line by manufacturing inexpensive, less durable and reliable components.

I am not shy to admit, I am not knowledgeable about the Sprinter's intake manifolds design. In fact, I have never seen one.

However, it doesn't require one to be a member of Mensa to conclude plastic is not the material of choice for components, such as, intake manifold plastic arms that will be exposed to high temperatures for long duration.

Some on this forum have argued that plastic is better than metal. For certain applications, I agree but for components exposed to high temperature extremes, Such as engines/ transmissions, I totally disagree! When it comes to engine components, I say leave plastic for Barbie dolls and G.I. Joe's

Why are the intake not refurbished?

Not long after World War II, industrial societies transitioned from a craftsmanship culture to the consumer, disposable culture. Again, a corporate scheme to increase profits. To sum it up, corporate greed at the expense of the consumer. German engineers have perfected this to the extreme l!!

Let me share a small example, in the picture is an electric skillet that belong to my grandmother. I believe it to be manufactured in the late 50s early 60s. Please notice there is no plastic Teflon coating as I refuse to consume food cooked on something called Polytetrafluoroethylene!!! Plastic!. Yummy yum yum! The same goes for Frankenfoods i.e. GMO's.
76588
Also, let me share this electrical appliance has functioned flawlessly for over 50 years and, I am confident, if handled with care, will continue to do so for the next 50!

Ha ha ha corporate America!!!

Stay hydrated brother!

BOBNOXIOUS
Irritating people since the dawn of humanity!

Rob S
05-21-2016, 10:21 PM
Bob, I know this may be taboo in some or most neighborhoods, but all ya have to do is peek over the fence of most any suburban family yard, and you will see that the kids are being trained in the conspicuous and excessive consumption of throwaway disposable plastic, made in China, and marketed with the ultimate amount of hype, from a very early age.

It is scary! You might think fuel consumption is an issue, but the amount of crude used in the manufacture and distribution of kids toys is positively out of this world.

It is always a bit of a thrill for me when I manage to figure out how to disassemble and fix something better than new which was clearly designed to fail at an early age, just after the exclusive warranty expires, and be replaced with a newer more fail-certain model.


Ha ha ha corporate America!!!

Bobnoxious
05-21-2016, 11:59 PM
It is always a bit of a thrill for me when I manage to figure out how to disassemble and fix something better than new which was clearly designed to fail at an early age, just after the exclusive warranty expires, and be replaced with a newer more fail-certain model.

Yes, I too share in the thrill of repairing something not meant to be repaired. For example, my computer monitor started acting up. Googled or YouTubed, can't remember which, the model number and discovered someone had figured out what the problem was, provided the part number, a tiny capacitor, and source to purchase. The shipping was more expensive than the part! Located and desoldered the defective one and installed the new one. Viola! It worked and I felt like a genius. The feeling, priceless! In fact, five years later it's still working. $200+ monitor repaired for less than $10 Bucks!

Same for the family paper shredder. My lovely Wife insists on shredding telephone books, telephone poles, tree branches and whatever, until one day it took a dump. Took it apart and found it stripped a couple of cogs off one of the gears. TIGed some new teeth on, a little bit of precision Dremmel grinding using my Optivisior and viola! Still in use today. I was fortunate the gears weren't made from plastic!

Stay hydrated buddy!

Bobnoxious
Irritating the ignorant since the dawn of humanity!!!

Bobnoxious
05-22-2016, 12:51 AM
It is scary! You might think fuel consumption is an issue, but the amount of crude used in the manufacture and distribution of kids toys is positively out of this world.


it's sad, where will it all end?

Rob S
05-22-2016, 01:08 AM
To the OP, we apologize for the hijacking of your topic, and the distinct lack of relevant advice in these recent posts...

Only maybe watch out for aged plastic parts, as expounded on by Bob elsewhere on this forum.

Bobnoxious
05-22-2016, 02:24 AM
My apologies too Flatheadfever!

Rob S
05-23-2016, 01:13 AM
Well I would buy it for that money!
Now I have never seen a 906 V6 engine past 450,000 YET!
Being "Wun Time Wunders", they have usually gone bang by that mileage!

T
Dennis
Mechanic

Dennis, you may have to revise your thinking. This guy has a problem because the odo won't go past 999,999

lindenengineering
05-23-2016, 02:29 AM
He may have had several engines in it before the bloody thing went phutt!
Beside they have to make one good 'un every so often!

Remember! They make bloody thousands of them annually !
So the law of averages states that one or two will go the distance before going bang!

The benchmark for longevity of course is Cummins!
No-one comes close--(Made in USA too!)

Cummins engines made for (EEJITS ) Irish for idiots to operate with successful outcomes!:thumbup::lol:
Dennis
Mechpanic

Bobnoxious
05-23-2016, 02:40 AM
Eureka! Replace me plastic, Woolworth/Bic lighter ingun with a Cummings! Pure genius Dennis!