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andrewblanejr
05-13-2016, 08:47 PM
Hi guys,

I'm about to rent a Sprinter from Ryder for the day and use an Artec Eva scanner to produce a 3D CAD model of the high roof 170wb (non-ext) model. Before I go through that much trouble I wanted to confirm that nobody has any better way to get CAD files of this van, right? I've talked to mechanical engineers with SEMA subscriptions and they can't find Sprinter models in that database and I've scoured the internet but not found any models that would have undercarriage detail or detail showing the corrugations in the sheet metal and placement of ribs/pillars. So...I guess if i want an accurate CAD model...I'll have to generate it myself...right?

Andy in NH
05-13-2016, 08:59 PM
On the road and had not bookmarked it, but did you check the sprinter upfitter site? Thought they had some detailed vector files (for a fee).

andrewblanejr
05-13-2016, 09:04 PM
On the road and had not bookmarked it, but did you check the sprinter upfitter site? Thought they had some detailed vector files (for a fee).

They have nice 2d vector drawings on the van from overhead or the side. I can't find anything: 1) 3D, 2) that details the undercarriage, or 3) that shows the corrugations, ribs, pillars in the wall.

Graphite Dave
05-13-2016, 10:00 PM
Do you really need a 3D file for a conversion? Maybe if you were going in the business of multiple conversions. With just one conversion 3D is probably not needed.

I used a simple 2D program and that worked out very well. Everything fit as expected.

andrewblanejr
05-13-2016, 10:23 PM
Hi Graphite Dave,

I love your build posts, SUPER HELPFUL.

One reason for 3D CAD models is to try to CNC foam panels that fit the grooves/ribs perfectly. Another reason is that i want to get an accurate sense of how much space i have UNDER the van to work with.

Graphite Dave
05-14-2016, 12:52 AM
Hi Graphite Dave,

I love your build posts, SUPER HELPFUL.

One reason for 3D CAD models is to try to CNC foam panels that fit the grooves/ribs perfectly. Another reason is that i want to get an accurate sense of how much space i have UNDER the van to work with.

Some more info on the Transit build: http://www.ortontransit.info/

There is a list there of 100 things I am changing/improving from the Sprinter. Same basic design/layout because it worked so well in the Sprinter.

phil4nugen
06-22-2017, 05:58 PM
Andrew,
Have you made any progress on a 3D model of a new Sprinter? I have searched and downloaded what I could find and it is crap. I would be willing to pay for accurate geometry of the interior if available (or share the cost of scanning if required) I am looking to do a 170" 3500 LB 4WD conversion and want to fully model it before I start. I have SolidWorks design and NC fabrication resources available to me so accurate geometry will make it much easier to do a quality job. Fully modeling the build will take some time but will prevent a lot of costly errors / rework.
Please let me know how you have made out.
Thanks

Eka
06-23-2017, 01:13 AM
I'm also looking for accurate 3D CAD files. I'm likely more interested in an extended 170" high roof 4x4, but I'm not settled on which Sprinter to start with.

To me the undercarriage area is critical. I'm looking to put as many heavy items as possible down below. Stuff like an Espar coolant heater, insulated tanks and batteries. I want to get a good idea as to how much room is really available. I also want to keep my additions from interfering with maintenance. I also want to keep the Sprinter balanced from side to side, and with appropriate front to rear loading ratio.

I've also noticed the lower walls are thicker than I thought. That opens up the possibility of placing fore/aft utility runs in them instead of under the floor. That may change where I place things like the inverter/charger. Access to the wall is then more important.

vantastic adventure
07-09-2017, 12:13 AM
Add me to the looking-for-CAD files list.

Note for others that stumble upon this thread: check my profile for a solution. I'll scan, purchase, or otherwise compose an assembly of the NCV3 Sprinter and make it publicly available for all.

Eka
07-09-2017, 03:05 AM
I wish i had one of those laser scanners. I'd scan the interior from a couple spots. Do similar for the exterior, and underbody.

phil4nugen
11-09-2017, 01:36 PM
It looks like these guys must have 3D geometry. I have sent them an email to see if they will share it. (highly doubtful). Their kit looks pretty nice though.
http://splashcarpentry.com/

REB_CO
11-25-2017, 07:19 PM
I'm also interested in 3D geometry do to design work in Solidworks during the many months before I have the van. For example, I am curious if it is possible to use the C/D pillars as HVAC vent ducting to leave the roof free of exhaust fans (reckon I like a challenge!).

I've made initial contact to 3D scanning vendors to determine feasibility and cost. I did get a quote of about $1k for an interior scan, but it this type of work that is hard to entice vendors. A primary concern is that any scan will result in a gargantuan data file that will be so large as to be practically unusable. The shop that did quote scanning does not have the capability to reduce the point cloud density (resolution) from their scanner. Clearly we don't need .1mm scan resolution on a van that won't be built to more than a few millimeters tolerance.

For now I'm working with the MB 2D DXF to create a rudimentary interior volume, which might be barely enough to do conceptual layouts.

Cheerio - Ralph

REB_CO
12-04-2017, 01:48 PM
Hello Phil -

I contacted Splash Carpentry and received replies. I asked what type of CAD files they have and how the model is generated and he avoided my question.

phil4nugen
12-11-2017, 02:25 PM
Hey Ralph,
It looks like Splash Carpentry is starting a Kick Starter campaign to fund a laser scanner to expand their offerings in the van conversion market. It looks like they are thinking of offering paper templates of interior and floor panels. The section on CAD files is unclear, but this is the most promising source I have come across in my research. Maybe with the size of this forum we could have some influence on their efforts.
I would help finance a project if I felt I could get an accurate model with sufficient detail in a useable format. Thoughts?

Check it out. Make sure to scroll way down to see the Sprinter offerings.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1855385287/van-protection-kit

I am currently using a basic 3D model I got off the net for conceptual layout as well. The model had to be stretched 15" to create an LB version. I don't believe it is dimensionally accurate and it doesn't have the interior structure needed for attachment points etc., but I can see that my preferred layout will work and is really helping to get a "feel" for the space.

Davydd
12-11-2017, 05:24 PM
If they are charging for paper templates probably generated from their CAD files why would they share their CAD files? That is their bread and butter.

REB_CO
08-13-2018, 03:27 AM
Hope this helps me more than hindering; it took substantial effort. There's a compromise between resolution and Solidworks CAD speed.

OrioN
08-13-2018, 03:30 AM
Hope this helps me more than hindering; it took substantial effort. There's a compromise between resolution and Solidworks CAD speed.

:eek:

How large is this file?

REB_CO
08-13-2018, 03:56 AM
It's 120MB as shown, so not bad at all. Tho I work daily with assemblies at 500+MB with no perceptible slowdown; Solidworks doesn't seem the most well-equipped to handle this point cloud data. I started with scan file conversion for each subsection at just under the 500k point limit and those brought the CAD to a crawl. What you see above is substantially decimated; but for this sheet-metal car job it's probably the right level. I contracted out the scanning so am reliant on the hired help to do decimation post-processing. We also did an exterior roof scan because I aspire to integrate storage boxes with solar panels.

brownvan
08-13-2018, 10:39 PM
I went through this same escapade a year ago...best I could find was a 2D DXF off the Mercedes Upfitter portal that gave me Front/Side/Rear/Top views. I also looked into renting a laser scanner and decided it was prob too much of hassle to get a scan of reasonable size/precision to work well in Solidworks. I ultimately just reverse-engineered the interior walls; traced it all out on 6 mil clear plastic held with magnets and then built-up a model using direct measurements off the traces. It was pretty good, not super-precise, but enough such that I was able to design all my interior panels to be CNC cut and they all fit really well. I would say it was good time invested since I am still using the model and other details and I occasionally go back to the assy to add another part and rebuild it. Likewise, the DXF views were also helpful as I superimposed the various views into my assembly...for example recently had to dive into some roof curvature (and ridge location) details for clearances under my roof rack and the end view from the DXF at least gave me some of the wireframe that I could use to represent the form of the roof.

Montucky
08-14-2018, 12:34 AM
It's 120MB as shown, so not bad at all. Tho I work daily with assemblies at 500+MB with no perceptible slowdown; Solidworks doesn't seem the most well-equipped to handle this point cloud data. I started with scan file conversion for each subsection at just under the 500k point limit and those brought the CAD to a crawl. What you see above is substantially decimated; but for this sheet-metal car job it's probably the right level. I contracted out the scanning so am reliant on the hired help to do decimation post-processing. We also did an exterior roof scan because I aspire to integrate storage boxes with solar panels.

Very cool. I've also thought about having the interior scanned. Let me know if I can help out. I parsed through the DXF files on the upfitter website and think I've created a pretty decent shell representation of the interior, but since my van isn't here yet I have no way to confirm. I have a seat and work in Solidworks everyday, so perhaps we can wrangle that data into something meaningful. Hit my up with a private message if you'd like to chat about it.

-Rich

REB_CO
08-14-2018, 01:11 AM
I took this on because CAD is my vernacular; a carpenter uses a hammer if that's what he's use to using. I also started with the MB upfitter DXFs but wanted to do better at squeezing 10# of @#&%! into the perverbial 5# bag; to try to be a little inventive and make the best space of the interior. It's just a choice in how close you want to cut it and how you want to spend your time, and if you think your personal time is money. An old-school woodworker would make great progress with tracing templates.

CAD-speak, my work is as a consulting enginerd and although work jobs have threatened to use scan data several times, it's never happened. What you see in the image above is an assembly of six different scans (front/rear window areas, driver/passenger), which is a great breakdown to use. I found that SW has a 500k / ~20k limit importing in .stl files, and does not read the native .csf scan data. At those sizes, it would take at least ten minutes to import and even after saving to a .sldprt file, would still slow to a crawl. So I asked for very high data reduction (around 1.3MB per quadrant), and those files handle easily. I do have higher resolution (~8MB) versions of the sections embedded but suppressed in the assembly and hope to never need them; turning them on makes things crawl (but better for locating hole centers). My computer is indeed several years old (2015 M6800, 3.3GHz, 24GB and SSD) and I suppose a new computer would help, but I have no other reason for one or the cash bleed.

I put in a 22-hour day just doing the scanning... I drove 9 hours round-trip across the state because the shop there had scanned vehicles before, and we spent 10 hours scanning. I felt there was substantial risk that I'd come back with useless files. The guy did native file reduction in days later.... and I haven't seen their bill yet but it won't be pennies. As you can imagine I put time in fitting the pieces into an assembly with a meaningful orientation. The only part I could see needing help with would be to amortize the cost among some interested individuals! I could WebEx video conference to show what there is if someone thinks that sounds right.

Cheerio - Ralph
(day job: www.ascent-design.com)

Montucky
08-14-2018, 02:26 AM
@REB_CO: No worries and understand. I bet we know some of the same guys since you worked at RELA. You and I are in the same business and I lived for many years on the Front Range... I've got some pretty high end NVIDIA graphics in my machine, but sounds like you're working with some big data files. My Sprinter should be here in a week or so, so I'll take some measurements and correlate that to what I gleaned from the upfitter data. That - along with some tracing templates and rivnut centers is likely enough to get me going for my buildout. Keep me/us posted of how your data plays out. I'll do the same.

REB_CO
08-14-2018, 02:08 PM
You have correctly carbon-dated the fossil. RELA was my last j.o.b.

brownvan
08-14-2018, 06:54 PM
I took this on because CAD is my vernacular; a carpenter uses a hammer if that's what he's use to using. I also started with the MB upfitter DXFs but wanted to do better at squeezing 10# of @#&%! into the perverbial 5# bag; to try to be a little inventive and make the best space of the interior. It's just a choice in how close you want to cut it and how you want to spend your time, and if you think your personal time is money. An old-school woodworker would make great progress with tracing templates.

CAD-speak, my work is as a consulting enginerd and although work jobs have threatened to use scan data several times, it's never happened. What you see in the image above is an assembly of six different scans (front/rear window areas, driver/passenger), which is a great breakdown to use. I found that SW has a 500k / ~20k limit importing in .stl files, and does not read the native .csf scan data. At those sizes, it would take at least ten minutes to import and even after saving to a .sldprt file, would still slow to a crawl. So I asked for very high data reduction (around 1.3MB per quadrant), and those files handle easily. I do have higher resolution (~8MB) versions of the sections embedded but suppressed in the assembly and hope to never need them; turning them on makes things crawl (but better for locating hole centers). My computer is indeed several years old (2015 M6800, 3.3GHz, 24GB and SSD) and I suppose a new computer would help, but I have no other reason for one or the cash bleed.

I put in a 22-hour day just doing the scanning... I drove 9 hours round-trip across the state because the shop there had scanned vehicles before, and we spent 10 hours scanning. I felt there was substantial risk that I'd come back with useless files. The guy did native file reduction in days later.... and I haven't seen their bill yet but it won't be pennies. As you can imagine I put time in fitting the pieces into an assembly with a meaningful orientation. The only part I could see needing help with would be to amortize the cost among some interested individuals! I could WebEx video conference to show what there is if someone thinks that sounds right.

Cheerio - Ralph
(day job: www.ascent-design.com)

What sort of precision were you able to attain within a single scan and how well were you able to "knit" together different scan files to build your model?

REB_CO
08-14-2018, 08:33 PM
Heyyo brownvan: Is your van Dolomite Brown too? :thumbup:

I don't have a reference object scanned to answer your question, but methinks the short answer is "good enough for sheet metal work"???

But your two questions are spot-on in their relationship. There scan files come in with a random coordinate system, so I created some datum target points and dimensionally cranked things into place. The back door scan is the only thing that ties the left and right together... there is some scan overlap and I crank things around until the overlap lies approximately coincident. I've got it lined up sub-millimeter at the bottom and around 1mm or so at top... and can improve on that next time I'm inclined to burn some time.

This doesn't answer your question, but the process is to stick reflective fiduciary dots every 4" or so and then scan multiple times. The scanner software recognizes the dots and fits the multiple scan passes to the fixed dot. Photo of scanner (kid) at work. Raw scan of that driver's side front window panel was 2.6GB... reduced to 13MB .sldprt file to keep the assembly light.

My plan is to print out cabinet drawings on my roll printer and then cut curves on the bandsaw, so there will be an accumulation of errors. My goal is to form-fit rear bed into the jigger-jagger/curve at the rear doors and this will be a big help.

Graphite Dave
08-14-2018, 10:22 PM
Hate to be negative but I used a old fashioned tape measure to get van dimensions and used those to create a low tech 2D CAD drawing. No problems and every thing fit as expected.

Some times not having the smarts to do something fancy has its benefits.:thumbup:

offroadkid
08-15-2018, 08:06 PM
I don't know if this is CAD, but I saw this video on YouTube and downloaded the free version of Sketchup and Greg shows how to draw a Sprinter!

His is a 170" ours is a 144" so I just changed the measurement for the rear length.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b47sF7l1yDM

He also has this one where he added windows and wheel wells. I downloaded it and opened it in Sketchup but can't figure out how to edit it!

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7uozkwlclmheit6/YouTube%20Van%20Model.skp?dl=0

Go to his page and checkout all his videos, he has some neat stuff!


Hope this helps!

brownvan
08-15-2018, 09:58 PM
hey Ralph,

Looks cool and definitely an ambitious endeavor to undertake so hats off to you! :)
I think the optical/laser/non-contact dimensional measurement stuff is pretty helpful and I have used it for work thru a separate company in measuring delicate parts that our CMM couldn't physically probe without deforming the parts.
When I first started on my cargo van a year ago I was also compelled to try to do as much design in SW as time would permit and thought deeply about doing a scan so I could have a model of the form and features of the various sheet metal panels with which to work with in SW. My thought was along the lines of there were a bunch of potential hole-mount locations throughout the interior and alot of curves/straightlines/surfaces/features/etc that I would like to utilize and know their cartesian locations & forms as best as possible so I could have panels/frames & assemblies match up and clean margins. It sounds like you are thinking this as well and it is likely your scan model will definitely help.
I think one thing that sort of dragged on me was that while a scan-model of my van would help me to develop panels and parts/assys to fit the interior and mate with features in the interior, the question arose about how closely would it match the scan of another identical-model vehicle? I started to hypothesize what the physical part-tolerances were for a given piece of stamped sheet metal and then what the entire assembly tolerances would be for the various spot-welded sub-assemblies and complete interior space-cage. My guess is that alot of the subassy are robot welded on jigs and those jigs would align the pieces using a few key features with the rest of the sheet metal allowed to float until the entire cage was put together. It was sort of a rabbit-hole to think about and whether a 3D scan would be a useful representation of an assembled vehicle for someone else with the same model of van. I still wonder what it would reveal about the dimensions & form of the van interior...how tweaked everything is to make it go together, possible asymmetries, changes with temperature, etc.
Of course alot of this I thought about over the course of the past year and it has mostly helped me make no assumptions about the symmetry of the vehicle and to always check both sides and double-check my driving dims. In addition to CNC panels for the interior, I also designed/built an articulating (and removable) 4-panel bedframe platform that turns into two facing benches (either way) and mounts on rails above each wheel well...had to match the interior curvature of the walls to allow articulation and working with very precise dims. It was comprehensive, abit overkill, but it worked. Wish I had a scan of the interior, at least to get me in the neighborhood, within a few mm, to hash-out the mechanics of the design but I had to do alot of reverse engineering of physical traces into SW to refine my model and make sure it worked. and then recheck those dims throughout he process.
I'm interested to see how your path takes you and please keep us updated as our 3D model develops!

REB_CO
09-30-2018, 06:05 PM
Hello again! Sorry I've been out of touch;*life* has been happening and van build has not.

Psyched to hear and see other creative build-outs that really creatively squeeze more style and utility into the curves of the van. Curves are sexy; curves fit human ergonomics; and it's cool to cram more utility into a smaller space. I'm headed to the Annapolis yacht show next weekend with camera in hand for inspiration. BrownVan - I agree that it's just a sheet metal box with sheet metal tolerances and a good design works well with imperfect parts.

Another member expressed interest in the Solidworks CAD files, so I rebuilt the scan assembly using the older 2016 release to accommodate him. So if you are interested and not running the latest software release then these could work for you - drop me an email.

And oh dear Graphite Dave, not a stitch of negative trolling heard from you over here! :-/ Each to their own - variety here makes it all that much more interesting!

Cheerio - Ralph

SkiSprinter
10-03-2018, 04:12 PM
Hello again! Sorry I've been out of touch;*life* has been happening and van build has not.

Psyched to hear and see other creative build-outs that really creatively squeeze more style and utility into the curves of the van. Curves are sexy; curves fit human ergonomics; and it's cool to cram more utility into a smaller space. I'm headed to the Annapolis yacht show next weekend with camera in hand for inspiration. BrownVan - I agree that it's just a sheet metal box with sheet metal tolerances and a good design works well with imperfect parts.

Another member expressed interest in the Solidworks CAD files, so I rebuilt the scan assembly using the older 2016 release to accommodate him. So if you are interested and not running the latest software release then these could work for you - drop me an email.

And oh dear Graphite Dave, not a stitch of negative trolling heard from you over here! :-/ Each to their own - variety here makes it all that much more interesting!

Cheerio - Ralph

I am very interested in the CAD. Can you send me a PM with your email? I tried to send you a PM but it said you don't have messaging enabled...

NBB
10-03-2018, 06:49 PM
I've got it lined up sub-millimeter...there will be an accumulation of errors.
This will only work for your van, and I doubt the final product will have anything near holding 1mm tolerances.

Post back if you find different, love to see it.

Manufacturing variation in the van itself is going to be considerably larger than even a sloppy job of curve fitting the old fashion way with a compass and pencil.

Thus, these files will only be good for one and only one van.

It's all a fantasy.

Learn to deal with curves like a trim carpenter.

I'm a fan of CAD as well - however you don't need much more than a simple model to get the job done. The curves are just the last inch or two - leave a little extra, trace, cut - done.

REB_CO
10-03-2018, 07:31 PM
Whatever, NBB. Of course there are sheet metal tolerances, possibly 10mm end-to-end for a vehicle like this. A good design accommodates crap tolerances, a bad design demands perfect parts. My work track record speaks for itself.

Both paper & CAD are just tools to an end result. Use both, use one or use none as you wish.

Dogspeed
10-19-2018, 03:35 AM
So, who wants to share their cad files for a 170 2500?

noercarr
10-26-2018, 01:41 AM
I don't know if this is CAD, but I saw this video on YouTube and downloaded the free version of Sketchup and Greg shows how to draw a Sprinter!

His is a 170" ours is a 144" so I just changed the measurement for the rear length.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b47sF7l1yDM

He also has this one where he added windows and wheel wells. I downloaded it and opened it in Sketchup but can't figure out how to edit it!

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7uozkwlclmheit6/YouTube%20Van%20Model.skp?dl=0

Go to his page and checkout all his videos, he has some neat stuff!


Hope this helps!

highlight all > right click > unlock :cheers:

vantastic adventure
01-29-2019, 05:29 PM
I have files for the 144", 170", 170" ext. Not a scan, but the actual MB files. I'm compiling an assembly in SW. It's a little frustrating, as the files are missing some data (specifically, the parts are importing as non-solid-body parts, infinitesimaly thin lines), but I can usually get them converted into a solid part. I'll post them up here, for free, after I get things ironed out.

mrbrightside
02-05-2019, 01:04 AM
I have files for the 144", 170", 170" ext. Not a scan, but the actual MB files. I'm compiling an assembly in SW. It's a little frustrating, as the files are missing some data (specifically, the parts are importing as non-solid-body parts, infinitesimaly thin lines), but I can usually get them converted into a solid part. I'll post them up here, for free, after I get things ironed out.

what's the format you got the original data from mb in?

Tell_Me_More
02-05-2019, 05:16 PM
I have files for the 144", 170", 170" ext. Not a scan, but the actual MB files. I'm compiling an assembly in SW. It's a little frustrating, as the files are missing some data (specifically, the parts are importing as non-solid-body parts, infinitesimaly thin lines), but I can usually get them converted into a solid part. I'll post them up here, for free, after I get things ironed out.

Vantastic Adventures, How did you get your original files for import into solid works? Interested in the 170 CAD file. Would you be willing to send out the original import files? I could help you clean them up. I've done alot of work in SW and could clean up the broken surface files into solid bodies.

Excited that you have legitimate CAD files! Just called Mercedes and requested them but I have little hope they will provide. Would be very appreciative if you could share.

Cheers

vantastic adventure
02-05-2019, 06:03 PM
Vantastic Adventures, How did you get your original files for import into solid works? Interested in the 170 CAD file. Would you be willing to send out the original import files? I could help you clean them up. I've done alot of work in SW and could clean up the broken surface files into solid bodies.

Excited that you have legitimate CAD files! Just called Mercedes and requested them but I have little hope they will provide. Would be very appreciative if you could share.

Cheers
Hello

I've wanted to post the files the on the forum for all to use, but I have since been advised not to, as Mercedes Benz has a team of lawyers that don't take kindly to having their intellectual property distributed without consent. Bummer =(

Like you, I am also now trying to get permission from MB. I don't think it's terribly difficult to get these files from them. I'll update the forum on the process as I go along. There are several people on the forum that have them (and they'll almost certainly be in better shape than the ones I found).

I'm pretty sure Hein has files from MB, as he's able to make certain roof adapters and other parts that would not be possible without. Perhaps he could elucidate how long the whole process takes.

I've of course deleted the MB files while I wait to hear back from the Mother Ship. The files I had are a Sprinter assembly from 2013, in STP format. They're around on the internet. And they're a ton of work, but almost everything is there to build multiple variations of the Sprinter.

vantastic adventure
02-05-2019, 06:09 PM
Interesting that I'm getting so many messages and PMs from accounts that joined in Jan 2019, and have only one post.

OrioN
02-05-2019, 06:14 PM
Interesting that I'm getting so many messages and PMs from accounts that joined in Jan 2019, and have only one post.

Google search bots doing their wonderful job.

Tell_Me_More
02-05-2019, 08:25 PM
Hello

I've wanted to post the files the on the forum for all to use, but I have since been advised not to, as Mercedes Benz has a team of lawyers that don't take kindly to having their intellectual property distributed without consent. Bummer =(

Like you, I am also now trying to get permission from MB. I don't think it's terribly difficult to get these files from them. I'll update the forum on the process as I go along. There are several people on the forum that have them (and they'll almost certainly be in better shape than the ones I found).

I'm pretty sure Hein has files from MB, as he's able to make certain roof adapters and other parts that would not be possible without. Perhaps he could elucidate how long the whole process takes.

I've of course deleted the MB files while I wait to hear back from the Mother Ship. The files I had are a Sprinter assembly from 2013, in STP format. They're around on the internet. And they're a ton of work, but almost everything is there to build multiple variations of the Sprinter.

I understand not wanting to put yourself in the line of fire with MB, I have put a request in for files with them hopefully they come though. Could you point us in the direction of these 2013 STP files in the meantime? I have been scouring the internet and cant come up with anything.

I'm new to this forum just made the account as I found this forum in my search for high detail cad files,

doctorzaius
02-06-2019, 12:17 AM
I'm not sure which is more unlikely: 1) that you will get permission, or 2) that MB will care if you use their drawings. It would be very interesting to see the license that comes along with the files in the first place. That would be the place to start.

vantastic adventure
02-06-2019, 06:50 AM
I'm not sure which is more unlikely: 1) that you will get permission, or 2) that MB will care if you use their drawings. It would be very interesting to see the license that comes along with the files in the first place. That would be the place to start.

Oh, that's the place to start?
Well shoot, I'm going about it all wrong.

Tell_Me_More
02-06-2019, 04:46 PM
Vantastic Adventure, Can you point us in the direction of those 2013 STP files? I just heard from MB and they said you must become a Master Upfitters before they will send you CAD. Would great appreciate some clues as to where to look for those STP files.

Cheers!

vantastic adventure
02-06-2019, 05:25 PM
Vantastic Adventure, Can you point us in the direction of those 2013 STP files? I just heard from MB and they said you must become a Master Upfitters before they will send you CAD. Would great appreciate some clues as to where to look for those STP files.

Cheers!
Another forum member gave them to me.

NBB
02-06-2019, 06:42 PM
A step file is something generally sent to a vendor for manufacturing. Unless you're making material for MB, there's just no way. It's most likely somewhere these files were pirated [cough - China] .

A high level of accuracy in the model is not necessary for 1-up conversion work.

I can say from quite a bit of CAD experience in industry - you'll spend way more time diking with the cad model to get the last 1/4" than you will to scribe your material with a pencil and cut the same away during fab - which because of manufacturing variation being at least that same 1/4" - you'll be doing this anyway.

Thus, you have zero to gain for the additional effort over a far simpler model - sketch-up (or similar) - and a few dozen measurements from your actual van.

vantastic adventure
02-06-2019, 08:42 PM
I agree. For a one time conversion they're not at all necessary. It's easy to find a few angles and take some measurements. CAD itself is totally unnecessary for a simple conversion. But it is fun to push the limits, and analysis can save weight, reduce costs, improve design.

doctorzaius
02-06-2019, 09:04 PM
It's also completely worthwhile to create something that can be reused. There's no point in everyone doing dozens of separate measurements in separate one-off builds.

Graphite Dave
02-07-2019, 03:14 AM
I agree. For a one time conversion they're not at all necessary. It's easy to find a few angles and take some measurements. CAD itself is totally unnecessary for a simple conversion. But it is fun to push the limits, and analysis can save weight, reduce costs, improve design.

I found the use of 2D CAD to be very useful. Nice to be able to make changes on paper and not as you build. No need to change anything when you measure correctly and have it drawn in CAD correctly. Helps if you have many years of experience using a CAD program. No need to take the time to learn a program.

That being said I can not imagine what value a 3D scan would provide. Just a lot of work for very little value IMO. I did make one error on the shower pan drawing that 3D would have prevented. Other than that everything fit as expected.

NBB
02-07-2019, 01:46 PM
I’m a fan of using 3D CAD, I used ProE, something I learned before Solidworks was invented. It’s just the van model need not be more complicated than some datum features. Some places get more detail, others hardly any. 2D is old school, but if it works for you and that’s your experience, then great. As for pushing limits and doing analysis? Are you kidding - for what - on a basic cabinet project - how? You’re not designing the engine.

Graphite Dave
02-07-2019, 02:09 PM
Simply used a tape measure to obtain the mounting locations for the 80/20 floor frame. Once the floor frame is in place there is a reference base for all other vertical measurements. I used a temporary vertical post bolted between the centerline of the floor to the center of a roof rib. Measure from the temporary centerline vertical post to the walls was used to get width dimensions.

Floor info:

https://www.ortontransit.info/floor

Tell_Me_More
02-07-2019, 06:09 PM
I agree 3D cad is unnecessary but a great tool for those who have access. I think it would be a big benefit to use the cad to do a space claim on the major components to maximize efficiency. All the cupboards and storage compartments could be CNC cut with box wood joints. Which would be a joy to assemble and look great! As previously mentioned the cad will never match the physical van, but design all the components with run out shouldn't be too hard. Perhaps some edges would need to be cut to suit while installing.

I'm sure I could get away with a few basic measurements and make my own cad. From my experience as a designer (which isn't a whole lot) what ever you don't draw in cad will be the thing that you run into during assembly. Another pro to cad would be it allows you to start designing and planing with out owning the van yet. All that being said, yes I agree CAD is not necessary.

I do hope one day MB makes something available.

Tell_Me_More
02-26-2019, 07:55 PM
Another forum member gave them to me.

Hey Vantastic Adventure, I sent you a DM, But i'm new to this whole forum thing, did you get it?

Tell_Me_More
04-12-2019, 09:21 PM
Well I hate to admit defeat, but I cannot dig anything up. Going to laser Scan a 2014 170"wb high top 2500, I plan on posting the cad for those that are interested. Unless anyone has found any new leads on the MB cad files???

Laser scan will be of the interior and under side of the vehicle.

tiktaalik
05-08-2019, 12:22 AM
If anyone has the CAD STP Assembly mentioned here, would you mind sending me a PM? Thanks!